Category Archives: SHIPS

ATLAS AND HERCULES

Hi,

I am writing a book which details the convicts and voyage of the convict ships Atlas1 and the Hercules. It also covers Major George Johnston and his background. A question, it has been noted on your site that Johnston was on the Hercules when it arrived in June 1802. My research from the records show him arriving on the ‘Buffalo’ in October 1802. Would much appreciate your advice where the record of his being on the Hercules was obtained. Happy to provide the final chapter on the ship when completed.

Kind regards

Brian Ahearn

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SITES TO SEE : THE TIME OF ANN MORAN AND THE HERCULES.

http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1802.htm

http://www.convictconnections.org.au/shipsA-I.html

http://www.danbyrnes.com.au/blackheath/ships3.htm

http://www.historyservices.com.au/nsw_colonial_chronology_1770_1803.htm

http://www.jstor.org/pss/27516597

http://www.mcginleyclan.org/irishslaves.htm

 

EXTRACT FROM http://www.ulladulla.info/historian/1804deaths.html

Deaths 1804 NSW & Norfolk Island Early Colonial History Research and Indexed by Historian Cathy Dunn. 

Castle Hill

HUGHES

James

1804

SG 19 Jan 1806. Last week a native informed Tarlington, a settler, that the skeleton of a white man, with a musket and tin kettle laying beside him, had been seen under the first ridge of the mountains. The settler accompanied the native, and found the skeleton, and as described, the bones of which being very long, leads to a more than probable conjecture, that the remains are those of James Hughes, who absconded from Castle Hill the 15th of February 1804, in company with 15 others, most of whom had recently arrived in the Hercules, on the ridiculous pretext of finding a road to China, but in reality to commit the most unheard of depredations; the consequences of which were, that the whole except Hughes were shortly apprehended, and 13 capitally convicted before the Criminal Court, of whom two were executed, and 11 pardoned. Hughes was an able active man, well known in Ireland during the rebellion that existed in that country for his abominable depravities; and it is hoped his miserable end will warn the thoughtless, inexperienced and depraved against an inclination to exchange the comfort and security derived from honest labour, to depart from which can only lead to the most fatal consequences

Parramatta

HUMES

Samuel

Mar 1804

Leader in the 1804 Battle of Vinegar Hill – rebellion executed at Parramatta and hung in chains, Convict Hercules I 1802

________________________________________________________

 

Revolution, counter-revolution, and union

By Jim Smyth

JOHN READY c 1790-1831 PT 2.

Whilst John Ready journeyed out, Governor Macquarie had been making tremendous advances in the affairs of the Colony and had worked hard to better the lot of all. The new towns of Windsor, Castlereagh, Wilberforce and Pittown that he had created were going well, but the Gentry were upset by his kindness and thoughtfulness to the emancipists whom he considered to be the backbone of the future nation. He was also having problems with the 73rd Regiment and asked that it be removed complete for instead of upholding the law, it was like its predecessor the NSW Rum Corps, flouting it. (Macquarie His Life, Adventures and Times. A. M. Ellis.)

Drought had continued all through the Summer and Autumn of early 1814, but by April the road to Windsor was finished and the Turnpike from Sydney to Liverpool almost completed, with all able bodied men having to contribute labour in building the section near the properties, which would benefit them when completed. 

It was into this scene, with food becoming ever scarcer as the drought continued and the Colony awaiting the shipment of grain from India, that JOHN READY and the other prisoners from the THREE BEES entered.

Taken to the prisoners’ barracks they were divided into groups, allocated to Parramatta, Windsor or Liverpool and sent there under guard. John , travelling along the newly completed road was sent to WINDSOR and put to work in the Government Dairy. Whether this was just coincidence, or because his mother, JOHANNAH READY, worked in Government House is unknown, but he was receiving rations there in 1814 (Windsor Ration Book loc. A 803 pp 56,66,116 ML) and in the same year was mentioned as being Overseer at the Government Dairy.

Towards the end of that desperate year, whilst Cox was building his road over the mountains, the rains came and the crops which such a short time before looked doomed, began to look as if they would give a reasonable harvest. Things commenced to improve for all, grass finally started to grow again, the cows to give more milk and the beef cattle to fill out.

In the SYDNEY GAZETTE of the 21st September 1816 and again in 1817, it is recorded that a letter had arrived for JOHN. Regretfully there is no record of who sent them or where they came from but the family in Ireland was obviously keeping in touch as moves were later made by his mother to bring his brother Philip and family out to Australia. On his next visit to Sydney, John was able to see the advances made to the Town for the new Hospital was rising in Macquarie Street under the direction of FRANCIS GREENWAY and built at no cost to the Government.

 

For the next two years John went about his business at the Dairy without attracting adverse attention and on the 30th April 1819 there appeared an entry in the LAND OFFICE Records.

 

DOWNEY TO READY

Deed Poll bearing the date the 15th day February 1819 under the hand and seal of PATRICK DOWNEY of prospect, settler whereby for the considerations therein mentioned he, the said PATRICK DOWNEY.

Did absolutely bargain, sell, assign, transfer and make over to JOHN READY of PARRAMATTA all his right, title and interest of five houses and tenements, situate in GEORGE ST PARRAMATTA, formerly the Property of THOMAS PEARCE purchased by him the said PATRICK DOWNEY at Public Auction which said houses and Tenements are more particularly described in a certain assignment dated 30th day November 1818 from  ROBERT JENKINS to him the said PATRICK DOWNEY. 

On the 31st August John was granted a pardon by Governor Macquarie (Pardons Reel 771 AO) and on 4th February 1820 at the age of thirty, was joined at ST JOHN’S PARRAMATTA, in the bonds of Holy Matrimony to Elizabeth, the 17 year old daughter of JOHN CURTIS and ANN MORAN who lived nearby at Toongabbie. The ceremony was conducted by JOHN CROSS with MICHAEL AND MARY DWYEE as witnesses. ( St Johns Register ML).

As a married man owning twenty head of cattle, John applied for a grant of 50 acres of land to start a farm of his own. The grant was made in 1821 and listed in the 12 May edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE.

 

On the 31st August John was granted a pardon by Governor Macquarie (Pardons Reel 771 AO) and on 4th February 1820 at the age of thirty, was joined at ST JOHN’S PARRAMATTA, in the bonds of Holy Matrimony to Elizabeth, the 17 year old daughter of JOHN CURTIS and ANN MORAN who lived nearby at Toongabbie. The ceremony was conducted by JOHN CROSS with MICHAEL AND MARY DWYEE as witnesses. ( St Johns Register ML).

In the 1825 Muster, John is listed as being a landholder at CASTLE HILL but he is recorded as supplying fresh meat to the Commissariat at Parramatta on 24 February 1821 and Pork on 24th March 1821 so must have had access to some land in the meantime. 

John and Elizabeth’s marriage however was going through a stormy time with the unhappy Elizabeth eventually running away, for in the 15 February edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE a notice appeared warning anyone against giving credit to his wife ELIZABETH READY, formerly Curtis, on his account as she had run away from home without any just cause or provocation.

John was again mentioned in the SYDNEY GAZETTE of 8th JANUARY 1823 as having supplied meat to the Government Stores.

With the income from the property acquired from PATRICK DOWNEY earlier, John decided to expand his interests and on the 25th April 1825, a notice from the Surveyor-General’s Office appeared in the AUSTRALIAN that a grant of land was ready for delivery to JOHN REIDY(sic) and FRANCIS PENDERGRASY. ( Francis had married John’s mother Johannah the previous year.)

IN THIS YEAR : 1838 -JESSIE – JENNET-JANET MCLEAN (later MCNEIL) ON THE BRILLIANT

 

1838
The BRILLIANT brought Scottish Bounty Immigrants including :
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL( later to become known as GRANNY BELL of LAURIETON, wife of the Invalid Mr John Bell. ) Janet was born in 1831 so she was only a child of 6-7 when she came. Her parents were JOHN MCLEAN and GRACE MCINNES(McGuiness)

The John Bells during the 1880s are said to have had a house at Palm Vale on the Tweed and the accident which invalided him. apparently rendering him unable to walk and preceding their removal to LAURIETON, took place in the sugar industry on the Tweed near CONDONG and TUMBULGUM.

Mary Ann married John  in 1878 in Taree.   

44691_family_md

 

immigration article4168774-3-001The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 17 November 1837, page 2 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4168774
The Hobart Town Courier Friday 17 November 1837 Supplement: Supplement to the Hobart Town Courier., page 2.

The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 5 January 1838, page 2
With the BRILLIANT due later in JANUARY.

BUNMORAH article4167785-3-001The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 5 January 1838, page 2

5ships_30588_md

JESSIE – JENNETT – JANET MCLEAN AND THE BRILLIANT 1838

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, October 14, 18372 EMBARKATION BRILLIANT

THIRD AND LAST EMBARKATION OF HIGHLANDERS TO AUSTRALIA FOR THE SEASON
Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, October 14, 1837; Issue 18331.

Ships to Australia 1837-39

From the British Parliamentary Papers of 1839 II – Respecting Emigration to the Colonies

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/au1838.htm

The Brilliant, a sailing ship of 428 tons, left Scotland for the Australian Colonies on September 27, 1837 and carried some 300 Scottish
people who were leaving their homeland under the bounty immigration system.

The selection was made by a selecting officer. 320 people embarked on the BRILLIANT and there was only one death recorded. The BRILLIANT was built in MONTREAL in 1834 and was 429 tons. She was taken up by the EMIGRATION DEPARTMENT on August 19 1837 in LEITH . The emigrants embarked in the HEBRIDES. The name of the owner was S PATERSON and she was hired at the rate of 4pounds 17/6 per ton.  A. Campbell was the Surgeon Superintendent on the voyage. The BRILLIANT departed on the 27 Sep 1837 and arrived in NSW on 27 Jan 1838. 126 days at sea with a touching at the Cape on 29 Nov 1837.
74 males.
84 females.
59 children between 14 and 7.
103 children under 7.
320 in total with 2 children born on the voyage.
The 1 death was that of a child.

"They Came in the Brilliant: A History of the McLaurin, McMee" Author: J. O. Randell

Title: They Came in the Brilliant: A History of the McLaurin, McMeekin and Paton Families
Publisher: Brown Prior Anderson Location: U.S.A.

From Log Of Logs, Vol.2. By Ian Nicholson
Brilliant, ship 428t, Gilkinson; Tobermory, Mull, 27/9 with 318 Highland
1837-1838 immigrants for Sydney.
+ Account of departure published in *Inverness Courier,
reproduced in
*Australian Biography & General Record, No. 15. (Sydney July
1990)

 

 

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-IMMIGRATION-SHIPS/2007-12/1197018234

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/australia1837.htm

 

Watterson Family http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~watterson/wattersonrootsweb.html

McLeod Family of Ulmarra

  • Letters published in Sydney Morning Herald in January 1838 regarding the voyage of the "Brilliant"

NSW State Records film # 1288 SCOTTISH BOUNTY MIGRANTS.

ON THE BRILLIANT 1837-1838

JOHN McGREGOR .

John, Elizabeth and their young family came to Australia in 1838 on the ship "Brilliant" and settled in the Williams River area. They later moved to the Clarence River district where John and Elizabeth resided for the remainder of their lives.

John McGregor died 28th August, 1888 at Ulmarra, NSW, and Elizabeth on 25th August, 1869, also at Ulmarra.

http://www.angelfire.com/bc/juliette/page4.html

MAY HOLS 08 006
ULMARRA 2008

404px-Queen_Victoria,_1838  

Meanwhile  Queen Victoria was being crowned as per following article

When Victoria Was Crowned; DESCRIPTION OF THE CORONATION OF 1838, BY AN EYE-WITNESS OF THE IMPOSING CEREMONIAL.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9F0CEED6103DEE32A25752C1A9639C946397D6CF

FROM THE CEMETERIES SITE OF GREAT LAKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM

http://greatlakeshistorical.museum.com/cemeteries.html
http://greatlakeshistorical.museum.com/krambach.html

Obituary notice.

Donald Cameron.

The death of Mr. Donald Cameron of Port Stephens of which the usual Obituary Notice was inserted in the "Empire" of Friday last deserves a more extended notice than it then and there received.

Mr. Cameron was a native of Ardnamurchan, Argyleshire, Scotland and was upwards of sixty years of age when he emigrated with his family to the colony per ship "Brilliant" which sailed from Tobar Mory in the Isle of Mull in the year 1838, being ninety years of age when he died on the 12th instant. READ ON

JANET/JENNETT MCLEAN ALSO SAILED FROM TOBER MORY IN THE ISLE OF MULL.

tobermory1

TOBER MORY BY JAMES WISEMAN http://www.jameswiseman.com/tobermory.php

OTHER MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT.
Allan McLean and Janet McFarlane

http://jamesobrien.id.au/genealogy/allan-mclean-and-janet-mcfarlane/

Inverness Courier Index 1837, p212

A large body of emigrants sailed from Tobermory on the 27th of September for New South Wales. The vessel was the Brilliant, and its size and splendid fittings were greatly admired. “the people to be conveyed by this vessel are decidedly the most valuable that have ever left the shores of Great Britain; they are all of excellent moral character, and from their knowledge of agriculture, and management of sheep and cattle, must prove a most valuable acquisition to a colony like New South Wales.” The Rev. Mr Macpherson, of Tobermory, preached a farewell sermon before the party sailed. The total number of emigrants was 322, made up as follows:—From Ardnamurchan and Strontian, 105; Coll and Tiree, 104; Mull and lona, 56; Morven, 25; Dunoon, 28; teachers, 2; surgeons, 2. A visitor from New South Wales presented as many of the party as he met with letters of introduction, and expressed himself highly gratified with the prospect of having so valuable an addition to the colony. A Government agent superintended the embarkation.

THERE are a lot of MCLEANS on this BRILLIANT trip of 1838.
Some of them include:

MCLEAN Allan 49
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Wife 40; boat builder

MCLEAN Allan 28
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Wife 20; shepherd

MCLEAN Allan 19
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Anne 18
Brilliant
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Anne 15
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; country servant

 

 

MORE MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT 1838

MCLEAN Archibald 22
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Archibald 16
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Bell 25 Brilliant
24/01/1838
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN Charles 36
Brilliant  24/01/1838 

Wife 35; farm servant

MORE MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT 1838

MCLEAN Donald 28 Brilliant
Wife 30; mason

MCLEAN Donald 30
Brilliant
Wife 28; farm servant

MCLEAN Dugald 30
Unmarried; fam overseer

MCLEAN Ellen 20
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Hugh 23
Unmarried; shepherd

MCLEAN Isabella 20
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN James 16
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Janet 18
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Janet 29
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN John 32
Wife 28; farm servant

MCLEAN John 32
Wife 27; farm servant

MCLEAN Marion 68
Widow; farm housekeeper

MCLEAN Mary 27
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN Roderick 35
Wife 35; farm servant

MCLEAN Roderick 30
Wife 22; farm servant

article2550732-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 27 January 1838

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 27 January 1838

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550732

brilliant article2550113-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1838, page 3
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1838, page 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550113

   

 

article2547105-3-002brilliantbrilliant 

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 3 February 1838, page 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2547105

   

 

SARAH ANN READY ( BENSON) & GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

image 

0 2 sarah & george moore 19th C

SARAH ANN READY (BENSON)

1830-1910

GEORGE MOORE Jnr

1828 -1903

PHIL of READY OR NOT has now sent me an email in response to my request to use his research online. PERMISSION GRANTED said Phil only recently back in Action  after a nasty accident. It was years of work and travel and research that provided the information on the READY line for this generation. PERMISSION GRANTED.  A very gracious response indeed. Phil is currently at work on his Index and updates on READY OR NOT.

from ready or not ; following the death of Peter Mark Ready on the Goldfields of Victoria. Following on from

PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON ON THE GOLDFIELDS

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/07/27/peter-mark-ready-and-sarah-ann-benson-on-the-goldfields/

SARAH ANN (BENSON) READY and GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

Faced with the problem of survival, and with 5 young children to feed, on the 30th October 1863, Peter Mark Ready’s widow, SARAH READY, took the only acceptable course open to her. At the age of 31, 16 months after her husband’s death, she married 35 year old GEORGE MOORE, born in 1828 in SYDNEY to GEORGE MOORE Snr and ANN TRACEY. ( Vol 63 no 897 RGI )

GEORGE MOORE’s relationship to the family before the tragedy is not known but he seems to have been a close friend. Soon after the death of PETER MARK READY, he brought the family back to NSW for it would have been an unhappy reminder to all if they had remained. The fact that George had paid for the funeral and married Sarah the following year, taking on 5 children at the same time says something of his regard for them.

 

GEORGE SENIOR AND ANN TRACEY. George Jnr’s father, GEORGE MOORE Snr, was a 19 year old carpenter who had been living at Newcastle, England , when he was sentenced at his trial on 24 October 1821 to a life sentence and transportation to NSW. Arriving aboard the ASIA II on 24 July 1822, he was assigned to work for SOLOMON LEVY in SYDNEY and in 1826 received permission from the Governor to marry. His marriage to ANN TRACEY who had come free to the Colony, took place on 5 February 1827 and over the next 24 years they had a family of three sons. GEORGE 1828. HENRY 1832  WILLIAM 1842.and a daughter MARY in 1851. George had received a conditional pardon from the Governor in 1837 and lived until 17 April 1883.

 

GEORGE MOORE Jnr and SARAH settled down in SYDNEY and three years later a son WILLIAM THOMAS MOORE was born, the first of their three children. A daughter ESMA was born in 1870 and the last of their children HENRY THOMAS MOORE was born in 1874.

Seeing an opening, GEORGE MOORE Jnr set up as a PRODUCE MERCHANT at 165 Sussex Street Sydney with the family residence at 92 GLEBE STREET, GLEBE. it was here in this area that the children went to school and grew to maturity until on the 4th April 1874, Sarah Ann Ready married WILLIAM HENRY WATSON, a blacksmith from NEW ZEALAND. Four years later, in 1878, her sister ELIZABETH HANNAH READY, married JOHN SMITH and on the 10 June 1879, three months before the establishment of the first steam trams in Sydney, the last of PETER MARK READY’S daughters CATHERINE LOUISA was married to JOSEPH HOWE.

1897 saw the marriage of HENRY MOORE their younger half brother to ELLEN MCPHEE, setting up home across the road from his parents at No 75 GLEBE ROAD GLEBE. Esma Moore appears not to have married.

At the time GEORGE MOORE died , Sarah and he were living in no 94 Glebe Road Glebe, the house next door to their original home. it was here that Sarah died on 17 October 1910. Their graves are in the Church of England Section of Rookwood Cemetery along with the body of one of Sarah’s grandchildren FREDERICK BENSON READY.

There is some evidence that SARAH and PETER MARK READY may have quarrelled on the night so long before when he was killed, for a saying has come down through their daughter Sarah Ann Watson’s branch of the family ;

“ NEVER SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR HUSBAND IN ANGER FOR HE MAY FALL DOWN A MINE.”

SARAH ANN(BENSON) READY m 30/10/1883 GEORGE MOORE JNR
WILLIAM THOMAS
1865-1872
ESMA
1868
HENRY THOMAS
1874-19??
M ELLEN MCPHEE

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

FROM MARILYN;  George Moore married Sarah Ann Ready in Sydney not Victoria, have a marriage transcript and it says Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth St, Sydney, witnesses Henry Samuels (step father) and Jane Samuels!!  Hadn’t noticed before but this must be a half sister, but is she ‘Jane’ or ‘Hannah’.

Their 3rd child, Henry Thomas Moore who married Ellen McPhee, then their 2nd child Leslie Francis Moore who married Gladys May Robinson, then their 1st child Gladys Ivy Moore who married , Allen William Roberts

TRIAL OF GEORGE MOORE SENIOR

GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS, GEORGE MOORE, Theft > pocketpicking, 24th October 1821.

Reference Number: t18211024-151
Offence: Theft ; pocketpicking
Verdict: Guilty; Guilty
Punishment: Transportation

FROM TRIALS OF THE OLD BAILEY ONLINE http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18211024-151-defend1366&div=t18211024-151#highlight

1324. GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS and GEORGE MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of James Larbalesher , from his person .

JAMES LARBALESHER . On Monday last, between twelve and one o’clock at night, I was at the corner of Hatton-garden , coming home with my wife, several people passed near me, I felt and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner Lewis give it to a woman. I took him and the woman. Moore came up and said, "What have you to do with this woman, she has nothing of yours." I called the watch and took Moore too as an accomplice; he endeavoured to escape, but I pursued and took him. I do not know what became of the woman. I am sure I saw it in Lewis’s hand.

BENJAMIN RUSHBROOK . I was parting from a few friends at the corner of Hatton-garden. I heard a bustle, and saw Moore lay hold of the prosecutor, and say "What have you to do with this woman, she has no handkerchief of yours." The prosecutor took him, the woman escaped with the handkerchief.

THOMAS BARTLET . The prisoners were given in my charge.

LEWIS’S Defence. I was out of employ and was distressed, my parents having a large family I did not like to live on them, which caused me to keep late hours. I humbly implore mercy.

MORRIS’S Defence. I got intoxicated and shoved one of these gentlemen, but what else I did I cannot say. I was in the woman’s company.

LEWIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

MORRIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

EMIGRATION 1848

Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, May 2, 1850

 

 

1848 EMIGRATION Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, May 2, 1850 ass emig The Bristol Mercury (Bristol, England), Saturday, June 24, 1854; Issue 3353.

 

 

EMIGRANTS FROM THE FAMILY :

YEAR SHIP NAME
1838 BRILLIANT JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL
1839 JAMES MORAN MCLEODS AND MACKAYS
1849 VICTORIA WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS
1853 WILLIAM BROWN JACKSONS
1853 BEEJAPORE CRAIGS AND HURRELLS

BELLINGER BITS AND PIECES

http://electronicquill.wordpress.com/2008/10/12/odds-and-ends-on-a-sunday/

48 10 honeymoon urunga 48 13 honeymoon

Joyce and Bruce Sanders honeymooned in Urunga at the mouth of the Bellinger River in 1948. In the 1970s Lynne,Susan and Jon as well as Joyce and Bruce and Susan’s daughter Josefine relocated from Belmore in Sydney to Urunga. The Bellinger then became home to children, grandchildren and husbands. Susan married into the POMROY family of URUNGA and Lynne married into the BRAITHWAITE family of Bellingen.

For today – odds and ends of BELLINGEN in the NLA.

http://electronicquill.wordpress.com/2008/10/12/odds-and-ends-on-a-sunday/

AUSTRALIAN FLOTILLA

           http://www.morpeth-p.schools.nsw.edu.au/History.htm

 

          Minor shipping lines and Ship owners  registered in NEW SOUTH WALES

GALLOWGATE GLASGOW IN THE 1830s

vkgc_misc100

HOMETOWN OF JAMES BELL. TRIED THERE FOR HOUSEBREAKING IN 1830 AND TRANSPORTED ON THE YORK ARRIVING IN NSW IN FEB 1831.

GLASGOW MAILS Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, March 19, 1832; Issue 17262.

CALEDONIAN MERCURY MONDAY MARCH 19 1832

GALLOWGATE2he Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, September 10, 1831; Issue 8172.

NEWCASTLE COURANT SATURDAY SEP 10 1831

YORK SAILS2 Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, October 4, 1830; Issue 1617.

HAMPSHIRE TELEGRAPH AND SUSSEX CHRONICLE MONDAY OCT 4 1830

___________________________________________________________________

THE YORK 1831

(NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH THE HULK YORK IN ENGLAND)

Convict Ship arrivals – 1831http://www.historyaustralia.org.au/twconvic/tiki-print.php?page=1831

 

SHIP           MASTER        SURGEON               DEPARTED   ARRIVED    MALE CONVICTS FEMALE CONVICTS

York 1831  Leary, Dan.  France, Campbell  Sheerness     Sydney       200                      0

 

(http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/shipNSW2.html
Vessel              Arrived    Port    Sailed      From     Days   Embarked   Sydney    Hobart  Norfolk I    Master               Surgeon
                                                                               M    F    M    F    M    F    M    F
York I (2)         07 02 1831  NSW   04 09 1830  Sheerness   156   200        198                          Dan Leary              Campbell France

 

York I (2) transported only 8 male Irish convicts http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/ships.htm

 

Feb. 8.-YORK (ship), 478 tons, Leary master, from London, Campbell & Co. agents; 198 male prisoners and government stores.)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199042

 

CONVICTS ON BOARD:

CARLISLE James York 1831

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198935

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 8 February 1831, page 2.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1931.

Monday Evening.

The York has brought English news to the last week in September. We have now before us London papers to the 27th of that month, and the first intelligence we have to announce is of a most painful nature, being the sudden DEATH OF MR. HUSKISSON

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198936

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 8 February 1831, page 2. News

Shipping Intelligence

ARRIVALS.

From New Zealand, on Sunday last, the schooner Currency Lass, with 80 tons flax.

From Newcastle, same day, the cutter Fairy.

From London, yesterday, whence she sailed the 4th of September, and from Portsmouth the 29th, the ship York (429 tons), Captain Leary, with 200 male prisoners, 2 having died on the passage. Surgeon Superintendent, Campbell France, Esq. The guard consists of 40 non-commissioned officers and privates of the 17th Regiment, who are accompanied by 4 women and 2 children. Passengers, Colonel Despard, 17th Regt., Mrs. Despard and 3 children, Ensign Owen, and Ann Forster and C. Donohoe, servants to Mrs. Despard.

REMAINING IN THE HARBOUR.

SHIPS.- Louisa, Forth, Nancy, Royal Admiral, Clarkstone, Sir George Murray, Dryade, Denmark Hill, Mary Ann, Andromeda, Burrell, Janet hat, Vittoria, Elizabeth, Albion, Resource, and York.

BRIGs.-Elizabeth, Wellington, Norval, Couvier Thistle, Governor Phillip, and Lord Rodney.

SCHOONERS- Henry, Resolution, Admiral Gifford, Schnapper, Darling, New Zealander, and Currency Lass.

CUTTERS-Emma, Fairy, and Letitia Bingham.
Total.-Ships, 17 ; Brigs, 7 ; Schooners, 7 ;  Cutter, 3 ; in all, 34.

 

NEWS OF THE YORK 1831

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198965 The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 10 February 1831, page 2.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198968

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 10 February 1831, page 2.

We are requested to correct a mistake which occurred in the notice of the arrival of the ship York (Captain Leary) in our last number. The burthen of the York is there stated to be 429 tons, instead of 478 tons, as appears by the register, -which we bave seen. This vessel is not the old York, as some persons, we are informed, suppose.; but was built, in the year 1819, at Southwick, in Durham. Captain Leary, the commander, is an old and much respected visitant to this colony.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199140

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 19 February 1831, page 2.

The male prisoners by the York were landed yesterday morning. Among them are a considerable number of strong healthy labourers accustomed to agriculture, who will doubtless prove no small acquisition to the settlers who may obtain them. There are also several good mechanics and tradesmen.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199405

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 5 March 1831, page 2

The second division of the 57th regiment, will embark on board the York, for Madras, next Thursday.

The following is the ‘ Return ‘ of a detachment of the 57th Regiment, to embark

on board the ship York, on Saturday next,

for Madras :

Major R. Hunt, Captain J. Brown, lady,
and family ; Lieut. G. Edwards, Lieut. R.
Alexander, Lieut. E. Lockyer, Paymaster
G. H. Green, lady, and family ; 9 Serjeants,
J 2 drummers, 7 corporals, 132′ privates,

15 women, and 39 children.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199723

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 24 March 1831, page 2.

Attempt at Robbery.-A seaman
belonging to the ship York, having just come ashore
on Saturday evening with ten dollars in his pocket,
was stopped by two fellows opposite the Dock-yard,
who knocked him down, ond then commenced ful-
filling their intentions on his pockets. Jack how-

ever was not disposed to strike, although boarded on
both sides, and defended himself manfully, till Dowd,
with some other constables, came to his assistance,
on whose approach the villains decamped with all
possible expedition, leaving the tar in possession of
all his shot, and cursing them for a couple of lub

belly rascals.

 

YORK 2 article2199895-3-001

DON’T MISS THIS STORY READ ON : http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199895  The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 5 April 1831, page 2.

AND THEN THE POSTCRIPT;

[ POSTSCRIPT, 9 o’CIock, P. M.

_____________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199991

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 9 April 1831, page 2. News

RETURN OF THE YORK,

We have to announce the gratifying
news of the safe return to port of the ship
York, together with the equally pleasing
intelligence that the apprehensions for

the safety of the crew, which a chain of
circumstances occasioned in the public
mind, turn out to be altogether ground
less. She anchored yesterday evening
about dusk, in Watson’s Bay, the passen
gers and crew all well. From the hasty
particulars which we have been enabled
to glean, it appears that her parting from
the Edward was occasioned by a strong
northerly wind, which induced Captain
Leary to alter his course, and endeavour
to make the passage through Bass’ Straits
When the ship was hailed by Captain
Gilbert, from the Edward, the wind was
so high, that nothing more than a con.
fused sound could be distinguished on

board, and, being unable to lay-to, she
proceeded on her course : the wind
subsequently veered to the southward
and, after beating about the straits for
several days, Captain Leary thought it
most advisable to return to Sydney. We
are most happy at being thus enabled
satisfactorily to allay the ferment which
a rumour so astounding in all the alleged
circumstances which gave rise to it, was
calculated to excite, not only in this Co.
lony, but in every part of the British
dominions to which it might reach.

 

FURTHER TO THE POSTCRIPT

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200039

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 12 April 1831, page 2.

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, LAST.

RETURN OF THE YORK.

We had the heartfelt satisfaction of
announcing in our last, in a hasty Post-
script, the safe return to port of the ship
York, which was supposed, from Captain
Gilbert’s strange story, to have been
piratically seized by the troops she was

conveying to Madras. We must now
give some explanation on the other side,
as derived from the very best authority.

On Sunday, the 27th ult., Captain
Leary, of the York, dined with Captain
Gilbert on board the Edward, and re-
turned to his own ship in the evening,
after arranging for the signals to be made
during that night. This was the last per-
sonal intercourse they had. The wind

was then N. E.

On Monday, the 28th, no communica-
tions took place, “and the wind continued
steady from the N. E.

On Tuesday, the 29th (the memorable
day on which Captain Gilbert supposed
the York to be captured), about 3 o’clock
in the afternoon, Captain Leary, find-
ing the wind so unchangeably contrary,
began to think seriously of putting

ONCE AGAIN. READ ON THIS IS A GRAND STORY.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200039

 

AND THEN THE YORK RETURNS TO SYDNEY AGAIN

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200161

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 19 April 1831, page 2

RETURN OF THE YORK AGAIN!

OUR good friend the York, has visited
us yet once again, having this time en-
countered dangers of no imaginary or
trifling order. She put back on Sunday,
with her rigging a good deal damaged.
The tremendous hurricane of Saturday

night and Sunday morning, was enough
to have foundered the stoutest ship that
ever floated, and when we remember that
it was from the south-east, and how near
the York was to an iron-bound lee-shore,
we may judge how imminent was her
danger, and how providential her escape.
But of this our readers will form a more
adequate conception by the subjoined
extract of a letter from one of the pas-
sengers, written to his friend in Sydney,
immediately after anchoring in Watson’s
Bay.

” You must be a little surprised to “find us
here again : the fears entertained for our
safety on the former occasion were more
sensibly felt by ourselves on this. We
sailed yesterday morning, with a fine wind
from the S.W., the weather looking very
dark and unsettled. About ten o’clock it
changed all round the compass, and at last
settled in the South-East, and increased to
a gale, accompanied with the most awful
thunder, lightning, and the heaviest rain I
ever witnessed, which continued the whole
of the day, and the sea ran to an immense
height. Our fore-top-sail-yard was carried
away-I rather think struck by lightning
the top-sail and two or three other sails

blown to ribbands : two of our boats stove
in. About two o’clock in the morning Cap-
tain Leary came to me, and said it was
necessary to have an additional number of
hands on deck-not that there was any im-
minent danger, but that we were on a lee
shove, and the ship having lost her head
sails, consequently was not easily worked
off. Every assistance was of course af-
forded ; and I am happy to have it in my
power to state to you that no men could

behave better, notwithstanding they had
not a dry shirt to their backs for 24 hour.
As far as my own opinion goes, I feel con-
vinced that his own crew would never have
been able to save the ship from going on
shore, as we were close to the land to the
southward of the Light-house, and the sea
running mountains high. However, thank
divine Providence, we got in as soon as day-
light would permit him to approach the
entrance to the Heads. I am happy to state
how grateful we all feel for Captain Leary’s
zeal and exertions; he never quitted the
deck the whole time; and but for his
thorough knowledge and experience as a
seaman, I really believe we should not have
survived to tell the tale. Our miseries did
not end here ; we bumped two or three
times on the bank at the Sow-and-Pigs.
I hope the ship has not suffered any mate-
rial injury, but it will be as well to have that
ascertained before we make another trial.”

We once more congratulate these brave
troops on their safety, hoping that after
all these untoward events, they will en-
joy a quick and pleasant passage to the
place of destination.

 

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 26 April 1831, page 3 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200267 The York is immediately to be hove down, in order to her undergoing a thorough repair, previously to proceeding to sea once more. She cannot, therefore, leave this spot before the expiration of a month at least. The troops disembarked yesterday morning, and marched hack to their old quarters, looking like any thing but pirates, poor fellows !

 

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 28 April 1831, page 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200302 The detachment of the 57th Regiment, which disembarked from the York on Monday, proceeded to Parramatta, and not to their old quarters,” as we erroneously stated on Tuesday. ‘

 

AND TO FINISH IT OFF FOR THE YORK IN 1831, THE EDITOR OF THE GAZEETE PERHAPS COULD HAVE BEEN A LITTLRE MORE COMPASSIONATE TO THE POET ON THE YORK.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200162

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 19 April 1831, page 2.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

We thank H. H. for his ‘Dream’, which will be

published in a day or two.

The lines written on board the York are not well measured.

J’s ‘ Lines written during the Thunder-storm on

Saturday last, will probably appear in our next.

____________________________________________________________________

SITES TO SEE RE THE YORK:

http://www.jenwilletts.com/Convict%20Ships.htm CONVICT SHIPS JEN WILLETTS

 

Convicts http://www.coraweb.com.au/convict.htm

 

Prison Hulk Records usually giving the names of convicts http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-PT-JACKSON-CONVICTS/2008-07/1215427845

 

CONVICTS TO AUSTRALIA http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/stories.html

 

Ballarat & District Genealogical Society –
Advice for Locating Convict Information  http://www.ballaratgenealogy.org.au/convicts.htm

 

http://www.geocities.com/pennytrueman/chstrans.html 

Joseph IKIN, 35, b. CHS, M, Ploughs, Reaps, Milks, Sows; T: 1831 from Sheerness to Sydney NSW, Ship: York.

John TAYLOR, 23, b. CHS, S, Wheelwright, T: 1831 from Sheerness to Sydney NSW, Ship: York.

 

EVENTS OF 1831 http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1831.htm

 

 

The People’s Health

By Milton James Lewis

 

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RANDOM SITES

RE SANDERS:

The Last Farewell

Devon Convicts Transported to Australia 1782 – 1821

 http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/DevonIndexes/LastFarewell.html

 

DEVON

http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/index.html

“A county of England, reaching from the Bristol to the English Channel, and bounded by Cornwall, and Somersetshire, and Dorsetshire. It is 69 miles in length, and 60 in breadth, and is divided into 31 hundreds. It is very hilly, and abounds in huge granite rocks, some of whose peaks are above 1500 feet in height. The highland is covered with wide moors, of which Dartmoor is the most extensive. But in the valleys and lower ground the soil is fertile. Its rivers are the Exe, the Culm, the Dart, the Tamar, the Otter, &c. Some parts of its coasts are composed of lofty cliffs, but at others there is a beautiful sandy shore. The air and climate are so mild and salubrious that invalids often retire to its sea-ports for the winter. Limestone, granite, some building-stone, and a species of wood-coal are found here, as well as some kinds of variegated marble. It produces corn, &c. and fruit trees, especially apples, whence much cider is made. Its fisheries also are of value. Exeter is its chief city. Population, 533, 460. It sends 22 members to parliament.” (From Barclay’s Complete and Universal English Dictionary, 1842.)

HISTORICAL TIMELINE

Compiled by Anne Mavric  http://home.vicnet.net.au/~pioneers/pppg10.htm

AHA ! MCLEODS AND MACKAYS ON THE JAMES MORAN

JAMES BELL ,28, from Gallowsgate , Glasgow , Scotland transported for housebreaking. Tried in Glasgow. 7 years. Arrived on the YORK on 7-2-1831. Assigned to Paterson River. Certificate of freedom – 9.8.1838

WILHELMINA MCLEOD emigrated from Sutherland Shire Scotland, with her mother JANET MACKAY , two sisters and a brother on the JAMES MORAN arriving Sydney 11-2-1839. The family moved to the Hunter.

James and  Wilhelmina married on 29-9-1840  at the Scots Church Paterson.

THERE WE ARE ! What a difference one letter makes. Forget the WAVERLEY except for general interest. The ship we are looking for is the JAMES MORAN which arrived in SYDNEY in FEBRUARY 1839.

banner_28638_lg

THE MACKAY FAMILY STORY

 

The James Moran, a ship of 600 tons, sailed under Captain Ferguson and Dr McNee. It left Loch Inver and Loch Broom, on 21st October, 1838, and arrived at Port Jackson on the 11th February 1839. When it arrived, 210 passengers disembarked, including infants born on the voyage
Most of the 229 passengers on board were clearance victims. They came to Australia under Rev John Dunmore Lang’s Bounty Scheme. 2 people died on the voyage to Australia. The voyage took 113 days, sailing directly to Cape Town, where it arrived 26th December, 1838. 20 passengers left the ship there on New Year’s Day. The Jamnes Moran was apparently lost in the ice of the North Atlantice ca. 1857.
NOTE: “clearance victims”. For those interested – there is an excellent book called “The Highland Clearances” By John Prebbles.  One should be able to get it via a library.

     James Moran Passengers 

Most of the 229 passengers on board were clearance victims. They came to Australia under Rev John Dunmore Lang’s Bounty Scheme. 2 people died on the voyage to Australia. The voyage took 113 days, sailing directly to Cape Town, where it arrived 26th December, 1838. 20 passengers left the ship there on New Year’s Day.

      2 of the 18 single female passengers on the “James Moran”

Surname
Christian Name
Native Place
Calling
Age
Religion
By whom engaged
Wages
Per day, week or year
Whether with or without rations

Name
Address
Pounds
Shillings
Pence

McLeod
Whilimima
Sutherlandshire
Servant
16
Presbyterian
Mr David McKenzie
15


Year
With

McKay
Janet
Sutherlandshire
Servant
41?
Presbyterian
Not stated

 

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2548299

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 12 February 1839, page 3. News

By the James Moran we receive the
following information. The British
King, with emigrants for this Port, was

to leave Lochenvar on the 1st November.

The Christina and Potentate were laid
on at Greenock, with merchandise for
this Colony ; also the Meta, Walker, via
the Mauritius. The Asia, with emigrants,
left Simons’ Bay, for this Port, two days
previous to the James Moran. The
James Moran spoke the Medusa in Bass’
Straits on the 9lh instant, bound to Java,
10 days from Sydney.

  • Articles were published in the Grafton “Daily Examiner” by G. Dennes dealing with Clarence River families who had come out 100 years earlier from Scotland on the “William Nicol, Midlothian, Brilliant, St George, Boyne, James Moran and Lady MacNaughton” The original bound copies of the :Daily Examiner” are held at the Clarence River Historical Society in Grafton.Some early copies are in microfiche. Enquire at your nearest library with a F.H.Section.  http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nswbelli/transcripts/publications.html

 

Ship, Scottish Port of Origin and Date of Arrival in NSW
‘John Barry’ from Dundee 13/07/1837 ‘Hero’ from Leith 26/9/1839
‘William Nicol’ from Isle of Skye 27/10/1837 ‘Ariadne’ from Greenock 29/9/1839
‘Portland’ from Greenock 3/12/1837 ‘Glenswilly’ from Greenock 28/10/1839
‘Midlothian’ from Isle of Skye 12/12/1837 ‘Palmyra’ from Greenock 15/12/1839
‘Minerva’ from Greenock 23/01/1838 ‘Superb’ from Greenock 16/1/1840
‘Brilliant’ from Isle of Mull 24/01/1838 ‘Charlotte’ from Leith 19/1/1840
‘Duncan’ from Greenock 30/06/1838 ‘George Fyffe’ from Tobermory 25/1/1840
‘Lady Kennaway’ from Leith 12/08/1838 ‘Portland’ from Greenock 7/2/1840
‘William Rodger’ from Greenock 26/09/1838 ‘Henry Porcher’ from Isle of Skye 21/2/1840
‘Saint George’ from Oban, Scotland 15/11/1838 ‘Isabella Watson’ from Leith 20/9/1840
‘Portland’ from Greenock 22/12/1838 ‘Perfect’ from Greenock 26/12/1840
‘Boyne’ from Cromarty 2/01/1839 ‘Herald’ from Greenock 15/7/1841
‘Catherine Jamieson’ from Leith 19/01/1839 ‘Percy’ from Greenock 28/8/1841
‘Lady McNaughton’ from Cromarty 28/01/1839 ‘James Moran’ from Greenock 6/10/1841
‘James Moran’ from Loch Inver 11/2/1839 ‘New York Packet’ from Greenock 23/10/1841
‘British King’ from Tobermory 28/2/1839 ‘Trinidad’ from Greenock 6/11/1841
‘Asia’ from Cromarty 10/5/1839

ARCHIBALD REYNOLDS http://www.monaropioneers.com/reynolds-a.htm

Archibald married Flora Fraser, daughter of William Thomas Fraser and Catherine McGregor, September 21, 1840 in Jerrabomberra, NSW.3 Flora was born in 1815 in Lochbroom, Rosshire, Scotland, was baptised April 12, 1816 in Lochbroom, Rosshire, Scotland, died September 18, 1911 in “Kyloe” Adaminaby, NSW 4 at age 96, and was buried in Adaminaby Old Cemetery, Adaminaby, NSW.

More about Flora :

• Arrived: per ship ‘James Moran’, assisted immigrant, February 11, 1839, Sydney, NSW.

 

          the story of William Munro & Ann MacKay who came to Australia on the James Moran in 1839.

 

 

 

 

JANET MACKAY AND WILHELMINA MCLEOD ON THE WAVERLEY

arrow_16061_lg

(CHECK DATES AND NAMES: INFORMATION FROM TWEED HISTORICAL SOCIETY;

JAMES BELL ,28, from Gallowsgate , Glasgow , Scotland transported for housebreaking. Tried in Glasgow. 7 years. Arrived on the YORK on 7-2-1831. Assigned to Paterson River. Certificate of freedom – 9.8.1838

WILHELMINA MCLEOD emigrated from Sutherland Shire Scotland, with her mother JANET MACKAY , two sisters and a brother on the JAMES MORGAN arriving Sydney 11-2-1839. The family moved to the Hunter.

James and  Wilhelmina married on 29-9-1840  at the Scots Church Paterson.)

The only records I have so far found are as below but its later than February. Best visit BB again and set my thinking straight. In the meantime;

 

JAMES MORGAN MASTER

SHIP Waverley (1) ARRIVED NSW 17.6.1839

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549022

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 14 May 1839, page 2.

The Mellish sailed from the Downs on
the 17th January, with a cargo of mer-
chandise for this port. Her agents are
Messrs. Hughes and Hosking.

The Whitby cleared outwards on the
12th January, and the Waverley on the
16th in ballast ; both for Sydney. In

all probability they bring either emigrants

or convicts.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2551381

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 18 June 1839, page 3. News

The Whitby, Captain Melbank, sailed
from Dublin, with female prisoners,
bound to Sydney, four days previous to
the Waverley.

The Waverley spoke the Lady Bute,

from Greenock, bound to South Aus
tialia and Sydney, with merchandise and
passengers, on the 3d May, in lat. 38 °
45′ S., long. 25 50′ E.-all well ; and,
on the 4th May, spoke the Ann Watson,
from Bristol, bound to Launceston and

Sydney, with merchandise and passen-
gers-all well.

SYDNEY GAZETTE.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2551380

TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 1839.

English Intelligence.

By the Waverley, with male convicts
from Ireland, we have received London
papers to the 18th February, inclusive.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549645

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 20 June 1839, page 2

The Waverley and Indemnity are advertised for freight or charter.

 

EXPORTS.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549648

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 20 June 1839, page 2.

THE WAVERLEY.-Among the convicts
arrived by the Waverley is Carrick, the
Roman Catholic Monk, whose trial and
conviction on a charge of torturing a
child to death created a strong excitement
in Ireland some eight or nine months

since. The Roman Catholics not being
quite so powerful at head quarters as they
were in the time of Sir Richard Bourke,
when another special who shall be name-
less, was brought to Sydney and allowed
to go at large, we presume Carrick will
be forwarded to Port Macquarie forth-
with, or sent to vegetate on Cockatoo

Island.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2546850

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 25 June 1839, page 2

The CONVICT BARRACKS.-On Satur-
day last His Excellency the Governor
visited the Prisoners’ Barracks, Hyde
Park, for the purpose of inspecting the
convicts who arrived by the Waverley.
The names of the men were called over,

and they were ranged round His Excel-
lency in a circle, when he explained to
them the situation in which they were
placed in regard to the term of probation
they were required to serve before being
assigned to private service, and the
rewards held out to them, by indulgences,
for good behaviour.

 

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2537911

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 23 July 1839, page 3.

Vessels cleared from the 13th to the 20th instant

inclusive

July 13-WAVERLEY, 436 tons, Morgan,

master, for India, in ballast.

 

  • Richard GILBERT, 22, Soldier, b. SAL, T: from Dublin 22/02/1839 to Sydney NSW17/06/1839, Ship: Waverley 1.

 

 

 

     

  • Guide to Using the ARK – Musters & Other Papers
  • Waverley (1) 1839 p.1

    Receipts for prisoners etc; and Chief Justice’s Warrants for Military prisoners

     

  • I am including this snippet due to the Bell name being linked with a WAVERLEY trip South. Wilhelmina Mcleod married James Bell. 
  • WINDUSS family – Tasmania and Victoria, Australia

John WINDUSS was born in December 1809 at Otterburn, Yorkshire, England and married Mary BELL. John belonged to the 96th Regiment and arrived in Hobart on 21st September 1841 on the ship “Waverley” with wife Mary.
As with the TEVELEIN family I have found most WINDUSS names in Tasmania and Victoria are connected to John and Mary and there are also WINDUSS descendants of John and Mary in Western Australia and New Zealand.
http://www.flexi.net.au/~rkbt/more_research.html

____________________________________________________________

While I’m at this one – research to date indicates that WILLIAM and ELIZABETH JACKSON came on WILLIAM BROWN SCHOONER in 1853. Looking at records I find that the BEEJAPORE ( see also CRAIGS AND HURRELLS) which arrived in 1853, brought a number of JACKSONS and was clearly an emigrant ship which the WILLIAM BROWN was not.

Note to self. FOLLOW THROUGH ON THESE RECORDS. NSW STATE ARCHIVES

JACKSON
Elizabeth
32
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Elizabeth
dv
1
and family
Beejapore
1853
2464

JACKSON
Elizabeth
5
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
William
7
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Marianne
10
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

ACKSON
Mary
bv
inft
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Susan
30
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Susan
3
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Thomas
bv
inft
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Robert
32
and family
Beejapore

JACKSON
James
39
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
James
12
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
James
9
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
George T
2
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Henry
32
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________

QUIRKS ON THE VICTORIA 1849. WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS ARRIVED AS ASSISTED EMIGRANTS ON VICTORIA 1849

http://www.baker1865.com/quirk.htm

Peter Quirke (1798-1863)- arrived on board the Ship Neptune in 1854

  • Arrived with wife Mary and five children in 1854.
  • Farm labourer, the son of James QUIRKE and Alice QUIRKE née REID, was born at St Johnswell ,Kilkenny Ireland in 1798.

  • He married Catherine RYAN in Kilkenny, Ireland circa 1823. The marriage producing four children.

    • James  QUIRK (c. 1824-dec.),

    • Nicholas (c. 1825-c. 1835), Arrived in NSW on board the Ship Victoria in 1849, he married Mary McMahon

    • Margaret QUIRK (c. 1828-1915),  – Arrived in NSW on board the Ship Victoria in 1849,  she Married George Fell in 1855 and died at Waverley in 1915.

    • Michael Quirk (c1832)

JAMES MORGAN AND WILLIAM BROWN

5ships_30588_md

SHIPS AT SEA ( NOT OUR SHIPS. JUST SHIPS )

ozmariners@ozlists.com ozmariners@ozlists.com

_________________________________________________________

WILHELMINA MCLEOD AND SIBLINGS WITH THEIR MOTHER JANET MACKAY IN 1839 and THE JACKSONS ON THE WILLIAM B BROWN IN 1853.

I stumbled across a classified advertisement in an 1839 Gazette for the ship WAVERLEY. I had been looking for the JAMES MORGAN on which I had been told that Wilhelmina and family travelled . It appears now that JAMES MORGAN is the Master’s name and the ship on which they immigrated is the WAVERLEY.

THE WAVERLEY seems also to be carrying Irish convicts so I shall begin looking. The Mcleods and Mackays are registered as from the SUTHERLAND SHIRE of SCOTLAND and coming as immigrants.

Finding that curly one caused me to wonder about the WILLIAM BROWN. I thought that might also have been the Master’s name rather than that of the ship. In fact it is the name of the Schooner and of the owner who, as you will see below, also becomes Master.

 

gse_multipart39203

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly.

 

MARY ANNE WARNER provides this detailed site. I just found the WILLIAM B BROWN on it. The schooner on which the JACKSONS came free in 1853. Mary Anne has a gracious way of dealing with things which I envy and a knack of saying thanks to her helpers which I lack. Great Site.

 

AND FROM NLA. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article667247  The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 21 May 1853, page 2. News

The William Barry Brown, schooner, left
Honolulu 17th February, and called at Strong’s
Island. The crew of the Paragon, whaler of

Nantucket, Captain Nelson, were there, that
vessel having been wrecked on the outer reef on
the 20th March ; she had been out 27 months,
with 400 barrels, and part of the crew came on

to Sydney in the schooner. On account of some
misunderstanding existing between Captain
White, who commanded the William Barry
Brown,on her leaving Honolulu, and Mr. Brown

the owner, Captain While was left at Strong’s
Island.

 

globe_sm

 

_________________________________________________________

KERSWELL COAT OF ARMS COURTESY MIKE AND SHORT KERSWELL FAMILY HISTORY.

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-family-crest-coat-arms.html

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-coat-of-arms.html

 

LOOK FOR SUSANNAH KERSWELL

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne’s-heritage-web-site

SOME MORE SANDERS STORY FROM JAN AND BARRY MAURICE

1. WILLIAM SANDERS m SARAH STARK c 1768 probably at Tifford outside KENTON near EXETER DEVON.

2. Their son  WILLIAM was baptised on 11/11/1792 at Tifford and was probably born the same day or the day before according to the custom of the time. He later married ELIZABETH GREEN. Their son :

3. WILLIAM was born at KENTON on 15/4/1823. He married MARY ANN SKIVINGS who was born in 1830. Mary’s parents were both born at KILLERTON ( also known as Broad Clyst) near EXETER, Devon.  Her mother, GRACE, was born in 1804. William and Mary  arrived in Sydney on board the VICTORIA on 2/9/1849, Mary possibly pregnant with their first ( surviving ) child.

They settled in the MACLEAY DISTRICT. Oral history has it that William was invited to come to Australia by a retired British Army Colonel to be employed as an expert ploughman having become known as such back in Devon. William is also reputed to have introduced blackberries to the North Coast. This act of folly earned him the nickname ” BLACKBERRY BILL”. William was also a champion rower and rowed in the Kempsey Regatta of 1856. William died on 19/12/1910 aged 87. Mary died on 13/11/1882 aged 52, the mother of 13 children.

Husband    WILLIAM SANDERS   

Birth    Apr. 15, 1823    KENTON DEVON ENGLAND   
Marriage    Aug. 28, 1848    EXETER ENGLAND   
Death    Dec. 19, 1910    FREDERICKTON KEMPSEY   
Burial        FREDERICKTON   
Other Wives       
Parents    WILLIAM SANDERS and ELIZABETH GREEN

Wife    MARY ANN SKIVINGS   

Birth    About 1830    SILVERTON DEVON ENGLAND   
Death    Nov. 13, 1882    FREDRICKTON KEMPSEY NSW AUSTRALIA   
Burial        FREDERICKTON CEMETERY   
Other Husbands       
Parents    GEORGE S SKIVINGS and GRACE 

Children  

1    ELIZABETH GRACE SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Oct. 28, 1850    HORSLEY NSW   
Husband    EDRED EVERSON   
Marriage    Aug. 3, 1868    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Jan. 30, 1904    KINCHELA NSW   
Burial    

2    HARRIET FRANCES SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jun. 4, 1852    YARRABANDINI NSW   
Husband    THOMAS ROWE   
Marriage    Dec. 6, 1869    KINCHELA NSW   
Death    Oct. 13, 1942    DUNGOG   
Burial        

3    WILLIAM GEORGE SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Feb. 11, 1854    YARRABANDINI NSW   
Wife    ELIZABETH HURELL   
Marriage    Jul. 30, 1879    KINCHELA NSW   
Death    Aug. 10, 1923    SOUTH WEST ROCKS NSW AUSTRALIA   
Burial    

4    FREDERICK JOHN SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Oct. 18, 1855    MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Wife    LUCY JANE HURRELL   
Marriage    Apr. 11, 1878    KINCHELA   
Death    Jan. 23, 1921    MARRICKVILLE SYDNEY AUSTRALIA   
Burial   

5    CHARLES HENRY SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jan. 1, 1860    AUSTRAL EDEN   
Wife    MARY ANN PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Aug. 17, 1881    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Jul. 16, 1926    MACKSVILLE   
Burial    

6    ALFRED SIVERT SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jan. 4, 1861    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Wife    EMILY JANE MINCHEN   
Marriage    Apr. 29, 1886    SMITHTOWN   
Death    1933    KEMPSEY   
Burial  

7    ERNEST ALBERT SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Dec. 21, 1862    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Wife    ANNIE JANE PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Jun. 9, 1886    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Nov. 20, 1911    UPPER UNKYA   
Burial    

8   MARY ANN SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Nov. 17, 1864    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Husband    JOSEPH ISAAC HARRIS   
Marriage    Jun. 7, 1885    AUSTRAL EDEN   
Death    Dec. 4, 1941    BRISBANE   
Burial  

9    WALTER THOMAS SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Mar. 18, 1867    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife    ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Jul. 10, 1895    KEMPSEY   
Death    Jan. 24, 1922    KEMPSEY   
Burial    

10    AGNES JANE SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jul. 9, 1869    KINCHELA CREEK MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Husband    CHARLES HENRY WILLIAM  TAYLOR   
Marriage    Nov. 25, 1891    ST LEONARDS   
Death    Aug. 6, 1951    QUEENSLAND   
Burial        LUTWYCHE CEMETERY BRISBANE  

11    EDRED JAMES SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Oct. 2, 1870    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife    ANNIE EDITH NELSON   
Marriage    Dec. 25, 1912    WEST KEMPSEY NSW AUSTRALIA   
Death    Mar. 26, 1938    KEMPSEY   
Burial    

12   SARAH ELLEN SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jan. 27, 1872    KINCHELA CREEK   
Husband    ROBERT EVAN KITCHING   
Marriage    Oct. 26, 1895    SYDNEY AUSTRALIA   
Death    Feb. 9, 1946    CAMPBELLTOWN   
Burial 

13    CHRISTOPHER GEORGE SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jul. 3, 1873    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife       
Marriage           
Death    Jan. 3, 1882    KINCHELA CREEK   
Burial       

 

   

 

      

 

      

         

   

 

THE HURRELLS

COURTESY OF BARB MILLER.

BARB HAS GENEROUSLY PROVIDED ME WITH THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

Lucy Jane Hurrell married Frederick Sanders. Lucy was descended from JOHN HURRELL and his second wife. JOHN HURRELL was born in 1828 in CAWSTON NORFOLK, to MARK and ELIZABETH HURRELL according to his immigration record. He also had cousins called JOHN HURRELL. Our JOHN died on 14 January 1908 on the MACLEAY RIVER NSW. 

John’s father was MARK HURRELL. Mark married twice. Elizabeth was his first wife.  Mary Warner was his second. He was an Agricultural  labourer living in Eastgate, Cawston in 1851 census. aged 53, widower with his son Thomas and Mark’s brother John aged 60 (pensioner- from services – Chelsea Hospital ) widower and John’s children Susanna and Ann M. I don’t know how many other children Mark had with either of his wives.

John married firstly to HARRIET TENPENNY ABBOTT in Holbeach Lincolnshire England in Mar 14 1849 ( Folio XIV page 561) then living at SUTTON CROSSES, SUTTON ST MARY LINCOLNSHIRE in 1851. Occupation Farm Labourer. Came to Australia on the BEEJAPORE in 1853 with Harriet. Dreadful conditions on this ship with many deaths and illnesses. Harriet died in 1853. John could read and write and paid two pound for his  and his wife’s passage to Australia.  On immigration records at State records NSW he was living in LONG SUTTON, Lincolnshire prior to emigration and knew noone in the colony. Mother Elizabeth deceased prior to his departure for Australia. No children of marriage to Harriet.

John remarried : ELLEN CROWE 26/11/1854 in Parish of St Lawrence in the County of Cumberland NSW. (C of E ) 677/41B. Witnesses: FREDERICK LOUIS WILLIAM HERRMANN of Castlereagh St Sydney, and JANE HERRMANN of Castlereagh St Sydney. Age 37. Occupation Farmer at time of Thomas’ birth in 1865. Buried FREDERICKTON CEMETERY McLeay River NSW Row M C of E Section.  ELLEN CROWE was the daughter of MICHAEL CROWE and was born in DUBLIN IRELAND in c 1831. She died at at McLeay River on 12/2/1899.

JOHN AND ELLEN HURRELL HAS THE FOLLOWING CHILDREN:

 

    BORN MARRIED DIED
1 JOHN 1855 SYDNEY   1875 MACLEAY RIVER
2 ELIZA MARY 12/2/1858 SYDNEY 3/8/1939 WILLIAM SANDERS  
3 LUCY JANE 1861 MACLEAY RIVER NSW FREDERICK SANDERS  
4 MARK 1862 MACLEAY RIVER RUTH HENRY 27/7/1910 MCLEAY RIVER
5 MARY 1863 WILLIAM PRICE  
6 THOMAS DENNIS 10 MAY 1865 KINCHELA CK ISABELLA SMAILES  
7 ELLEN MATILDA 1867 MCLEAY RIVER   1943 ASHFIELD NSW
8 JAMES 1869 MCLEAY RIVER   1946 LIVERPOOL
9 ANN 1872    
10 GEORGE 1873 MCLEAY RIVER   1875 MCLEAY RIVER

 

BARB MILLER TELLS ME THAT THE INFORMATION BELOW WAS GIVEN TO HER FROM YVONNE SZWEDYE’S WEBSITE “FOR THOSE WHO CAME BEFORE” ON ROOTSWEB. I WOULD PROVIDE A LINK BUT HAVEN’T BEEN ABLE TO LOCATE THE PAGE.  ( LET ME KNOW IF I CAN FIX THIS ONE UP )

THIS GENERATION BELOW IS MY OWN GRANDFATHER JOHN GEORGE’S .

 

THESE ARE THE CHILDREN OF LUCY JANE AND FREDERICK SANDERS.

    BORN MARRIED DIED
1 FREDERICK WILLIAM 13/2/1879 EUPHEMIA NELSON 27/7/1950
2 JOHN GEORGE 10/4/1881 ELIZABETH CRAIG 10/11/1950
3 MAUD EVELYN 13/6/1883   14/6/1954
4 CLARENCE MACLEAY 13/7/1885 BEATRICE DANGERFIELD 15/5/1960
5 META MAY 24/10/1887   29/8/1888
6 CLEMENT CONSTANT 15/9/1889 ELLEN WOODWARD 31/1/1961
7 JANIE 27/10/1894   4/8/1903
8 HERBERT BURDETT 6/11/1896   23/7/1916

 

 

 

 

 

IN THIS YEAR : 1797 : JOHN CURTIS COMES ON THE GANGES

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article656255

The Hobart Town Gazette… Saturday 1 May 1819, page 2.

Account of prosecutions for forging Bank of England Notes, taken from the returns of the Bank Solicitor :-From 1783 to 1796 inclusive, there were 3 capital convictions and 1 acquittal, being only 4 prosecutions in 14 years- From 1797 to the 25th February 1818, there were 313 persons capitally convicted, 521 for having forged notes in their possession, and 164 acquittals, being 998 prosecutions in the space of 21 years ; of which 288 happened since the beginning of 1816,

20 16 jack jessie joyce & jean 1927

JACK, JOYCE AND JEAN WITH JESSIE SARAH NEE (READY) BELL

1927 : DESCENDANTS OF JOHN CURTIS.

 

 

 

See General Orders of March 10, 1797, and January 14,1804), with details of the rights of convict servants inc rates of pay,rations, hours etc.

 

 

                  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1089944

 

 

 

IMMIGRATION REPORT 1852

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article671085

 

IMMIGRATION REPORT FOR 1852 INCLUDING STATISTICS FOR THE WHOLE PERIOD OF EMIGRATION.

VERY DETAILED PROFILE OF IMMIGRATION IN AUSTRALIA.

 

(The following year 1853 sees the arrival of the CRAIGS, HURRELLS and JACKSONS. )

 

wilhelmina mcleod 

WILHELMINA MCLEOD

20 12 some indians

WHERE HAVE WE COME FROM ?

IMMIGRATION IN THE NLA NEWSPAPERS

Known Immigrants in the family at this time are :

YEAR SHIP PERSON/S FROM TO
1839 JAMES MORGAN JANET MACKAY AND CHILDREN INC WILHELMINA MCLEOD SUTHERLAND SHIRE SCOTLAND SYDNEY
1849 VICTORIA WILLIAM  SANDERS AND MARY ANN SKIVINGS (MARRIED COUPLE) DEVON ENGLAND SYDNEY
1853 WILLIAM BROWN JACKSONS   SYDNEY
1853 BEEJAPORE THOMAS CRAIG , PARENTS AND SIBLINGS   SYDNEY
1853 BEEJAPORE HURRELLS   SYDNEY

ARTICLES ON EMIGRATION/IMMIGRATION IN NLA NEWSPAPERS:

 
 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640683

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640671

 
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640576

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE TAKEN BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION. MAY l8, 1835

The Superintendent having left the ship before her arrival in Port Jackson, there was latterly no control whatever over the women, and some of them who had been
allowed to land, immediately after the ship came to anchor, were picked up quite drunk in the streets of Sydney, on the evening of their arrival.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639961

The Perth Gazette and… Saturday 10 June 1837, page 918

SYDNEY. IMMIGRATION COMMITTEE. (From the Sydney “Colonist . “

This committee report came out the year before Mary Ann and William Sanders  came on the VICTORIA.

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639961

 

  • The Government, however, have latterly proposed a measure for the encouragement and promotion of emigration which, if the settlers were at all alive to their own interests and disposed to cooperate in securing them, would be tantamount to the adoption of our original recommendation. For, at a cost for agency which would be altogether insignificant for each individual or family brought out to the colony, the respectable colonists might have seemed through the Government measure we allude to, the immediate introduction of two or three thousand families of virtuous and industrious emigrants of the classes chiefly required in the colony.

 

 
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639883

LAND AND IMMIGRATION COMPANY.

An experiment has been tried in New South Wales to increase the number of immigrants by the formation of a Land and Immigration Company. The shares to be raised were 5,000, one half to be disposed of in the colony, and the other half to be reserved for capitalists in England. As we are also in need of an augmentation of our numbers, the hint may not be unprofitably applied ;

 

Archives Investigator  
State Records Authority of New South Wales

 IMMIGRATION – The Bounty System


 

Extracted from the:- “Concise Guide to State Archives of New South Wales

Shipping & Passenger Records
Ballarat & District Genealogical Society Inc

 

 

LIST OF SHIPPING SITES AND EMIGRATIONS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639883

The McLeods and Mackays perhaps from the Sutherland Shire !

3rd. In Scotland, and the north of Ireland, where no such contribution could be looked for, but where the lower classes, being more intelligent, industrious and frugal, would be better fitted for roughing it in a new colony, virtuous and industrious families of these classes would willingly bind themselves to pay that amount from the first of their savings after their arrival ; and if in the event of their purchasing land on credit from the Company, this debt were to be chargeable on the land, its repayment would be secured.

 

http://www.angelfire.com/ns/bkeddy/HIES/1.html
_________________________________________________
Highland and Island Emigration Society, HIES
_____________________________________
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article642443

In fact, the obstructions, the suspense, and the jobbing of the present system, tend to destroy, the property, if not work the absolute ruin €of the poorer class of immigrants. An individual of this description on his arrival is forced to leave his family in Sydney, whilst he proceeds to explore the north, the south, or the westward, for a suitable location

 

JOHN CURTIS

 

JOHN CURTIS CAME AS CONVICT ON THE GANGES IN 1797. RANDOM EXTRACTS FROM NLA NEWSPAPERS MENTIONING THE NAME JOHN CURTIS. ONCE AGAIN . COULD BE OUR JOHN. MIGHT NOT BE. NEVERTHELESS THE ENTRIES ARE WORTH READING ON THE NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIA WEBSITE.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627695

SYDNEY GAZETTE 1809

Lost or Mislaid, a Note of Hand drawn by John Curtis in favor of Thomas Jones for £40. This is to caution the Public against receiving in payment the said Note, it being my property.

Hugh Devlin

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627801

More about the same note. Could well be Grandfather John since he lived at Parramatta at this time.

BELLINGER NOTES FROM THE NLA NEWSPAPERS

MAY HOLS 08 017

BELLINGEN BRIDGE 2008

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article692605

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE : COASTERS IN 1847.

___________________________________________

BELLINGER CEDAR IN 1847

NORTHERN CEDAR.-On Monday last we noticed the arrival of some extraordinarily large logs of cedar, by the new schooner built at the Bellinger River for Mr. John Robertson, Market Wharf: Since then we have learnt that one-half the cargo (30,000  feet cedar) is the produce of only one tree, the parent of the immense logs first noticed. This interesting specimen of Bellinger produce yielded about 15,000 feet sawn timber, and realised in Sydney upwards of one hundred guineas. The purchase, we believe, has been made for the China market; and as the quality of this cedar is correspondent with its magnitude, it will tend, we trust, to increase the growing repute of Australian cedar with the Celestials.-S. M. Herald, August 19. 1847

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article692605

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article693044

THE SCHOONER . VIXEN. -We are happy to state that this vessel, which has for some

time past been given up by most persons as lost, arrived in the harbour in safely on

Tuesday evening. Captain Stevens informs us, that after leaving this port for Newcastle

on the 17th July, he experienced nothing but heavy gales from the westward, and was

driven to a distance of about four hundred miles off the land, which he did not make

again until the 7th ultimo, when be spoke the ketch Brothers, of Sydney, (being then

off the Bellinger River) in a very distressed state, but could render her no assistance, as

the gale had not abated. Captain Stevens then bore up for the Richmond River, and 

from thence has brought on a full cargo of cedar.

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article693881

The new schooner built at the Bellinger River for Mr. John Robertson, and which arrived in Sydney a few weeks since,

has been purchased by Captain Hovenden, of the schooner Harlequin, for the sum of  £905. –

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 1 July 1848, page 2. News 2766 words

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article710635

 

A new three-masted schooner called the Helen arrived in Harbour on Wednesday

last, from the Bellinger River, having been built there by Mr. M’Donald, for Messrs.

Inder and Tebbutt, of Sydney. She is about 90 tons builder’s measurement, and her di-

mensions nr:- 73 feet over keel, 17 feet beam and 7 feet depth of hold. She has on board

45,000 feet cedar

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 26 July 1848, page 3.

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711021

 

The Phoenix, from the Clarence River,

was compelled to seek shelter at the Seal

Rocks on Saturday last, from the southerly

gale, and remained there twenty-four hours.

The schooner Secret, from Moreton Bay, and

the Jane Scott, from the Bellinger River,

were lying there wind-bound on Sunday

morning

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article680322

MURDERS BY THE BLACKS.- Intelligence was received yesterday, in Sydney, from the Bellinger River, dated the 17th inst. stating
that Daniel Devlin, His wife, and Dennis Cheyne, all living on John Robertson’s cedar cutting station, had been inhumanly murdered by the blacks. The same letter also states that a civilized black, who had been living for a considerable time with Commissioner Massie, had been decoyed away and murdered by the Maitland tribe on the M’Leay River. The white population of these districts are said to be out in pursuit of tbe savages. The particulars may be expected in Sydney in a few days. Mrs. Devlin has left a child nine months old. Her parents
reside at the Five Islands.-Herald, Mar. 30. 1846

___________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article702844

 

The Star of China has made a fair passage of fourteen days from Auckland, notwithstanding she had experienced exceedingly
had weather along the coast. She was off the Bellinger River on the 23rd instant, having been driven out of her course by south-west
winds and strong northerly currents. On Friday last, she was compelled to seek shelter in Seal Rock Bay, where she remained about
thirty hours ; and on Sunday put into Port Stephens, from whence she sailed on Tuesday morning.

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 2 June 1849, page 3.

_________________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article700673

The master of the schooner Fama, David
Dennis, was drowned at the Bellinger River,

on the 22nd July, by the capsizing of a boat

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 1 September 1849, page 3.

_________________________________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article695589

THE STEAMER ” PHOENIX.”-A rumour has been in circulation, since the arrival from the

Richmond River of the ketch Pelican, that the Phoenix was on the bar at the Clarence. The

news was communicated by some blacks to one of the passengers by the Pelican, but in the

absence of more authentic information we would hope that the rumour is without foundation.

People’s Advocate, March 16.-Rumours were rife in town last night that the Phoenix steamer,

now 14 days overdue on her return trip from the Clarence to Sydney, had been wrecked on her

passage thither. We give the rumour as it reached us, and believe it to have originated in

a report of the blacks, of their having discovered some bags of flour and other articles of a description likely to have been an up-country cargo, on

the line of coast, floated ashore between the Bellinger and Richmond Rivers-Bell’s Life,

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 20 March 1850, page 2.

_________________________________________________

READ ON AT THE LINKS ABOVE FOR MORE BELLINGER TALES. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA. BRAVO !

_________________________________________________

 

more tales of BELLINGEN and the 19th Century in the Colony on :

http://melindakendall.wordpress.com/

KALANG 2008 020 KALANG 2008 021
THE BRIDGE AT GLENIFFER (NAMED BY A CRAIG ANCESTOR) NEVER NEVER CREEK GLENIFFER VALLEY

 

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne%27s-heritage-web-site

____________________________________________

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm 

Mary-Anne Warner’s site transcribing STATE RECORDS of SHIPS. easy to navigate. Detailed.

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS

JOHANNAH READY

Johannah was my great-great-great-great grandmother on my mother’s side as they say. That is – she was my GGGGGrandmother if in fact it was her son who fathered Peter Mark. It could have been one THOMAS HOGAN. For the time being we will stay with the legal records and claim Johannah as kinfolk.

This is her story as Phil Ready recorded it for READY OR NOT.

JOHANNAH READY 1765-183?

” The ARCHDUKE CHARLES , a one class two decked vessel of five hundred and twenty five tons burthen was built in Newcastle England in 1809.  With J.P.  JEFFRIES as master and JOHN PAWSON as surgeon the ship sailed from Cork, Ireland on Friday 15th May 1812 with 147 male and 54 female convicts for the Penal Colony of NSW. Travelling via Rio de Janeiro she arrived at Sydney two hundred and seven days later on 16th February 1813. ( The Convict Ships by Charles Bateson)

Among the prisoners was 47 years old Johannah Ready sentenced by the court during 1811 in County Tipperary, Ireland to fourteen years transportation to the Colony.

On disembarking at Sydney Cove, Johannah was taken to the women’s barracks and then allocated to work at Government House Windsor. This necessitated a journey that was long and dangerous at that time for there were many thieves and bushrangers about so the party travelled with an armed guard. Johannah is listed in the Windsor Ration Book as receiving rations during 1813 and 1815 ( loc A 803 pp 59,90,122 ML) and during this time became Housekeeper at Government House.

Records show that she received payments for this position during 1814 and 1815 from the Police Fund. (Wentworth Papers loc. D1 M4 pp 121 137 ML)  Her salary was published in the following editions of the SYDNEY GAZETTE.

5 AUGUST 1815 12 MONTHS WINDSOR 20 pds
11 MAY 1816 6  MONTHS PARRAMATTA 10 pds
8 FEB 1817 12 MONTHS WINDSOR 20 pds

 

As housekeeper at Government House Johannah would have come in contact with some of the most influential people in the Colony including the Rev Samuel Marsden and William Cox , Magistrate.

Johannah’s son John Ready, arrived as a prisoner aboard the convict ship THE THREE BEES in June of 1814 and by the end of the year had become overseer of the Government Dairy at Windsor.

In July of 1814 there was great excitement in the Colony for Governor Macquarie had accepted the generous offer of William Cox to build a road over the mountains along with the route discovered by Blaxland,  Lawson and  Wentworth. So well did the team work that by 21 Jan 1815 the road had been completed and by May the Governor with his wife and a well equipped party was able to travel along the new road from Parramatta. Crossing the mountains Macquarie was able , with the help of Cox to lay out the proposed town of Bathurst on the banks of the Macquarie River which had been discovered by George Evans the previous year.

Two years later John and Johannah both still  at Windsor, testified at an inquest held on Wednesday 16th December 1817 into the accidental drowning of a dairy stockman. In their testimony they stated that the stockmen John Holland  and Edward Knight were good friends at the time of the accident.

Holland and Knight had gone to a nearby creek to bathe at a spot that John Holland considered safe but unfortunately neither could swim and when Holland got out of his depth Knight was unable to help him. He ran to a nearby Mill but being unsuccessful there went on to Government House where he asked the Gardener for help. As only one of those who came to help could swim ( very few people at that time could) it was two hours before John Holland’s body was recovered.

The Coroner being absent the Rev Samuel Marsden swore in the Chief Constable Francis Oates to act in his stead and Johannah unable to write put her mark on her testimony whilst her son John signed his name ( INQUESTS AONSW)

On 31 August 1819 both Johannah and John Ready received their pardons from the Governor and just over 6 months later on 7 Feb 1820 John married Elizabeth Curtis, daughter of John Curtis and Ann Moran . Elizabeth born in 1803 was now 17 years of age and John 30.

Although of the Catholic faith the wedding took place in St Johns Church of England Parramatta for at that time Catholicism was discouraged with no Catholic Priest being allowed to officiate.

In 1822 Johannah applied to the new Governor Sir Thomas Brisbane, to have her sone Phillip and his family brought out as assisted immigrants from Ireland stating that Phillip was known to Mr Walsh the gaoler at City Cork where both she and John had been held for some time before embarkation but there is no record of the family ever having migrated to the Colony ( Governors Despatches 1822 loc 1193 p 230 ML)

Finally restrictions on the Roman Catholic Faith were relaxed with a move made to build a RC Chapel at Parramatta. Johannah is listed in the SYDNEY GAZETTE EDITIONS

17 MAY 1822
11 OCTOBER 1822
13 MARCH 1823
17 MARCH 1824

as making a subscription towards this aim. However as the Chapel had not been built by the 9th June 1824 Johannah was obliged to use St John’s Church, this time for her own wedding , for at the age of 59 she married 46 year old FRANCIS PRENDERGAST.

JOHANNAH READY AND THE ARCHDUKE CHARLES

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628633

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 20 February 1813, page 2.

The Archduke Charles, Captain JEFFRIES, left Portsmouth for Cork the 28th of March last, and arrived at the latter on the 28th, where she lay till the 16th of May  following, when she sailed for this Colony with 147 male

and 54 female prisoners. Of the men two died on the passage; namely, Arthur Culmady, aged 67, from the infirmities of age ; and John Lenna, a young man, from extreme debility. All the others arrived in apparent good health.

The delay of this ship’s arrival was occasioned by the loss of her rudder, shortly after her departure from Rio de Janeiro, which she left with the Minstrel and Indefatigable in company, the 11th of August. The 25th of September she arrived at the Cape of Good Hope to repair the accident ; and was detained there till the 19th of December, upon which day she resumed her voyage for this Port.

A few days before her departure a vessel arrived from England, from whence she had sailed the 1st of Oct. 1812,  and by which the pleasant accounts transmitted hither were received at the Cape. The account accompanying the report of the Archduke Charles’s arrival in last week’s Gazette was .consequently erroneous, in stating that the vessel which conveyed those consequential dispatches arrived at the Cape the 1st of October, instead of stating that to be the day on which she sailed from England.

By the Archduke Charles have arrived Lieutenants BURBRIDGE and CONNOR, of the 1st Battalion. 73d Regiment, with a detachment of thirty non-commissioned officers and privates, to join the Battalion.

 archduke charles sydney gazette 12 feb 1813

SYDNEY GAZETTE 1812 OCTOBER 24

article628559-3-001ARCHDUKE CHARLESThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 24 October 1812, page 3

article628633-3-001ACThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 20 February 1813, page 

JOHANNAH READY 1765-183?

JOHANNAH READY CONVICT ON ARCHDUKE CHARLES 1813

ALSO ABOARD THE ARCHDUKE CHARLES IN 1813 : THANKS TO SAG
Patrick Kohelly per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
John Phelan per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Thomas Phelan per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Daniel Meskill per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Frances Sharkey per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Thomas Kenna per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Thomas Givnon per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Susannah Wiley per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
James Morris per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Timothy Bell per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Patrick Dawley per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Patrick Cooney per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Catherine Keynon per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
William O Brien per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
James Fitzpatrick per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Givnon per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Patrick Hopkins per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Cornelius Galvin per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Walter Hall per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Matthew Gill per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
James Duk Steenson per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Thomas (Snr) Gwnson per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Timothy Bell per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Ellenor Holland per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Luke Grant per ship Archduke Charles, 1813
Margaret Leary per ship Archduke Charles, 1813

GANGES 1797

JOHN CURTIS CAME ON THE GANGES 1797. ALSO ON BOARD :

Ticket of Leave details for John Flynn

Last name
Flynn

First name
John

Ship
Ganges

Year
nd

Native place
NR

Trade or calling
NR

District
Sydney QS

Ticket no
53/74

State Records shelf ref
4/4228

State Records reel no
891

Ticket of Leave details for James Gregg

Last name
Gregg

First name
James

Ship
Ganges

Year
1797

District
Cumberland lif

Ticket no
Dec-30

State Records shelf ref
4/4427

State Records reel no
601

Ticket of Leave details for Hannah Hutchings

Ticket of Leave details for Hannah Hutchings

Last name
Hutchings

First name
Hannah

Ship
Brothers

Year
1824

Native place
Islington

Trade or calling
Servant

District
MGD

Ticket no
29/1007

State Records shelf ref
4/4073

State Records reel no
913

Last name
Hutchings

First name
Hannah

Ship
Brothers

Year
1824

Native place
Islington

Trade or calling
Servant

District
MAG

Ticket no
31/921

State Records shelf ref
4/4081

State Records reel no
916

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/07/24/hannah-hutchings-sentence-of-death/

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/05/23/hannahs-family/

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/more-about-hannah/

LYNNE BELL SANDERS