Category Archives: READY

FREE SEARCH VICTORIAN BDMS. PETER MARK READY KNWN AS HOGAN.

PETER MARK READY HOGAN DEATH

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SHOTS OF SUSSEX STREET WHERE THE READYS HAD A SHOP – COURTESY JON SANDERS

SUSSEX STREET

 

This builtding is at the other end of the block on the corner w King Street

I have been doing a bit of research on city buildings and I remembered that I have a note somewhere (from info you sent me) that Peter Ready had a shop at 165 Sussex Street.
I went down this morning not expecting much and unsurprisingly 165 is no longer there. However the block it was in is largely still 19th C because the Sheraton 4 Points Hotel occupies the whole site and apart from what I calculate to be about 161-169 (which have been demolished for the main entrance ) the rest of the Western side of the street is intact and incorporated into thehotel.

2.02.14 171 Sussex Street

 

This pre 1860s pub is at 171 and is directly to the left of the Entrance Drive way.
The yellow building to the left of it is the Corn Exchange (originally a fruit market and the oldest existing market building in the city) from 1887.

SUSSEX STREET

John Ready’s mother, Johanna Pendergast

Another snippet – John Ready’s mother, Johanna Pendergast died 3 December 1838 and was buried at St Matthew’s RC Church, Windsor (Burial No 112, page 225, Windsor burial register 1835-1874, described as a settler, officiating priest W Brady).

Betty

GOVERNMENT HOUSE WINDSOR

WINDSOR 012 WINDSOR 010

These are two of the buildings near the Terrace Motel in Windsor. OLD GOVERNMENT HOUSE is long gone but we are coming across images and newspaper reports about it.

EXTRACT FROM PHIL READY’S ‘READY OR NOT’.

JOHANNAH READY 1765-183?

” The ARCHDUKE CHARLES , a one class two decked vessel of five hundred and twenty five tons burthen was built in Newcastle England in 1809.  With J.P.  JEFFRIES as master and JOHN PAWSON as surgeon the ship sailed from Cork, Ireland on Friday 15th May 1812 with 147 male and 54 female convicts for the Penal Colony of NSW. Travelling via Rio de Janeiro she arrived at Sydney two hundred and seven days later on 16th February 1813. ( The Convict Ships by Charles Bateson)

Among the prisoners was 47 years old Johannah Ready sentenced by the court during 1811 in County Tipperary, Ireland to fourteen years transportation to the Colony.

On disembarking at Sydney Cove, Johannah was taken to the women’s barracks and then allocated to work at Government House Windsor. This necessitated a journey that was long and dangerous at that time for there were many thieves and bushrangers about so the party travelled with an armed guard. Johannah is listed in the Windsor Ration Book as receiving rations during 1813 and 1815 ( loc A 803 pp 59,90,122 ML) and during this time became Housekeeper at Government House.

Records show that she received payments for this position during 1814 and 1815 from the Police Fund. (Wentworth Papers loc. D1 M4 pp 121 137 ML)  Her salary was published in the following editions of the SYDNEY GAZETTE.

5 AUGUST 1815 12 MONTHS WINDSOR 20 pds

11 MAY 1816 6  MONTHS PARRAMATTA 10 pds

8 FEB 1817 12 MONTHS WINDSOR 20 pds

As housekeeper at Government House Johannah would have come in contact with some of the most influential people in the Colony including the Rev Samuel Marsden and William Cox , Magistrate.

Johannah’s son John Ready, arrived as a prisoner aboard the convict ship THE THREE BEES in June of 1814 and by the end of the year had become overseer of the Government Dairy at Windsor.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15863030

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.

The Sydney Morning Herald… Tuesday 7 October 1919,

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD. |

Sir, – I note that. in your to-day’s issue you have an interesting article on some of the historic churches In New South Wales. You also make reference to the old Government House at Windsor, still standing. I have a photo, of this old building, and when I was in Windsor a year or two ago I was surprised to see that this historic building was then being used partly as a stable and partly as a laundry. We are inclined to decry conservatism as not worthy of this comparatively young country, but I think and believe that many will agree with me that a little conservatism in this particular case would be a good thing. The building, together with the land it occupies, could probably be bought for a nominal figure, and at a very slight expense could be secured against further decay, and kept as a relic of the early days of this State

(or colony as it then was)

I am, etc,

HISTORICUS.

Newcastle, Oct. 3.   

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18981643

DOCUMENT REFERRED TO. 1820.

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 22 March 1890,

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15427482

A BOOK FOR ARCHITECTS.

The Sydney Morning Herald… Saturday 14 June 1913,

Mr. Baker says that In the old Government House at Windsor, which was built about 1796, the floors, skirtings,

doors, windows, and oven weatherboards,which were made of rod cedar, are all in good preservation to-day.

cabinet timbers ogh

FROM NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIA.

nla.pic-an2384440-voghnla.pic-an2384440

nla.pic-an2384440

Cazneaux, Harold, 1878-1953.

Second Government House … [picture]

[191-?] 1 photograph ; 17.1 x 25.2 cm.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15989304

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954), Tuesday 14 February 1922, page 11

museums and memorialsThe Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday 14 February 1922, page 11

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16787808

HISTORIC WINDSOR. SMUGGLERS’ CAVE AND OLD HOUSES.

The Sydney Morning Herald… Monday 22 June 1931

At the courthouse-the oldest building of Its kind in the Commonwealth-the party was shown the fine painting of Governor Macquarie, the funds to pay for which were subscribed by the residents of the town.In the building are some quaint old leather covered chairs which were originally in old Government House at Windsor.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16932778

"BACK TO WINDSOR" WEEK. WINDSOR, Wednesday.

The Sydney Morning Herald… Thursday 24 November 1932

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17311820

OLD SYDNEY. Combined Etching Exhibition

The Sydney Morning Herald… Tuesday 8 December 1936,

WINDSOR 013 WINDSOR 029

NEWSPAPER SNIPPETS. NLA NEWSPAPERS.

My grandmother, JESSIE SARAH READY ( BELL) and her family  were resident in LITTLE YOUNG STREET REDFERN. i shall confirm the dates later but we were told the house was under where the Greek Orthodox Church now stands. The time in Redfern was late 1800s to early 1900s. I have found a few snippets as background for the times.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13716158 Sewage comes to Redfern. 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954)  Saturday 2 March 1889

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13715023 SOME REDFERN FUNERALS. 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Thursday 21 February 1889

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14621972 Lily and Sidney Sullivan , aged 7 and 9 years swallowed some liniment by mistake.
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13710482

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Wednesday 16 January 1889. More poisonous liniment.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11005632

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954) Monday 7 January 1935

FIERCE STREET BRAWL

MAN EXPECTED TO DIE

 

http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/AboutSydney/HistoryAndArchives/Default.asp

UPDATE TO READY OR NOT

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/ready-or-not/

I am placing the READY OR NOT research on a page of its own. (see above). Updated today is the story of JOHANNAH READY and FRANCIS PENDERGRAST. 

COLONIAL MOTHERS

THE SAG Newsletter reports that Dr Tanya Evans, now of Macquarie University, is engaged in researching the history of motherhood in early Colonial Australia and Britain between 1750 and 1850. The focus has caught my fancy. My Mind seems to have taken a disproportionate amount of time in recovering from the Change of year and the Summer Season and I haven’t been able to get my mental historical  hard drive functioning at all but this little article has begun to bring the ghosts back to life again. Dr Evans is asking for assistance from any who have worked extensively on their family histories and have details of mothers from these early times. Dept of Modern History at Macquarie University, Sydney would have the contact details for you.

As for me, it has me thinking of all the Mothers of Mine who and the folkore I have been given. The Scottish Widow who was asked to be Laird of the Clan but came out here with her children instead.  Johannah Ready Prendergast, whose son John was sent as a convict to Government House at Windsor where his mother was Housekeeper. I wonder often about Johannah who was 47 when convicted in Ireland. She tried to have another son and his family sent out but failed. When John’s marriage failed and he became excessively odd in his behaviour and was sentenced to Moreton Bay, Johannah disappears from the records. I like to think she followed him.

Ann Moran and Hannah Hutchings/Hitchens. What was it like for them to be mothers here in the early 19th Century ? Young convict women. Ann had 5 children to John Curtis who was already husband and father to a family in England and had attempted to have them brought to him.  Hannah was recorded as a ‘ loose woman’ on the convict ship THE BROTHERS. How did her life as a mother develop from that starting point and from the death of her first husband in the Lunatic Asylum, Liverpool ?

READY OR NOT – FOREWORD

  0 5 julia & george ready 1880s

‘GEORGE’ PETER READY

M 15/11/1882

JULIA JACKSON

0 4 george ready snr 1880s

  CHILDREN OF GEORGE AND JULIA READY DATE BIRTH DATE DEATH
1 UNNAMED 7/11/1883 7/11/1883
2 MABEL 25/9/1884 ????????
3 GEORGE PETER MARK 18/10/1885 25/10/1955
4 FRANK 8/5/87 9/12/87
5 SYDNEY 11/5/1888 4/5/1964
6 ETHEL ELIZABETH MAY 20/9/89 12/2/1890
7 WILLIAM HENRY 1/11/1890 18/2/1964
8 JESSIE SARAH 30/5/1892 18/12/1971
9 FREDERICK BENSON 7/9/1894 10/8/1895
10 ESMA JACKSON 12/7/1896 29/8/1898
11 ARTHUR CHARLES 10/7/1899 29/3/1953
12 ALFRED JAMES 29/4/1901 10/8/1954
  20 9 flora & syd ready 0 8 esma & jessie ready c1898 10 9 arthur front L alf back R
  FLORA AND SYD READY – PARENTS OF PHIL ESMA AND JESSIE READY APP 1898 REDFERN ARTHUR FR L ALF BACK R
   10 11 alf arthur mick & ..scan0013 10 3 jessie ready 1915  10 10 bill & em ready
  ALF READY , ARTHUR READY , MICK BELL AND MORE AT LAURIETON JESSIE SARAH READY BILL AND EM READY

 

THIS IS THE FOREWORD PHIL READY WROTE FOR HIS BOOK – “READY OR NOT “. I AM REPRODUCING IT FOLLOWING HIS EMAIL RE MY PUBLISHING HIS FINDINGS. PERMISSION GRANTED.

When I decided in 1981 to research the history of my family, i believed that we were on my father’s side, descended from an average English, Protestant  family with nothing very exciting to be found.

How wrong I was for I have found that we are descended from Irish Roman Catholic  convicts, that there are numerous skeletons in the family closet and that there existed adventure and romance that I for one never dreamed of and my father, as far as I am aware, never realised.

My mother, would have been shocked, for my earlier memories of her are that she was rather biased against Irish Roman Catholics and judgemental about people’s moral values but as she got older, in line with the changes going on, she mellowed and became more tolerant of other people’s points of view.

The detective work necessary to ferret out the information has taken my wife,Lois, and I to many parts of NSW and VICTORIA whilst the rest of the family have waited to see what would be the next discovery.

The pleasant surprise of receiving phone calls from others researching the READY family has introduced me to Doug Howe and Betty Alford, grandchildren of Catherine Louisa and Sarah Ann, my grandfather’s sisters who married Joseph Howe and William henry Watson respectively. This has opened up more information and has not only led to a continuing friendship with Doug but introduced me to several more cousins on his side of the family. Research by Doug also led to a meeting with Ken Eccleston, great grandson of George Eccleston and his wife Catherine, sister of my great,great grandmother Elizabeth Curtis. Ken’s contributions on the Curtis Family have been invaluable.

Each time I find more information I get a thrill, for there are times when I despair of ever finding the information I want, such as; WHAT HAPPENED TO THOMAS and ELIZABETH HOGAN and to JOHANNAH PRENDERGAST?  I thought that release of the Victorian Records might help but a search of these records has also proven fruitless. Time and further research may find the answer.

Finding my ancestors and researching their history has helped fill in some of my genetic heritage and what has helped in making me the way I am, for each member has added their contribution. I well remember strange feelings I had when I read JOHANNAH’s letter to Governor Darling, and also the story of HANNAH HUTCHINS or HITCHINS ( for there are many variations to the spelling of her name.)

Reading the Surgeon’s account of the voyage of the ‘Dorothy’ gave me some idea of what it was like to travel out on one of the Convict Transports, although the Dorothy apparently had a much better trip than many others.

In some ways I feel that I may have deprived those who come after me of the fun I have had but there is still a lot left untold and each day I guess, we are making history. I hope  that later researchers will enjoy it as much as I have. be careful of what you throw out for, I believe, that although we are not responsible for our ancestors, who incidentally wen through situations that I,for on, would not like to have gone through, we are, as guardians of our heritage, responsible to our descendants.

Phil Ready. July 1988. 

 

SARAH ANN READY ( BENSON) & GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

image 

0 2 sarah & george moore 19th C

SARAH ANN READY (BENSON)

1830-1910

GEORGE MOORE Jnr

1828 -1903

PHIL of READY OR NOT has now sent me an email in response to my request to use his research online. PERMISSION GRANTED said Phil only recently back in Action  after a nasty accident. It was years of work and travel and research that provided the information on the READY line for this generation. PERMISSION GRANTED.  A very gracious response indeed. Phil is currently at work on his Index and updates on READY OR NOT.

from ready or not ; following the death of Peter Mark Ready on the Goldfields of Victoria. Following on from

PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON ON THE GOLDFIELDS

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/07/27/peter-mark-ready-and-sarah-ann-benson-on-the-goldfields/

SARAH ANN (BENSON) READY and GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

Faced with the problem of survival, and with 5 young children to feed, on the 30th October 1863, Peter Mark Ready’s widow, SARAH READY, took the only acceptable course open to her. At the age of 31, 16 months after her husband’s death, she married 35 year old GEORGE MOORE, born in 1828 in SYDNEY to GEORGE MOORE Snr and ANN TRACEY. ( Vol 63 no 897 RGI )

GEORGE MOORE’s relationship to the family before the tragedy is not known but he seems to have been a close friend. Soon after the death of PETER MARK READY, he brought the family back to NSW for it would have been an unhappy reminder to all if they had remained. The fact that George had paid for the funeral and married Sarah the following year, taking on 5 children at the same time says something of his regard for them.

 

GEORGE SENIOR AND ANN TRACEY. George Jnr’s father, GEORGE MOORE Snr, was a 19 year old carpenter who had been living at Newcastle, England , when he was sentenced at his trial on 24 October 1821 to a life sentence and transportation to NSW. Arriving aboard the ASIA II on 24 July 1822, he was assigned to work for SOLOMON LEVY in SYDNEY and in 1826 received permission from the Governor to marry. His marriage to ANN TRACEY who had come free to the Colony, took place on 5 February 1827 and over the next 24 years they had a family of three sons. GEORGE 1828. HENRY 1832  WILLIAM 1842.and a daughter MARY in 1851. George had received a conditional pardon from the Governor in 1837 and lived until 17 April 1883.

 

GEORGE MOORE Jnr and SARAH settled down in SYDNEY and three years later a son WILLIAM THOMAS MOORE was born, the first of their three children. A daughter ESMA was born in 1870 and the last of their children HENRY THOMAS MOORE was born in 1874.

Seeing an opening, GEORGE MOORE Jnr set up as a PRODUCE MERCHANT at 165 Sussex Street Sydney with the family residence at 92 GLEBE STREET, GLEBE. it was here in this area that the children went to school and grew to maturity until on the 4th April 1874, Sarah Ann Ready married WILLIAM HENRY WATSON, a blacksmith from NEW ZEALAND. Four years later, in 1878, her sister ELIZABETH HANNAH READY, married JOHN SMITH and on the 10 June 1879, three months before the establishment of the first steam trams in Sydney, the last of PETER MARK READY’S daughters CATHERINE LOUISA was married to JOSEPH HOWE.

1897 saw the marriage of HENRY MOORE their younger half brother to ELLEN MCPHEE, setting up home across the road from his parents at No 75 GLEBE ROAD GLEBE. Esma Moore appears not to have married.

At the time GEORGE MOORE died , Sarah and he were living in no 94 Glebe Road Glebe, the house next door to their original home. it was here that Sarah died on 17 October 1910. Their graves are in the Church of England Section of Rookwood Cemetery along with the body of one of Sarah’s grandchildren FREDERICK BENSON READY.

There is some evidence that SARAH and PETER MARK READY may have quarrelled on the night so long before when he was killed, for a saying has come down through their daughter Sarah Ann Watson’s branch of the family ;

“ NEVER SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR HUSBAND IN ANGER FOR HE MAY FALL DOWN A MINE.”

SARAH ANN(BENSON) READY m 30/10/1883 GEORGE MOORE JNR
WILLIAM THOMAS
1865-1872
ESMA
1868
HENRY THOMAS
1874-19??
M ELLEN MCPHEE

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

FROM MARILYN;  George Moore married Sarah Ann Ready in Sydney not Victoria, have a marriage transcript and it says Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth St, Sydney, witnesses Henry Samuels (step father) and Jane Samuels!!  Hadn’t noticed before but this must be a half sister, but is she ‘Jane’ or ‘Hannah’.

Their 3rd child, Henry Thomas Moore who married Ellen McPhee, then their 2nd child Leslie Francis Moore who married Gladys May Robinson, then their 1st child Gladys Ivy Moore who married , Allen William Roberts

TRIAL OF GEORGE MOORE SENIOR

GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS, GEORGE MOORE, Theft > pocketpicking, 24th October 1821.

Reference Number: t18211024-151
Offence: Theft ; pocketpicking
Verdict: Guilty; Guilty
Punishment: Transportation

FROM TRIALS OF THE OLD BAILEY ONLINE http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18211024-151-defend1366&div=t18211024-151#highlight

1324. GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS and GEORGE MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of James Larbalesher , from his person .

JAMES LARBALESHER . On Monday last, between twelve and one o’clock at night, I was at the corner of Hatton-garden , coming home with my wife, several people passed near me, I felt and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner Lewis give it to a woman. I took him and the woman. Moore came up and said, "What have you to do with this woman, she has nothing of yours." I called the watch and took Moore too as an accomplice; he endeavoured to escape, but I pursued and took him. I do not know what became of the woman. I am sure I saw it in Lewis’s hand.

BENJAMIN RUSHBROOK . I was parting from a few friends at the corner of Hatton-garden. I heard a bustle, and saw Moore lay hold of the prosecutor, and say "What have you to do with this woman, she has no handkerchief of yours." The prosecutor took him, the woman escaped with the handkerchief.

THOMAS BARTLET . The prisoners were given in my charge.

LEWIS’S Defence. I was out of employ and was distressed, my parents having a large family I did not like to live on them, which caused me to keep late hours. I humbly implore mercy.

MORRIS’S Defence. I got intoxicated and shoved one of these gentlemen, but what else I did I cannot say. I was in the woman’s company.

LEWIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

MORRIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

PERMISSION GRANTED

Today I received an email from PHIL READY, who with his wife Lois, ( descendant of 2nd fleet) compiled READY OR NOT . Hours and hours he tells me in the Mitchell Library and many cemeteries. Phil’s work was one of the major initiating factors for me in this venture. He has given me full permission to use his research . Thank you, indeed, Phil.

READYS IN NSW STATE RECORDS

Colonial Secretary Index, 1788-1825

READY, Mrs. Housekeeper at Government House, Windsor

1815 Aug 5-1816 May 11

Her salary as housekeeper at Government House, Windsor, paid from the Police Fund (Reel 6038; SZ759 pp.123, 200)

 

READY, Johanna. Dairy woman at Government Dairy

1817 Dec 16

Evidence at inquest on John Holland (Reel 6021; 4/1819 p.274)

READY, John. Overseer of the Government Dairy

1817 Dec 16

Evidence at inquest on John Holland (Reel 6021; 4/1819 p.275)

READY, John ?

1821 Jan 24, May 24

Store receipts of for fresh meat and salt pork (Reel 6051; 4/1748 pp.143, 152, 159, 176)

READY, John ?

1822 Jan 5, May 18

Servant to James Bellamy. On returns of proceedings of the Bench of Magistrates, Parramatta (Fiche 3297; X643 pp.1a, 12)

READY, John

1822 May 4

On return of proceedings of the Bench of Magistrates, Parramatta (Fiche 3297; X643 p.11)

READY, John. Of Windsor

1823 Oct 15

Memorial for land at Patricks Plains (Fiche 3071; 4/1835B No.268 pp.637-40)

1823 May 23; 1824 Jan 30

On list of persons receiving an assigned convict (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D pp.45, 57)

READY, John ?

1823 Oct 16

Re passport issued (Reel 6011; 4/3509 pp.430, 431)

READY, John ?

1824 Jul 24

Runaway from Mulgoa. On return of fines and punishments in the Police Office (Reel 6023; 4/6671 p.83)

READY, John. Of district of Field of Mars ?

1825 Jun 11

Memorial (Fiche 3152; 4/1844A No.678 pp.159-62)

1825 Jun 20

To be victualled from the Store at Parramatta for six months; with his wife and convict servant (Reel 6014; 4/3514 p.515)

READY, John. Per “Three Bees”, 1814; of Parramatta

1820 May 18

Memorial (Fiche 3029; 4/1825A No.637 pp.459-62)

1822 Mar 31-Sep 30

On lists of persons to whom convict mechanics have been assigned (Fiche 3296; X53 pp.8, 20, 34)

1823 Apr 5

On return of allotments in the town of Parramatta; listed as Raidy (Fiche 3265; 4/7576 pp.1, 9)

1823 May 30

On list of persons who have neglected to pay for convict mechanics assigned up to 31 Mar 1822 (Reel 6010; 4/3508 p.422)

READY, Martin. Per “Three Bees”, 1814; farmer of Airds ?

1820 Apr 13

On list of prisoners transported to Newcastle per “Elizabeth Henrietta”; listed as Reddy (Reel 6007; 4/3501 p.342)

1820 Jun

On list of prisoners at Newcastle claiming expiration of sentence; listed as Reddy (Reel 6007; 4/3502 p.76)

1824 Oct 2

Farmer of Airds. Memorial (Fiche 3106; 4/1839A No.806 pp.283-6)

1824 Aug

Re permission to marry Margaret Hyland in the Roman Catholic Church (Reel 6064, 4/1789 p.112; Reel 6013, 4/3512 p.293)

1825 Nov 2

Of district of Airds. Memorial (Fiche 3152; 4/1844A No.679 pp.163-6)

1825 Dec 9

Convict landed from “Henry Porcher” assigned to at Airds; listed as Reddy (Reel 6016; 4/3516 p.104)

IN THIS YEAR : 1797 : JOHN CURTIS COMES ON THE GANGES

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article656255

The Hobart Town Gazette… Saturday 1 May 1819, page 2.

Account of prosecutions for forging Bank of England Notes, taken from the returns of the Bank Solicitor :-From 1783 to 1796 inclusive, there were 3 capital convictions and 1 acquittal, being only 4 prosecutions in 14 years- From 1797 to the 25th February 1818, there were 313 persons capitally convicted, 521 for having forged notes in their possession, and 164 acquittals, being 998 prosecutions in the space of 21 years ; of which 288 happened since the beginning of 1816,

20 16 jack jessie joyce & jean 1927

JACK, JOYCE AND JEAN WITH JESSIE SARAH NEE (READY) BELL

1927 : DESCENDANTS OF JOHN CURTIS.

 

 

 

See General Orders of March 10, 1797, and January 14,1804), with details of the rights of convict servants inc rates of pay,rations, hours etc.

 

 

                  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1089944

 

 

 

JOHANNAH READY AND THE ARCHDUKE CHARLES

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628633

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 20 February 1813, page 2.

The Archduke Charles, Captain JEFFRIES, left Portsmouth for Cork the 28th of March last, and arrived at the latter on the 28th, where she lay till the 16th of May  following, when she sailed for this Colony with 147 male

and 54 female prisoners. Of the men two died on the passage; namely, Arthur Culmady, aged 67, from the infirmities of age ; and John Lenna, a young man, from extreme debility. All the others arrived in apparent good health.

The delay of this ship’s arrival was occasioned by the loss of her rudder, shortly after her departure from Rio de Janeiro, which she left with the Minstrel and Indefatigable in company, the 11th of August. The 25th of September she arrived at the Cape of Good Hope to repair the accident ; and was detained there till the 19th of December, upon which day she resumed her voyage for this Port.

A few days before her departure a vessel arrived from England, from whence she had sailed the 1st of Oct. 1812,  and by which the pleasant accounts transmitted hither were received at the Cape. The account accompanying the report of the Archduke Charles’s arrival in last week’s Gazette was .consequently erroneous, in stating that the vessel which conveyed those consequential dispatches arrived at the Cape the 1st of October, instead of stating that to be the day on which she sailed from England.

By the Archduke Charles have arrived Lieutenants BURBRIDGE and CONNOR, of the 1st Battalion. 73d Regiment, with a detachment of thirty non-commissioned officers and privates, to join the Battalion.

 archduke charles sydney gazette 12 feb 1813

SYDNEY GAZETTE 1812 OCTOBER 24

article628559-3-001ARCHDUKE CHARLESThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 24 October 1812, page 3

article628633-3-001ACThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 20 February 1813, page 

JOHANNAH READY 1765-183?

PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON ON THE GOLDFIELDS

GAZETEER OF NEWSPAPERS ON VICTORIAN GOLDFIELDS.

FROM PHIL READY’S READY OR NOT

PETER MARK READY 1829-1862 AND SARAH ANN BENSON 1830 -1910

http://lynnesheritage.myheritage.com/FP/home.php?authenticate=0bfaa109c6ae44ec7b86fe3956a1983147e9d271-117890811

On the 21st April 1851 Peter Mark Ready aged 21 married Sarah Ann Benson at St Mary’s Cathedral Sydney. The ceremony was conducted by John Kavanagh and witnessed by Peter Mark’s sister Bridget and their cousin William Curtis. The first of their five children Sarah Ann Ready . named after her mother, was born on the 7th March 1852. ( Sarah Ann Benson – daughter of Thomas Benson and Hannah Hutchings )

Caught up by Gold fever Peter Mark set out with Sarah and their daughter for White Hills in the Maryborough district of the Victorian Goldfields.

The road up from Melbourne through Castlemaine was crowded with traffic of all kinds whilst the town of Maryborough was made up of canvas and very lively. Freight was 40 pounds per ton from Melbourne  and flour sold at famine prices. However, as mutton was quite cheap, the whole town lived on that and damper. The water supply came from the deep creek at Carlsbrook five miles away and sold for 1 shilling 6 pence a bucket. The gold lead however ran for 8 miles with a great deal of it on the surface and some very rich gold was obtained. because of the shortage of water the washdirt had either to be stacked until the rains  came or carted to Carlsbrook.

The mine at White Hills was sunk through what was known as white cement but once through into the pipeclay underneath the nuggets picked out paid the men very well for their hard work. Gold was found in almost every hole dug despite the distance from water and within three months of its beginning there were 30 000 men on the field.

It was here at White Hills living under these conditions in a canvas shelter with a shortage of water and an open fire for cooking that the second of Peter Mark and Sarah Ann’s daughters was born. Elizabeth Hannah on 30 march 1853, followed 4 years later on 12th June 1857 by their first son Peter. Three years later again on the 12 January 1860 Catherine Louisa was born, hopefully by now in something a little more substantial.

Hearing of a rich new discovery of gold at Back Creek near Amherst which was situated on the main road between Castlemaine and Adelaide  and where gold had been discovered by a party of travellers in 1852, Peter Mark    decided to try his fortune there. Packing their few possessions the family set out for the new diggings at Back Creek.

Amherst had been the centre of the district with many hotels and businesses and in 1857 a hospital had opened which was to operate for another 76 years.

The diggings at back Creek had commenced in late 1858 when a few parties of diggers were prospecting in shallow ground skirting the two flats near Amherst later famous as Kangaroo and Scandanavian Flats. A lead following down to one of the fltas bottomed out at a depth of fourteen feet on some very rich paydirt and very soon there  were 30000 men working on this field. Other leads were soon discovered nearby and these turned out to be the richest three fields in the Colony. Nuggets from 10 to 80 ounces were often found and one party found 64 ounces in their first lead of washdirt.

With the number of men growing at such a rate at Back Creek it was only a short time before framed  calico covered stores arose with tools , clothing, provision, bottles of ales and spirits and other items required by diggers brought up from Melbourne in carts and wagons.  These were soon disposed of by the storekeepers and the hawkers who threaded their way around town.

With the amount of gold being dug up money was abundant and as a result business was brisk. Soon there were dancehalls, billard rooms, barber shops and restaurants and by 1860 Back Creek had taken over from Amherst as the district’s centre A substantial Police Camp already existed in the town by this to deal with the unruly elements which usually tagged onto these mining towns. The town also had its own Gas Works and the Courthouse Hotel ( later it was to boast 40 hotels ).

  By 1861 the name of the town had been changed to Talbot and a fine theatre , The Theatre Royal, which played to packed houses and was unfortunately burnt down later that year , was built. A Brewery and a Court House were also completed  and a private hall later to become the Town Hall erected.

On the 2nd June 1862 tragedy struck Peter Mark’s Family at Back Creek.

Peter Mark had commenced work at 8pm with several of his mates at their claim at Rocky Flat. After about 1 1/2 hours at the windlass, Peter Mark and some of the others stood around a fire near the claim. When the others left, Peter Mark, Franci Park and Robert Louden went to a shanty nearby where they drank 3 gins each. According to Francis Park , they were all quite sober when he (Francis) went to his tent, whilst Peter Mark and Robert Louden returned to the windlass. Louden suggested that they have something to eat or lie down for  a while but Peter Mark was determined to work and started to wind up the windlass. Louden then went to assist him and they wound up the bag of mullock to the top.

After securing the windlass Louden turned to help Peter Mark take the bag off the rope but found him missing. He called for assistance and Francis Park ran over to assist in removing the bag.

Mathew Green who was working one hundred feet below at the bottom of the shaft heard some gravel fall and then a noise like a bag falling. He had just stepped back into a drive where , about ninety to a hundred feet along, another mate was working , when Peter Mark crashed heavily to the bottom.

Mathew called to the others to get a  doctor . They secured Peter Mark to the rope and hauled him to the top but as the doctor stated he was quite dead, his neck being dislocated and his skull fractured.

At the subsequent inquest, the jury brought in a verdict that Peter Mark was accidentally killed by slipping down a hole at Rocky Flat and that no blame attached to any of his mates.

Peter Mark’s funeral was held on Thursday 4th June 1862, just nine weeks after the birth of his second son , Henry James Ready, on the 31st March. The funeral which cost 7 pounds 5 shillings was paid for by George Moore whose father , also George Moore, had arrived aboard the Atlas I on its second voyage to the Colony arriving on 24th July 1822 from England.

The Talbot Times of Friday 6th June 1862 carried an article:

A sad accident happened on Monday evening last at Rocky Flat resulting in a miner named Peter Hogan ( surname of Thomas Hogan his stepfather) meeting with a very sudden death. The particulars of this melancholy case are reported in full in another column to which we refer our readers. The accident happened about two and one half hours after the various ‘night shifts’ had commenced their work in their claims and on it being known along the lead all the miners to the number of 150 ceased work and hoisted flags to half mast high on their claim as a token of respect for the departed.

That accidents of this nature are not more frequent on our leads is somewhat surprising when we pause to consider how  unprotected are all of the shafts and how, in the darkness of the night, men work at the mouth of their claims as though they bear a charm against accident. The funeral of the deceased took place yesterday and was attended by a very large number of persons chiefly miners.

The deceased leaves a widow and five children in destitute circumstances and for whose relief a subscription has been opened. “

Devastated by the loss of her husband and her means of support, left in this newborn town of miners and those whose livelihood depends on them, with five young children to feed Sarah was in a perilous position. It was fortunate that John Thomas Hogan, Peter Mark’s half-brother was around. He supplied the information for Peter Mark’s death certificate although he was unaware of what Peter Mark’s father’s given name was and as so often happens in cases where people are faced with a sudden crisis such as this , John Thomas got the name of his sister-in-law wrong giving it as Sanders instead of Benson ( interesting ! ) .

The other miners too had been most considerate  and had not only shown their respect by stopping work but had rallied to aid the grief stricken widow.

Peter Mark’s grave , no longer evident, at Amherst Cemetery bore the name of PETER Mk READY HOGAN.

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/05/23/hannahs-family/

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/more-about-hannah/

OTHER SITES OF INTEREST.

http://www.oldnewscopy.com/search/resultform.asp 

http://www.oldnewscopy.com/search/resultform.asp

http://www.oldnewscopy.com/search/resultform.asp

CHILDREN OF PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON

  • SARAH ANN                 1852
  • ELIZABETH HANNAH   1853
  • PETER                         1857
  • CATHERINE                 1860
  • HENRY                         1862

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

LYNNE SANDERS-BRAITHWAITE

JOHN READY AND THE THREE BEES

Governor Macquarie wrote:

The Three Bees, commanded by Captn. John Wallis, arrived on the 6th inst. with two hundred and ten male Convicts, out of 219 originally embarked, the other nine having died on the passage; and out of those landed, it has been necessary to Send fifty five to the Hospital many of them being much affected with Scurvy and others labouring under various complaints. On enquiring into the cause of this mortality and sickness, it appeared that many of them had been embarked in a bad state of health, and not a few infirm from lameness and old age. I am happy in being enabled to state that the Convicts by the Catherine and the Three Bees have, without a Single Exception, borne grateful Testimony to their having been treated with the most unremitting care, Attention, and kindness, by the Masters and Surgeons of those Vessels, from the day of their Embarkation until they were finally landed here. The circumstance of several of those unfortunate men being embarked in a diseased or feeble State will, I trust, shew (sic) the necessity for greater attention being paid to the state of the Health of the Convicts, who are to be embarked in future, which I have much reason to believe has not been so fully attended to by the Examining Surgeons as Humanity demands

Despatch No.8 of 1814 from Governor Macquarie to Earl Bathurst, dated Sydney, NSW, 24 May 1814

ACK WITH THANKS : From Philip Ready’s READY OR NOT.

JOHN READY c 1790-1831

John Ready was born circa 1790 to ? Ready and Johannah nee Cavenagh in the ancient town of Limerick ,constructed during the 9th century on the shore of the River Shannon which flowed through South Western Ireland into the Atlantic Ocean. Nothing is known about John’s childhood  but when he was arrested at the age of twenty two he was a tall sandy haired young man with hazel eyes and a fair complexion working as a garden labourer.

John was tried along with John Morgan a forty year old shoemaker from from Tipperary , at the assizes in County Tippery ? in August 1812, for the numerous felonies which they had committed together. Found guilty, each was sentenced to 14 years transportation to New South Wales and were moved to Cork to await their ship.

It was 13 months before the transport THE THREE BEES built and launched at Bridgewater earlier that year and on her maiden voyage arrived at Cork on a sultry  Wednesday in the early Autumn of 1813. She had taken her first convicts at Canal Docks in Dublin on ThThe ursday August 26th and now on September 22nd was to take on the rest of her compliment. The small prison hold was very crowded and John, standing 5’10 1/2 ” tall would have found it particularly cramped as those over 5′ in height were unable to stand upright.

Thirty five days later on Wednesday 27th October 1813, the THREE BEES sailed out of Cork harbour to join a convoy at Falmouth England. There she waited for another five weeks with the temperature plummeting  as Autumn turned to Winter. Some of the prisoners were suffering severely for they had been aboard in their tiny prison for over three months but , coming from hardy stock, as they did, there were very few among them sick when she sailed on Sunday 5th December 1813 for Rio de Janeiro.

Stormy weather during the voyage meant that the prisoners were often not allowed to go on deck and the conditions in the crowded prison were terrible for many of the prisoners suffered from sea sickness. The stench from this, from their unwashed bodies and body wastes were very hard to bear.

At Rio having crossed the Equator, it was Summer and extremely hot but the prisoners were quite freely allowed on deck with the prison temperatures  dropping six to eight degrees when the prisoners were all out. One man died of fever but when the ship sailed on Thursday 17 Feb 1814 there were very few sick among them.

Ten days later after leaving Rio the lookout sighted a strange ship. Worried that they might be attacked Captain John Wallis ordered the convicts’ bedding to be brought on deck to forma  barricade. A sudden downpour of rain soaked the bedding and they found it impossible to get it dry before nightfall ( The Convict Ships – Bateson)

(Both the Broxbornebury and Surrey I were in the fleet which originally set out. http://melindakendall.wordpress.com/  An ancestor of Janice Maurice- Hugh Kennedy – was also on the THREE BEES . His daughter Elizabeth Kennedy married John Taylor one of whose descendants married Agnes Sanders
Hugh Kennedy born about 1768 was indicted for having in his custody at Belfast on August 1812 a counterfeit Bank of Ireland note for one pound two shillings and ninepence knowing it to be forged transported for 14 years age 44 occupation weaver.
The Three Bees only made one voyage after her arrival in 1814 she caught fire near Government wharf and exploded in the harbour then drifted onto the rocks at Bennelong point where she burnt to the water line.
Hugh died in march 1843 he owned land in Grose Street Parramatta.
)

The prisoners were advised not to use their damp bedding but rather than sleep on the bare boards most chose to ignore the warning.  Scurvy broke out and seven prisoners died due to their weakened state and lack of fresh fruit and vegetables.

On the THREE BEES’ arrival in Sydney on Friday 26 May 1814 fifty five of the remaining one hundred and twenty one prisoners were taken to  hospital. Many of these were affected by scurvy and some with other complaints. Contrary to the earlier on their state of health on embarkation. “on enquiry  it was claimed that many had embarked in a bad state of health and that not a few were infirm from lameness or old age. but all bore grateful testimony  to having been treated with unremitting care,attention and kindness from the time of their embarkation to landing” . (HRA Series I Vol 8.P.)

John then is sent to Windsor where his convict mother Johannah Ready nee Cavanagh –  is housekeeper at Government House.

 

RELATIONSHIPS OF  JOHN READY

Individual    Relationship    Steps
JOHN READY    JOHN READY is the home person    0
PETER MARK READY    PETER MARK READY is a son of JOHN READY    1
READY    READY is the father of JOHN READY    1
JOHANNAH CAVANAGH    JOHANNAH CAVANAGH is the mother of JOHN READY    1
ELIZABETH CURTIS    ELIZABETH CURTIS is the wife of JOHN READY    1
PETER ( GEORGE) READY    PETER ( GEORGE) READY is a grandson of JOHN READY    2
SARAH ANN BENSON    SARAH ANN BENSON is a daughter-in-law of JOHN READY (the wife of his son)    2
FRANCIS PRENDERGAST    FRANCIS PRENDERGAST is the step-father of JOHN READY    2
JOHN CURTIS    JOHN CURTIS is the father-in-law of JOHN READY    2
ANN MORAN    ANN MORAN is the mother-in-law of JOHN READY    2
THOMAS HOGAN    THOMAS HOGAN married the same woman as JOHN READY    2
JESSIE SARAH READY    JESSIE SARAH READY is a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    3
JULIA JACKSON    JULIA JACKSON is the wife of a grandson of JOHN READY    3
THOMAS BENSON    THOMAS BENSON is an in-law of JOHN READY    3
HANNAH HUTCHINS    HANNAH HUTCHINS is an in-law of JOHN READY    3
GEORGE MOORE JNR    GEORGE MOORE JNR is the husband of a daughter-in-law of JOHN READY    3
JOSHUA CURTIS    JOSHUA CURTIS is a half-brother of the wife of JOHN READY    3
FRANCIS CURTIS    FRANCIS CURTIS is a half-brother of the wife of JOHN READY    3
WILLIAM CURTIS    WILLIAM CURTIS is a half-brother of the wife of JOHN READY    3
BENJAMIN CURTIS    BENJAMIN CURTIS is a half-brother of the wife of JOHN READY    3
THOMAS CURTIS    THOMAS CURTIS is a half-brother of the wife of JOHN READY    3
WILLIAM CURTIS    WILLIAM CURTIS is a half-brother of the wife of JOHN READY    3
JOHN CURTIS    JOHN CURTIS is a half-brother of the wife of JOHN READY    3
CHARLOTTE CURTIS    CHARLOTTE CURTIS is a half-sister of the wife of JOHN READY    3
ANN CURTIS    ANN CURTIS is a half-sister of the wife of JOHN READY    3
SARAH CURTIS    SARAH CURTIS is a half-sister of the wife of JOHN READY    3
ELIZABETH CURTIS    ELIZABETH CURTIS is a half-sister of the wife of JOHN READY    3
CURTIS    CURTIS is a direct descendant of the father-in-law of JOHN READY    3
JANE PURRIER    JANE PURRIER is the step-mother of the wife of JOHN READY    3
JACK BELL    JACK BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (4 generations; great-great-grandson)    4
JEAN BELL    JEAN BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (4 generations; great-great-granddaughter)    4
BETTY BELL    BETTY BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (4 generations; great-great-granddaughter)    4
JOYCE BELL    JOYCE BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (4 generations; great-great-granddaughter)    4
WILLIAM ALLEN BELL    WILLIAM ALLEN BELL is the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    4
WILLIAM BELU JACKSON    WILLIAM BELU JACKSON is an in-law of a son of JOHN READY    4
ELIZABETH JOHNSON    ELIZABETH JOHNSON is an in-law of a son of JOHN READY    4
WILLIAM JACKSON    WILLIAM JACKSON is a brother of a daughter-in-law of a son of JOHN READY    4
SARAH A JACKSON    SARAH A JACKSON is a sister of a daughter-in-law of a son of JOHN READY    4
JACKSON    JACKSON is a sister of a daughter-in-law of a son of JOHN READY    4
HENRY SAMUELS    HENRY SAMUELS is the husband of an in-law of JOHN READY    4
ANTHONY BELL    ANTHONY BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
MICHAEL BELL    MICHAEL BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
PETER BELL    PETER BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
MARGARET BELL    MARGARET BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
CAROLINE BELL    CAROLINE BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
JULIE BELL    JULIE BELL is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
NITA SAVAGE    NITA SAVAGE is the wife of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    5
DAVID BURTON    DAVID BURTON is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
ROSS CARTER    ROSS CARTER is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
NEVILLE JOHN CARTER    NEVILLE JOHN CARTER is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
KEITH DUIST CARTER    KEITH DUIST CARTER is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
JON SANDERS    JON SANDERS is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
LYNNE SANDERS    LYNNE SANDERS is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
CHERYL BURTON    CHERYL BURTON is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
SUSAN SANDERS    SUSAN SANDERS is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
JANINE CARTER    JANINE CARTER is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
WILLIAM DUIST CARTER    WILLIAM DUIST CARTER is the husband of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    5
ALFRED ROY BURTON    ALFRED ROY BURTON is the husband of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    5
BRUCE SANDERS    BRUCE SANDERS is the husband of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    5
JOHN BELL    JOHN BELL is the father-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
MARY ANN MCNEIL    MARY ANN MCNEIL is the mother-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
NORMAN BELL    NORMAN BELL is a brother-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
LESLIE  D.R. BELL    LESLIE  D.R. BELL is a brother-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
JAMES A BELL    JAMES A BELL is a brother-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
ROY MCNEIL BELL    ROY MCNEIL BELL is a brother-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
MARY HENRIETTA BELL    MARY HENRIETTA BELL is a sister-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
WILHELMINA ELIZABETH BELL    WILHELMINA ELIZABETH BELL is a sister-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
JANET BELL    JANET BELL is a sister-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
ANNE MCLEOD BELL    ANNE MCLEOD BELL is a sister-in-law of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    5
MATTHEW CARTER    MATTHEW CARTER is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (6 generations; great-great-great-great-grandson)    6
DIONE CARTER    DIONE CARTER is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (6 generations; great-great-great-great-granddaughter)    6

JIM ROBERT BRAITHWAITE    JIM ROBERT BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (6 generations; great-great-great-great-grandson)    6
BENJAMIN POMROY    BENJAMIN POMROY is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (6 generations; great-great-great-great-grandson)    6
JOSEFINE DEWBERRY    JOSEFINE DEWBERRY is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (6 generations; great-great-great-great-granddaughter)    6
CASSANDRA POMROY    CASSANDRA POMROY is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (6 generations; great-great-great-great-granddaughter)    6
KATI BRAITHWAITE    KATI BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (6 generations; great-great-great-great-granddaughter)    6

MARK POMROY    MARK POMROY is the husband of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    6

JOHN GEORGE SANDERS    JOHN GEORGE SANDERS is the father-in-law of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    6
ELIZABETH CRAIG    ELIZABETH CRAIG is the mother-in-law of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    6
JAMES BELL    JAMES BELL is a grandfather of the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    6
WILHELMINA MCLEOD    WILHELMINA MCLEOD is a grandmother of the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    6
NORMAN BELL    NORMAN BELL is an uncle of the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    6
GARY BELL    GARY BELL is a nephew of the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    6
ELAINE JOY BELL    ELAINE JOY BELL is a niece of the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    6
MARGARET SWAN    MARGARET SWAN is a sister-in-law of the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    6
THOMAS R MCLENNAN    THOMAS R MCLENNAN is a brother-in-law of the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    6
STANLEY WITCHARD    STANLEY WITCHARD is a brother-in-law of the husband of a great-granddaughter of JOHN READY    6

MADELINE POPPY BRAITHWAITE    MADELINE POPPY BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of JOHN READY (7 generations; great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter)    7

JOLENE MACDONALD    JOLENE MACDONALD is the wife of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    7
JAI GAMBLING    JAI GAMBLING is the husband of a direct descendant of JOHN READY    7

SARAH AND GEORGE MOORE.

SARAH AND GEORGE MOORE. 19TH CENTURY

 

IN 1988 , PHILIP READY  DISTRIBUTED A FAMILY HISTORY OF THE READY FAMILY TO THE MEMBERS OF HIS FAMILY. MUCH WORK HAD BEEN PUT INTO THIS AND HE ISSUED IT IN THE FORM OF 45 PAGE BOOKLET WHICH HE CALLED ” READY OR NOT” . I HAVE JUST ACQUIRED HIS CONTACT DETAILS AND WILL WRITE AND ASK FOR PERMISSION TO PUT IT ONLINE.

IN THE MEANTIME HERE ARE SOME OF THE FAMILY DETAILS WHICH HE SO PAINSTAKINGLY RESEARCHED  WITH HIS WIFE LOIS IN PRE-INTERNET DAYS WHEN THIS WAS NO SMALL TASK.

 

SARAH WAS BORN SARAH ANN BENSON. 

Her parents were THOMAS BENSON and HANNAH HITCHINS ( HUTCHINS. HUTCHINGS) and both had come to Australia as convicts. 

THOMAS BENSON – 1802 -1832

HANNAH HITCHINS – 1803 -1864.

THOMAS BENSON

Thomas was a black-haired , 5’3″ tall, brown complexioned twenty year old  maker of steel toys when he was brought in the 4 December 1822 Middlesex Gaol Delivery to Court. Thomas was tried and sentenced to transportation for life to The Colony of NSW. He ha been apprehended on 30 October 1822 when he attempted to steal , along with two others, five shirts valued at 20 shillings and two handkerchiefs valued at 2/-  . These were the goods of one Sarah Spencer. Sarah Spencer lived with her mother who was a laundress in Vinegar Lane , Commercial Road, London.  The three men had been standing nearby  at about 7.45 pm when Sarah stepped out of a shop in Gravel Road with a bundle of of clothes  and a pair of shoes.

One man grabbed the bundle of clothes and the second had run off close behind whilst the prisoner, Thomas, had held Sarah for a couple of minutes to aid the escape of the other two. When Sarah had screamed for assistance Thomas had also run off after the other two but had been apprehended before he reached them. ( Old Bailey Trials. Reel 30 No. 28 page 12 ML . These can now be read online. )

In April of 1823, Thomas was one of 172 convicts from the Leviathan and York Hulks who were placed aboard the OCEAN II.

According to James McTernan, Surgeon and Superintendent aboard the Ocean II, the 85 or so convicts from the YORK Hulk were of the most unsavoury character: ” who had made attempts to escape , in which some had perished; who had attacked the clergyman in the performance of his functions and who had declared  their determination to take possession of the OCEAN II on her passage to NSW. Mc Ternan also stated that the men of the Leviathan ” were men of good conduct and fair character. “

 

HANNAH HITCHINS

On 25 June 1823, 16 year old Hannah Hutchins was tried at the Old Bailey  for stealing from a dwelling place  and sentenced to death. Apparently this was later commuted to transportation for life to NSW. 

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

911. MARIA WILLIAMS and HANNAH HUTCHINS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , at St. Andrew, Holborn , thirty-three yards of poplin, value 2 l., the goods of Miles Metcalf , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES WILSON . I am shopman to Miles Metcalf , a linendraper , who lives in High Holborn . On the 20th of May, between six and seven o’clock in the evening, I was called down from tea, and found the prisoners in the shop, and as they were going out, I said I suspected they had something which did not belong to them; Hutchins denied it – Williams desired her to give it up if she had anything; she still persisted that she had nothing. I sent for a constable, and before he came Hutchins took the poplin from under her clothes, and gave it to me – it measured thirty-two yards, and is worth exactly 40 s., it cost us 1 s. 4 d. a yard – we should sell it for 5 s. or 6 s. more. Williams begged hard to be let go, and said she would take the print away, and pay the money if we would let them go; she said nothing about the poplin. Hutchins said she had never seen it after she had given it up – she could not account how it got under her petticoats. They at first said they had not enough to pay for the print, which came to 8 s. 3 d., but 14 s. was found on one of them.

JOHN LATIMER CLARK . I am servant to Mr. Metcalf; the prisoners came to the shop, and both asked to see a printed cotton; I saw Bow the shopman who is not here, shew them a great many. I was behind the counter opposite to them, about a yard from them; they were about ten minutes looking at them, and did not like any of them. I saw Hutchins convey a piece of figured poplin under her petticoat; she rather stooped to do it; Williams was close to bet, she did not put it on the side Williams stood, but Williams came on the other side of her at the time, and held up a printed cotton, while she was doing it, and asked me the price of it. I immediately ran up stairs and told Wilson, who came down with me, they were than paying 1 s. deposit for a print – they were going out, and he said, he thought they had something which did not belong to them, Hutchins denied it. I left them with Wilson, while I fetched Collins, the officer.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a constable. I was fetched. Wilson gave me the poplin and the prisoner’s in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS’S Defence. I was coming along Holborn, and met Hutchins very much in liquor. She asked me to go with her to buy a gown, and I went with her, not knowing that she meant to steal.

HUTCHINS – GUILTY – DEATH . Aged 16.

WILLIAMS – NOT GUILTY .

On December 6,1823, the complement of women prisoners and several passengers were aboard the ship BROTHERS and ready to depart.  Setting a light sail the BROTHERS pulled out from the pier at The Downs, set her sails and glided out of the harbour bound direct for the Colony and Hobart Town. ( Letter to Sir Thomas Brisbane from James Hall, Superintendent of the BROTHERS. 4/1774 Reel 2662 pp 41-50 and 4/4009A  AONSW)

MORE TO COME. 10/5/08

 

LYNNE SANDERS – JOYCE BELL(SANDERS) – JESSIE SARAH READY(BELL) – GEORGE PETER READY – SARAH BENSON/READY/MOORE