Category Archives: SITES TO SEE

HELEN CASTLE’S ADDISON PAGES

INCLUDING GREVILLE’S POST OFFICE DIRECTORY.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hcastle/

The 3 main areas of this site are:
Miscellaneous Transcripts from Australia
Grevilles Post Office Directory
Penrith District Registers
Helen Castle, previously Shellharbour NSW, now living in Narangba Qld Australia.

Not a site to be missed. Helen has just sent me the new links. I strongly recommend taking a look at it. This is what I would like to be able to create myself and don’t seem orderly enough to achieve. It was one of the first major entries into this world for me. Thank you Helen.

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Irish Convicts to Australia

http://www.claimaconvict.net/index.html

 

Lesley Uebel

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http://newsarch.rootsweb.com/th/read/AUS-PT-JACKSON-CONVICTS/2001-10/1001976898

Governor King to the Transport Commissioners
HRA – Aug 1802
Gentlemen,
I had the honor of receiving your letters and their several enclosures dated
as per margin by the Coromandel which arrived here 13th June, Hercules 26th
June, Atlas 6th July and Perseus 4th instant.
The above transports were cleared of all the prisoners, passengers,
provisions and stores, before the time limited for that purpose was expired;
and the Commissary has furnished the respective masters with receipts for
all that was landed here.
The healthy state in which the Coromandel and Perseus arrived requires my
particularly pointing out the masters of those ships to your notice. It
appears by the log books, surgeon’s diaries and the unanimous voice of every
person on board those ships that the utmost kindness had been shown by the
masters and surgeons to the convicts. This, with the proper application of
the comforts Government had so liberally provided for them and the good
state of health all the people were in, induced the master of the Coromandel
to proceed without stopping at any port. He arrived here in four months and
one day, bringing every person in a state of high health, and fit for
immediate labour; and altho’ it appears that the Perseus necessarily
stopped at Rio and the Cape, yet the convicts were in as good condition as
those on board the Coromandel; nor can I omit the great pleasure felt by
myself and the other visiting officers at the grateful thanks expressed by
the prisoners and passengers for the kind attention and care they had
received from the masters and surgeons, who returned, an unusual quantity of
the articles laid in by Government for the convicts during the voyage.
I am sorry that the conduct of the Masters of the Hercules and Atlas appears
to be the reverse of what I have just stated. By the surgeon’s list, and
the masters of the Hercules and Atlas’s letters to me, of which I send you a
copy, you will observe the dreadful mortality that raged on board those
ships, exclusive of the numbers killed. Altho’ there was no mutiny on board
the Atlas, yet in every other respect the master of that vessels conduct
appears as much if not more reprehensible than the other. The miserable
state the survivors were in in both those ships on their arrival in this
port, being filthy beyond description, some of the convicts lying dead with
heavy irons on, many of them died as they were coming from the ship to the
hospital. These circumstances, together with the complaints made against
the masters by the officers, rendered it necessary to investigate the
necessity of their having to put in Rio de Janeiro and the Cape, and how far
the masters had infracted the charter-parties. The result of these
investigations are enclosed. The log books and diaries will be forwarded by
the first direct conveyance mentioned in my letter of the 23rd ultimo.
The master of the Hercules was necessarily tried by a Court of
Vice-Admiralty on two indictments, first for killing ten men in the mutiny,
and afterwards for shooting one man (a ringleader), it was alleged, some
time after the mutiny had subsided. On the first count he was acquitted,
and on the second he was found guilty of manslaughter, and was sentenced by
the Court to pay a fine of 500 Pounds to the Orphan School, and to be
imprisoned until it was paid. As a doubt arose in my mind respecting the
propriety of his being fined, I have given a conditional remission of that
part of the sentence which I have referred to the judge of the Admiralty
Court, for His Majesty’s pleasure being signified thereon; and that the
course of justice may not be perverted (if I am wrong respecting the fine)
the master is bound over to abide by that determination and to surrender
himself within five days after his arrival in the port of London.
The master of the Atlas having such a quantity of private trade and spirits
on board, appears to have produced most of the bad consequences complained
of in that ship. What that private trade consisted of , and the bulk
occupied on board, will be obvious from the enclosed report of that ship’s
entry.
I have judged it necessary to forward this by the Hercules, in case she
should arrive in England before my letters which I mean to send by the
conveyance pointed out in my letter of the 23rd ultimo
I have, etc
Philip Gidley King

SHIP ON WHICH ANN MORAN ARRIVED.

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Mayberry Home Page

http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/

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Wicklow United Irishmen
1797 – 1804

http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/wicklow.htm

THE RISE OF THE DEFENDERS 1793-5

 

http://www.iol.ie/~fagann/1798/dfender3.htm

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Index to the Colonial Secretary’s Papers, 1788-1825

http://colsec.records.nsw.gov.au/indexes/colsec/default.htm

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Deaths and Mutiny on convict vessels provoke a scandal

http://www.convictcreations.com/history/description.htm

Sydney, August 9. Despite the past disgraces of convict ships, and the regulations and warnings designed to improve their condition, two more vessels have arrived at Sydney in deplorable state, and with awful death rates.
The Hercules arrived on June 26 with the news that 30 convicts had died on the voyage and another 11 had been killed during a mutiny, with two dying later of their wounds and a third being summary executed by the captain.
The Atlas arrived on July 6, having lost 68 people through scurvy and dysentery.
Governor King described the ships as being "filthy beyond description. Some convicts were lying dead with heavy irons on, while many more died as they were coming to the hospital"
There has been an inquiry as to whether the masters had contravened their charters as convict carriers. The Governor noted that the Atlas was carrying liquor.

SITES TO SEE : NEW SOUTH WALES

NEW SOUTH WALES

THE ONLINE BOOKS PAGE.

EMIGRANTS FROM THE FAMILY :

YEAR
SHIP
NAME

1838
BRILLIANT
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL

1839
JAMES MORAN
MCLEODS AND MACKAYS

1849
VICTORIA
WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS

1853
WILLIAM BROWN
JACKSONS

1853
BEEJAPORE
CRAIGS AND HURRELLS

FOR SOME BACKGROUND ATMOSPHERE OF THIS PERIOD , try this one from Google Books:

Notes and sketches of New South Wales: during a residence in that colony

A RESIDENCE IN THAT COLONY FROM 1839 TO 1844.

By Mrs. Charles Meredith

CONTENTS.

Preface \ -i

CHAPTER I.

Embarkation — Indisposition—Pleasures of a Sea Voyage—Fellow-pas-

sengers—Observance of Character—Devonshire Coast—Pilots—Land

Luxuries—H.M.S. Hercules—Eddystone Lighthouse—Last Land . 1

CHAPTER II.

Bay of Biscay—Spanish Coast—Employment the best preventive of.

Ennui—Phosphorescence of the Sea—Portuguese Men-of-war—Swal-

lows— Tenerifie — Speaking the Cherub — Fear of Pirates—Por-

poises—Flying Fish—Capture of a Boneto—Dolphins . 7

Chapter in.

Calm in the Tropics—Sharks — Turtle — lanthina—Shovel-board—

" Crossing the Line "—Loss of the North Star—Southern Constellations

—Moonlight in the Tropics—Sunsets—Waterspouts—"Sun-dogs" . ’16

CHAPTER IV.

Whales and " Jets d’eau"—Birds—Boatswain—Boobies—Cape Pigeon—

Mischief of Idleness—" Mr.Winkles" at Sea—Great Albatross—Nelly

—Stormy Petrel—Blue Petrel—Sailors’ Delicacies—Stormy Weather 23

CHAPTER V.

Island of St. Paul’s—Islands in Bass’s Straits—Mutton-birds—Botany

Bay Heads—General excitement—Heads of Port Jackson—Scenery—

New Zealanders—First sight of Sydney—Pull ashore—Comforts of

Land Life—George Street, Sydney—The Domain—Eucalyptus, &c.

—Wooloomooloo—Government Gardens 31
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VI.

Sydney Market—Fish, &c.—Dust, Flies, Mosquitoes—Drive to the

Lighthouse — Flowers — Parrots—Black Cockatoos—Hyde Park—

Churches — Libraries — " Currency " Population — Houses — Balls,

&c. —Inns—Colonial Newspapers Page 43

CHAPTER VII.

Leave Sydney—" Clearings"—Huts of the Working Classes — Chain-

Gangs — Parramatta — Creeks and Rivers —Inn — Birds — Road to

Penrith—Grasshoppers—Penrith—Nepean—Emu Plains—Ascent of

the Blue Mountains—Waratah 56

CHAPTER VIII.

A "Country Inn"—Breakfast—Contrasts—A Bush Ramble and Digres-

sion about Ants—Mountain Scenery—Cattle Skeletons—"Weather-

board" Inn—Supper and Night at " Bliud Paddy’s"—Mountains, and

the Surveyor’s Roads—Mount Victoria—Convict Gangs and Bush-

rangers—Inn at the " Rivulet," and its Inhabitants—The Ruling Vice 66

CHAPTER IX.

" Hassan’s Walls"—Grass Trees—Mount Lambey—Victoria Inn—Speci-

men of Benevolent Politeness—Colonial Bridges—First View of

Bathurst—The " Settlement"—Dearth—Climate—Hot Winds—Pro-

cessions of Whirlwinds—Hurricanes . . . . . .79

CHAPTER X.

».

Bathurst Society and Hospitality—" White Rock"—Native Dance and

Ceremony—Kangaroo Dance—Appearance of Natives—Children—

" Gins "—Their marriage, slavery, and sufferings—Family Dinner-

party—Adopted Children—Infanticide—Religion — " Devil-Devil"—

Language—Story of Hougong and Jimmy—" Ay, ay ?"—Duties of

the Toilet—Native Songs—Mimicry—Fondness for English Dress—

Boundary Laws—Legal Parricide—Habitual Treachery . .90

CHAPTER XI.

Native Huts—" Gunyon"—Natives’ ingenuity in Duck-Snaring and

Fishing—Native Weapons—Green Frogs—Freshwater Shells—Platy-

pus — Spur-winged Plover—Australian Harebell — Convolvulus —

Everlastings—Peppermint Tree—Opossums—Natives’ mode of taking

His
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XII. ,

Native Turkeys—Their mode of Incubation—Native Cranberry—Our

Return — Locusts — Manna — Transformations — Ground Grubs —

Night at the Rivulet—New flowers—Heat and Dust—" Weather-

board" Inn—Walk to the Cascade—Fringed Violet—Waratahs—

Fine View—Lories Page 114

CHAPTER XIII.

Storm and fine view on Lapstone Hill—Farm-house in the " public" line

—Arrive at Parramatta — Steamboat — Scenery on the " River "—

Sydney Christmas Tree—Christmas Day—Tippling Servants . 124

CHAPTER XIV.

Homebush—Colonial Country-houses—The " Avenue"—Gates—Slip-

rails — Bushrangers — Mounted Police — Dingoes — Flying Fox —

Flying Opossum—Native Cats—Birds—Robins—Swallows— Knife-

grinder—Coachman—Bell-bird—Laughing Jackass—Larks—Game 129

CHAPTER XV.

Norfolk Island Pine—English Pear-tree—Daisy — Bush Flowers—

Creepers—He-oak—Zamia—" Wooden Pear-tree"—Native Cherry—

Insect Architecture—Twig-nests, &c.—Butterflies—Ground Spiders—

Tarantula—Silk Spiders—Scorpions—Hornets—Mosquitoes—Ants . 139

CHAPTER XVI.

Guanas—Lizards—Snakes—Salt Marshes—Fishing—Crabs—Toad-fish

—Mangrove-trees—Romance and reality—Night sounds — Orange-

Groves—Gardens—Gigantic Lily—Scarcity of fresh water—Winter

Rains—Salt Well — Climate in Winter—Society — Conversation—

Servants—Domestic matters—Embarkation for Van Diemen’s Land 150

N.B. OUR EMIGRANTS WOULD NOT HAVE HAD THE SAME ADVANTAGES AS MRS MEREDITH .

AUSTRALIAN FLOTILLA

           http://www.morpeth-p.schools.nsw.edu.au/History.htm

 

          Minor shipping lines and Ship owners  registered in NEW SOUTH WALES

JAMES MORGAN AND WILLIAM BROWN

5ships_30588_md

SHIPS AT SEA ( NOT OUR SHIPS. JUST SHIPS )

ozmariners@ozlists.com ozmariners@ozlists.com

_________________________________________________________

WILHELMINA MCLEOD AND SIBLINGS WITH THEIR MOTHER JANET MACKAY IN 1839 and THE JACKSONS ON THE WILLIAM B BROWN IN 1853.

I stumbled across a classified advertisement in an 1839 Gazette for the ship WAVERLEY. I had been looking for the JAMES MORGAN on which I had been told that Wilhelmina and family travelled . It appears now that JAMES MORGAN is the Master’s name and the ship on which they immigrated is the WAVERLEY.

THE WAVERLEY seems also to be carrying Irish convicts so I shall begin looking. The Mcleods and Mackays are registered as from the SUTHERLAND SHIRE of SCOTLAND and coming as immigrants.

Finding that curly one caused me to wonder about the WILLIAM BROWN. I thought that might also have been the Master’s name rather than that of the ship. In fact it is the name of the Schooner and of the owner who, as you will see below, also becomes Master.

 

gse_multipart39203

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly.

 

MARY ANNE WARNER provides this detailed site. I just found the WILLIAM B BROWN on it. The schooner on which the JACKSONS came free in 1853. Mary Anne has a gracious way of dealing with things which I envy and a knack of saying thanks to her helpers which I lack. Great Site.

 

AND FROM NLA. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article667247  The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 21 May 1853, page 2. News

The William Barry Brown, schooner, left
Honolulu 17th February, and called at Strong’s
Island. The crew of the Paragon, whaler of

Nantucket, Captain Nelson, were there, that
vessel having been wrecked on the outer reef on
the 20th March ; she had been out 27 months,
with 400 barrels, and part of the crew came on

to Sydney in the schooner. On account of some
misunderstanding existing between Captain
White, who commanded the William Barry
Brown,on her leaving Honolulu, and Mr. Brown

the owner, Captain While was left at Strong’s
Island.

 

globe_sm

 

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KERSWELL COAT OF ARMS COURTESY MIKE AND SHORT KERSWELL FAMILY HISTORY.

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-family-crest-coat-arms.html

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-coat-of-arms.html

 

LOOK FOR SUSANNAH KERSWELL

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne’s-heritage-web-site

JOHN CURTIS

 

JOHN CURTIS CAME AS CONVICT ON THE GANGES IN 1797. RANDOM EXTRACTS FROM NLA NEWSPAPERS MENTIONING THE NAME JOHN CURTIS. ONCE AGAIN . COULD BE OUR JOHN. MIGHT NOT BE. NEVERTHELESS THE ENTRIES ARE WORTH READING ON THE NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIA WEBSITE.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627695

SYDNEY GAZETTE 1809

Lost or Mislaid, a Note of Hand drawn by John Curtis in favor of Thomas Jones for £40. This is to caution the Public against receiving in payment the said Note, it being my property.

Hugh Devlin

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627801

More about the same note. Could well be Grandfather John since he lived at Parramatta at this time.

BELLINGER NOTES FROM THE NLA NEWSPAPERS

MAY HOLS 08 017

BELLINGEN BRIDGE 2008

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article692605

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE : COASTERS IN 1847.

___________________________________________

BELLINGER CEDAR IN 1847

NORTHERN CEDAR.-On Monday last we noticed the arrival of some extraordinarily large logs of cedar, by the new schooner built at the Bellinger River for Mr. John Robertson, Market Wharf: Since then we have learnt that one-half the cargo (30,000  feet cedar) is the produce of only one tree, the parent of the immense logs first noticed. This interesting specimen of Bellinger produce yielded about 15,000 feet sawn timber, and realised in Sydney upwards of one hundred guineas. The purchase, we believe, has been made for the China market; and as the quality of this cedar is correspondent with its magnitude, it will tend, we trust, to increase the growing repute of Australian cedar with the Celestials.-S. M. Herald, August 19. 1847

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article692605

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article693044

THE SCHOONER . VIXEN. -We are happy to state that this vessel, which has for some

time past been given up by most persons as lost, arrived in the harbour in safely on

Tuesday evening. Captain Stevens informs us, that after leaving this port for Newcastle

on the 17th July, he experienced nothing but heavy gales from the westward, and was

driven to a distance of about four hundred miles off the land, which he did not make

again until the 7th ultimo, when be spoke the ketch Brothers, of Sydney, (being then

off the Bellinger River) in a very distressed state, but could render her no assistance, as

the gale had not abated. Captain Stevens then bore up for the Richmond River, and 

from thence has brought on a full cargo of cedar.

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article693881

The new schooner built at the Bellinger River for Mr. John Robertson, and which arrived in Sydney a few weeks since,

has been purchased by Captain Hovenden, of the schooner Harlequin, for the sum of  £905. –

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 1 July 1848, page 2. News 2766 words

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article710635

 

A new three-masted schooner called the Helen arrived in Harbour on Wednesday

last, from the Bellinger River, having been built there by Mr. M’Donald, for Messrs.

Inder and Tebbutt, of Sydney. She is about 90 tons builder’s measurement, and her di-

mensions nr:- 73 feet over keel, 17 feet beam and 7 feet depth of hold. She has on board

45,000 feet cedar

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 26 July 1848, page 3.

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711021

 

The Phoenix, from the Clarence River,

was compelled to seek shelter at the Seal

Rocks on Saturday last, from the southerly

gale, and remained there twenty-four hours.

The schooner Secret, from Moreton Bay, and

the Jane Scott, from the Bellinger River,

were lying there wind-bound on Sunday

morning

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article680322

MURDERS BY THE BLACKS.- Intelligence was received yesterday, in Sydney, from the Bellinger River, dated the 17th inst. stating
that Daniel Devlin, His wife, and Dennis Cheyne, all living on John Robertson’s cedar cutting station, had been inhumanly murdered by the blacks. The same letter also states that a civilized black, who had been living for a considerable time with Commissioner Massie, had been decoyed away and murdered by the Maitland tribe on the M’Leay River. The white population of these districts are said to be out in pursuit of tbe savages. The particulars may be expected in Sydney in a few days. Mrs. Devlin has left a child nine months old. Her parents
reside at the Five Islands.-Herald, Mar. 30. 1846

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article702844

 

The Star of China has made a fair passage of fourteen days from Auckland, notwithstanding she had experienced exceedingly
had weather along the coast. She was off the Bellinger River on the 23rd instant, having been driven out of her course by south-west
winds and strong northerly currents. On Friday last, she was compelled to seek shelter in Seal Rock Bay, where she remained about
thirty hours ; and on Sunday put into Port Stephens, from whence she sailed on Tuesday morning.

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 2 June 1849, page 3.

_________________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700673

The master of the schooner Fama, David
Dennis, was drowned at the Bellinger River,

on the 22nd July, by the capsizing of a boat

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 1 September 1849, page 3.

_________________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article695589

THE STEAMER ” PHOENIX.”-A rumour has been in circulation, since the arrival from the

Richmond River of the ketch Pelican, that the Phoenix was on the bar at the Clarence. The

news was communicated by some blacks to one of the passengers by the Pelican, but in the

absence of more authentic information we would hope that the rumour is without foundation.

People’s Advocate, March 16.-Rumours were rife in town last night that the Phoenix steamer,

now 14 days overdue on her return trip from the Clarence to Sydney, had been wrecked on her

passage thither. We give the rumour as it reached us, and believe it to have originated in

a report of the blacks, of their having discovered some bags of flour and other articles of a description likely to have been an up-country cargo, on

the line of coast, floated ashore between the Bellinger and Richmond Rivers-Bell’s Life,

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 20 March 1850, page 2.

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READ ON AT THE LINKS ABOVE FOR MORE BELLINGER TALES. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA. BRAVO !

_________________________________________________

 

more tales of BELLINGEN and the 19th Century in the Colony on :

http://melindakendall.wordpress.com/

KALANG 2008 020 KALANG 2008 021
THE BRIDGE AT GLENIFFER (NAMED BY A CRAIG ANCESTOR) NEVER NEVER CREEK GLENIFFER VALLEY

 

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne%27s-heritage-web-site

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Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm 

Mary-Anne Warner’s site transcribing STATE RECORDS of SHIPS. easy to navigate. Detailed.

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS

ASK ABOUT IRELAND

 http://www.askaboutireland.ie/show_homepage.do

Ask About Ireland is your place to find answers about Ireland. Our countryside, our heritage, the way we work and play. Here you’ll have unique access to new information, rare images and documents from Irish public libraries, museums and archives.
It brings the Ireland of the past alive and makes you more aware of the Ireland of today. Go on to find out more from your local library, museum & archive.
Enjoy, discover, learn.

http://www.askaboutireland.ie/show_homepage.do

LINK SUPPLIED ON THE SUTHERLAND SHIRE GROUPS SITE.