Category Archives: NEW SOUTH WALES

BURROWING INTO THE INTERNET ARCHIVE

http://ia331302.us.archive.org/3/items/thepresentpictur15533gut/15533-h/15533-h.htm

MAP 1811 NSW

NEW SOUTH WALES

Chapter I.

Discovery of New South Wales.–Arrival of a Colony there from England.– Obstructions calculated to retard the Progress of the Settlement.– Departure of Governor Phillip.–Intervening Governors, until the Arrival of John Hunter, Esq. and his Assumption of the Government.– Printing Press set up.–Cattle lost, and Discovery of their Progeny in a wild State.–Playhouse opened.–Houses numbered.–Assessments for the building of a Country Gaol.–Town Clock at Sidney.–Natives.– Convicts.–Improvement of the Colony.–Seditious Dispositions of the Convicts.–Departure of Governor Hunter.–His Character and Government.– Comparison of Stock, &c.–Governor King assumes the Command of the Settlement–Table of Specie Vessel laden with Spirits sent away.– Earthquake.–Inundation at the Hawkesbury.–First Criminal for Forgery executed.–Atlas struck by Lightning.–Tempests.–Desertions of the Convicts.–Newspaper established.–Murders.–Singular Execution.–Lieutenant–Governor Collins forms a new Settlement.–Insurrection of the Convicts.–The Introduction and Progress of Vaccination, and its subsequent Loss.–Influx of the Sea at Norfolk Island.–Limits of Counties defined.–Ship overset in a Tempest.

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THE MAIL TRAINS

The Story Of Our Travelling Post-Offices SOMEBODY POSTED A COW (LATE FEE) The Sunday Herald (Sydney,… Sunday 29 October 1950

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18482520

AN ARTICLE EXPLAINING THE MAIL TRAINS OF NSW.

The Story Of Our Travelling Post-Offices

SOMEBODY POSTED A COW

(LATE FEE)

By GORDON COLEMAN

ALMOST half the mail handled by Australian post-offices is sorted in mail vans as New South Wales

express trains roar through the night at 50 to 60

miles an hour.

THIS is the way the Post

office saves time in de-livering letters for all parts of the Commonwealth.

New South Wales is the only State with this system. The reason is its geographical position in the Commonwealth and the length of its railway network.

All sorts of articles are sorted and once a cow technically became late fee (overweight).

The 74 specially selected officers who operate the five main lineT.P.O.s have good cause to be proud of the branch’s record, for not one man has been charged with pilfering since the inception of the service nearly 80 years ago.

The T.P.O. service starts at the Mail Custodian’s room, Central Station, where 10,000 bags approximately II million articles are handled daily.

The room is connected to Sydney’s 23 platforms by a network of tunnels and lifts.

The T.P.O. itself is the mail van attached to express trains.

Each van is a large mail room staffed by men who must know the location of 4,500 towns and villages in the State.

To assist them remember these names the Department prepared613 stories. Each story was named after a central town and included all post-offices served by the central district office.

On the Northern T.P.O. to Glen Innes there are 143 central and1,000 district post-offices.

A short story to cover Aberdeen and its six small district offices

reads:

Aberdeen: Davis (Davis Creek), the Dean of Aberdeen,fired darts into the brook (Dart-brook) that were made of rough shell (Rouchell Brook) (UpperRouchell). When the darts burst there was à danger in the field(Dangarfield) so the Dean advised the spectators to watch the game from the brush on the hill (Brushy Hill).

 

WHEN I joined the North Coast T.P.O., and accompanied the first shift from Sydney to Kempsey, grey-haired, jovial. Mr. L.B. ("Tim") Young was in charge.

Mr. Young has travelled more than 14 million miles during his 33

years.

His assistants were Messrs. Gordon Donovan and Jim Fordham.

They had been working in the van for three hours when the train left at 8.15 p.m.

The bag rack was "dressed" with180 bags and the sorting bench was covered with letters, packages and parcels.

This post-office is travelling at 60 miles per hour, but you’d never guess it by looking at the sorters.

"Tim" Young was sorting into150 pigeonholes.

The majority carried no town identification, but he said, "You get to know where they are."

As the train gathered speed I was

tossed from side to side.

"It’s rougher in here than in a carriage," said Gordon Donovan."I hope you don’t get train sick like some of our chaps who have. had to toss in the job because they were sick for the whole journey."

When the train reached the North Coast line it was much rougher.

1 hung on with both hands for hours, but the T.P.O.. men were standing firm footed and swaying with the van as the express roared through the thickly timbered north coast country at speeds of from30-60 m.p.h.

They flicked letters into pigeon-holes, bundles and parcels into bags, and wrote out despatch notes.

These men have been over the ‘track so often that they can instinctively pinpoint the train’s position although working within the enclosed mail room.

"Tim" Young would pick up a bag, walk to the back of the van and toss from the open doorway as a platform was reached.

His action was mechanical, and

the bag would drop on a barrow or a

slide across the platform to the stationmaster’s office.

"Tim" Young said: "When I was on the South they used to call us the travelling ghost. For years I threw out mail in the darkness to people I had never seen, but I always felt I knew them.

"On the North-west, the boys are in closer contact with people living beside the line in the outback.They see them in daylight. One of them makes up parcels of lollies and gifts which he throws with the mail for the children.

You see some funny mail

matter at times. I have even seen a cow posted late fee.

"That happened on the South some years ago. The cow was discovered when I went to the back of the van to collect some bags.

"The cow remained there until we chased it out at Cootamundra.

"We afterwards learned that one of our own chaps ‘posted’ the cow while we were asleep during the day.

"Our biggest problem is handling letters which people address with a via. We don’t want via on any mail matter. The town of destination is sufficient.

When the train was nearing Kempsey Gordon Donovan picked

up a newspaper and moved to the doorway.

"Must not miss my little blonde,"

he said.

Out went the paper, to be caught by a pyjama-clad four-year-old girl who was standing at a tent doorway.

The T.P.O. men had a 10-hour break at Kempsey while a relief staff went on to South Grafton.

In the evening they rejoined the van on the return trip to Sydney.

To save time, the Post-office often has to send mail AWAY

from the point for which it is intended.

For instance, mail for Queens-land loaded at Grafton doesn’t go direct to Queensland ‘. but back towards Sydney for 150 miles

on the North Coast=Sydney mail train while it’s sorted out. Then completely sorted-it’s thrown on

to the north-bound Brisbane Ex-press at Taree.

On the return trip 112 suburban bags were added to the rack,

This enables suburban mail to be delivered direct to its destination without passing through the

G.P.O.

City sorters will soon be attached to the T.P.O.s to sort city letters and have them ready for delivery on arrival of the train at Central.

COLONIAL MOTHERS

THE SAG Newsletter reports that Dr Tanya Evans, now of Macquarie University, is engaged in researching the history of motherhood in early Colonial Australia and Britain between 1750 and 1850. The focus has caught my fancy. My Mind seems to have taken a disproportionate amount of time in recovering from the Change of year and the Summer Season and I haven’t been able to get my mental historical  hard drive functioning at all but this little article has begun to bring the ghosts back to life again. Dr Evans is asking for assistance from any who have worked extensively on their family histories and have details of mothers from these early times. Dept of Modern History at Macquarie University, Sydney would have the contact details for you.

As for me, it has me thinking of all the Mothers of Mine who and the folkore I have been given. The Scottish Widow who was asked to be Laird of the Clan but came out here with her children instead.  Johannah Ready Prendergast, whose son John was sent as a convict to Government House at Windsor where his mother was Housekeeper. I wonder often about Johannah who was 47 when convicted in Ireland. She tried to have another son and his family sent out but failed. When John’s marriage failed and he became excessively odd in his behaviour and was sentenced to Moreton Bay, Johannah disappears from the records. I like to think she followed him.

Ann Moran and Hannah Hutchings/Hitchens. What was it like for them to be mothers here in the early 19th Century ? Young convict women. Ann had 5 children to John Curtis who was already husband and father to a family in England and had attempted to have them brought to him.  Hannah was recorded as a ‘ loose woman’ on the convict ship THE BROTHERS. How did her life as a mother develop from that starting point and from the death of her first husband in the Lunatic Asylum, Liverpool ?

TRIAL BAY AND SOUTH WEST ROCKS

trial bay

TRIAL BAY WAS built in a later period than what I’m usually looking at. The connection with South West Rocks was earlier for my direct family. I do however have documents and images from Jan Maurice and Sanders’ were out there as Boatsmen and running a boarding house as well as one lad being remembered in the Memorial Pines. Killed in the war. So we took a drive out there on our recent 2 week Loop and took a look through the Boatsmen’s Houses which are carefully maintained and where,as usual, we encountered enthusiastic and helpful volunteers hanging on to our heritage with Tenacity. Below are some links to TRIAL BAY and some images from our exploration.

TRIAL BAY GAOL

Established in 1886, Trial Bay Gaol is the only example of a state prison specifically built to carry out public works. The intention was for prisoners to construct a breakwater in Trial Bay and create a safe harbour between Sydney and Brisbane.

http://www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au/clicka.htm

KEMSPEY AND THE MACLEAY RIVER

 

http://www.australianexplorer.com/photographs/nsw_architecture_trial_bay_gaol.htm

Trial Bay (Gaol) Photos – (New South Wales)

 

http://www.nnsw.com.au/southwestrocks/trialbay.html

TRIAL BAY GAOL Photo Gallery

 

http://migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/places/zivillager/history.shtml

ZIVIL LAGER

 

http://www.collectionsaustralia.net/org/Trial_Bay_Gaol_National_Parks_and_Wildlife/about/

Trial Bay Gaol National Parks and Wildlife : COLLECTIONS AUSTRALIA NETWORK

 

TRIAL BAY IN 2001  
NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 120 NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 117
NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 121 NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 119

 

TRAVELLING THE MID NORTH COAST

PORT TO TAREE 027

INTERNET ARCHIVE: HORACE DEAN ON THE MANNING

 

Portrait of a pioneer.
Horace Dean on the MANNING.
Author: Hunt, Edward
Subject: Dean, Horace 1814-1887; New South Wales — Biography
Publisher: Wingham, N.S.W. : Printed by The Chronicle, 19–
Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT

http://www.archive.org/details/portraitofpionee00huntrich

 
0102DR READ ON MANNING 0103MANNING

http://www.archive.org/stream/portraitofpionee00huntrich

This book on INTERNET ARCHIVE is not copyrighted and features chapters and illustrations about early days on the MANNING.Many family names are mentioned as well as place names.

0013DR AND MRS DEAN 

0116

Chapters include:

BIRTH OF A NEWSPAPER

BLACKS AND BUSHRANGERS

THE HASTINGS

PORT MACQUARIE

http://www.archive.org/stream/portraitofpionee00huntrich

No relatives of ours are mentioned as far as I can determine but it provides a profile of the times when the first of our Manning families arrived .

PARRAMATTA THROUGH THE NLA NEWSPAPERS

JOHN CURTIS AND ANN MORAN WERE GRANTED LAND IN PARRAMATTA IN 1809 .

THE EVENTS OF THE CURTIS ERA WERE REPORTED IN THE SYDNEY GAZETTE – NOW THANKFULLY ONLINE. FOLLOW THE LINKS TO THE WORLD OF THE EARLY 19TH CENTURY OUT AT PARRAMATTA.

 

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 2 April 1803, page article625496-3-001

EVERY Person throughout the Colony, professing the Roman Catholick Religion, is to attend at Government House, Parramatta, on Wednesday the 20th of April Inst. at ten o’clock in the forenoon ; previous to which, those residing about Sydney are to give their names, places of abode, &c. to the  Rev. Mr. Dixon ; to the Magistrate’s Clerk at Parramatta ; and to Thomas Arndell, Esq, at Hawkesbury. By Command of His Excellency W. N. Chapman, Sec. Government House, April 12, 1803.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625514

 

REGULATIONS TO BE APLIED TO REV DIXON AND ALL CATHOLIC  OBSERVANCES.inc police being stationed at all services.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625535

 

 

( John Curtis and Ann Moran )

With other ROMAN CATHOLIC members of the community, JOHN CURTIS signed a petition to J T  BIGGE for a ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPEL when Bigges came out to the Colony to investigate and report on how it was going. ( 20 Feb 1820 Bigges Report app p 3943).

 

 

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625496

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 2 April 1803, page 1.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625427 THE INSURGENTS AT CASTLE HILL
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625475

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 26 March 1803, page 4

EXECUTIONS RESULTING FROM CASTLE HILL UPRISING.

SOME MORE SANDERS STORY FROM JAN AND BARRY MAURICE

1. WILLIAM SANDERS m SARAH STARK c 1768 probably at Tifford outside KENTON near EXETER DEVON.

2. Their son  WILLIAM was baptised on 11/11/1792 at Tifford and was probably born the same day or the day before according to the custom of the time. He later married ELIZABETH GREEN. Their son :

3. WILLIAM was born at KENTON on 15/4/1823. He married MARY ANN SKIVINGS who was born in 1830. Mary’s parents were both born at KILLERTON ( also known as Broad Clyst) near EXETER, Devon.  Her mother, GRACE, was born in 1804. William and Mary  arrived in Sydney on board the VICTORIA on 2/9/1849, Mary possibly pregnant with their first ( surviving ) child.

They settled in the MACLEAY DISTRICT. Oral history has it that William was invited to come to Australia by a retired British Army Colonel to be employed as an expert ploughman having become known as such back in Devon. William is also reputed to have introduced blackberries to the North Coast. This act of folly earned him the nickname ” BLACKBERRY BILL”. William was also a champion rower and rowed in the Kempsey Regatta of 1856. William died on 19/12/1910 aged 87. Mary died on 13/11/1882 aged 52, the mother of 13 children.

Husband    WILLIAM SANDERS   

Birth    Apr. 15, 1823    KENTON DEVON ENGLAND   
Marriage    Aug. 28, 1848    EXETER ENGLAND   
Death    Dec. 19, 1910    FREDERICKTON KEMPSEY   
Burial        FREDERICKTON   
Other Wives       
Parents    WILLIAM SANDERS and ELIZABETH GREEN

Wife    MARY ANN SKIVINGS   

Birth    About 1830    SILVERTON DEVON ENGLAND   
Death    Nov. 13, 1882    FREDRICKTON KEMPSEY NSW AUSTRALIA   
Burial        FREDERICKTON CEMETERY   
Other Husbands       
Parents    GEORGE S SKIVINGS and GRACE 

Children  

1    ELIZABETH GRACE SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Oct. 28, 1850    HORSLEY NSW   
Husband    EDRED EVERSON   
Marriage    Aug. 3, 1868    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Jan. 30, 1904    KINCHELA NSW   
Burial    

2    HARRIET FRANCES SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jun. 4, 1852    YARRABANDINI NSW   
Husband    THOMAS ROWE   
Marriage    Dec. 6, 1869    KINCHELA NSW   
Death    Oct. 13, 1942    DUNGOG   
Burial        

3    WILLIAM GEORGE SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Feb. 11, 1854    YARRABANDINI NSW   
Wife    ELIZABETH HURELL   
Marriage    Jul. 30, 1879    KINCHELA NSW   
Death    Aug. 10, 1923    SOUTH WEST ROCKS NSW AUSTRALIA   
Burial    

4    FREDERICK JOHN SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Oct. 18, 1855    MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Wife    LUCY JANE HURRELL   
Marriage    Apr. 11, 1878    KINCHELA   
Death    Jan. 23, 1921    MARRICKVILLE SYDNEY AUSTRALIA   
Burial   

5    CHARLES HENRY SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jan. 1, 1860    AUSTRAL EDEN   
Wife    MARY ANN PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Aug. 17, 1881    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Jul. 16, 1926    MACKSVILLE   
Burial    

6    ALFRED SIVERT SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jan. 4, 1861    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Wife    EMILY JANE MINCHEN   
Marriage    Apr. 29, 1886    SMITHTOWN   
Death    1933    KEMPSEY   
Burial  

7    ERNEST ALBERT SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Dec. 21, 1862    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Wife    ANNIE JANE PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Jun. 9, 1886    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Nov. 20, 1911    UPPER UNKYA   
Burial    

8   MARY ANN SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Nov. 17, 1864    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Husband    JOSEPH ISAAC HARRIS   
Marriage    Jun. 7, 1885    AUSTRAL EDEN   
Death    Dec. 4, 1941    BRISBANE   
Burial  

9    WALTER THOMAS SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Mar. 18, 1867    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife    ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Jul. 10, 1895    KEMPSEY   
Death    Jan. 24, 1922    KEMPSEY   
Burial    

10    AGNES JANE SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jul. 9, 1869    KINCHELA CREEK MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Husband    CHARLES HENRY WILLIAM  TAYLOR   
Marriage    Nov. 25, 1891    ST LEONARDS   
Death    Aug. 6, 1951    QUEENSLAND   
Burial        LUTWYCHE CEMETERY BRISBANE  

11    EDRED JAMES SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Oct. 2, 1870    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife    ANNIE EDITH NELSON   
Marriage    Dec. 25, 1912    WEST KEMPSEY NSW AUSTRALIA   
Death    Mar. 26, 1938    KEMPSEY   
Burial    

12   SARAH ELLEN SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jan. 27, 1872    KINCHELA CREEK   
Husband    ROBERT EVAN KITCHING   
Marriage    Oct. 26, 1895    SYDNEY AUSTRALIA   
Death    Feb. 9, 1946    CAMPBELLTOWN   
Burial 

13    CHRISTOPHER GEORGE SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jul. 3, 1873    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife       
Marriage           
Death    Jan. 3, 1882    KINCHELA CREEK   
Burial       

 

   

 

      

 

      

         

   

 

the SANDERS COME TO KEMPSEY

Jan Maurice descends from AGNES JANE TAYLOR. The parents of Agnes were WILLIAM SANDERS and MARY JANE SKIMMINGS ( Elsewhere recorded as MARY ANN SKIVINGS Name on birth certificate ). Agnes was born the 10th child on 9th July 1869 in Kinchela NSW.

From papers received from JAN and BARRY.

AGNES JANE TAYLOR

AGNES JANE SANDERS

WILLIAM, her father, was an expert ploughman and was brought out to the Colony from DEVON UK for his skills. While in Kinchela he had a keen interest  in rowing and was a champion oarsman who rowed in the Kempsey Regatta 1856 and entered many races. He was also known as Blackberry Bill as he spread the seeds around the Kempsey District.

The youngest brother of Agnes, CHRISTOPHER, was accidentally shot by his brother’s rifle  on 3 January, 1882, when he was 9 years old. Mary  Jane was a midwife in the district.

William died 19 December 1910 age 87 years and Mary died 13 November 1882 aged 52 years.

When Agnes was 22 she was living in “BROMPTON” Anson St Surry Hills. She was a domestic servant married in St Thomas Church of England Willoughby NSW , November 25th 1891 to Charles William Henry ( Bill) Taylor whose address was Appin , the Minister Stephen H Childe.

After the wedding they went to live in Appin on Elladale farm. Brooks Point Road, Appin. Every Saturday, she would drive the horse and sulky to Campbelltown so that their youngest son Barrington Walter could have piano lessons by Miss Vernon, then on Saturday nights he’d play for the local dance when still a teenager taking over from Bessie Dwyer. Their eldest son, William Harold joined the Army in 1916 as a 17 year old and served overseas, marrying Margaret ( Maggie) Yates when he was 21 years in Lancashire England.

Lionel ( Jack) stayed on the farm. Two girls married and moved to Queensland to live another daughter, Ellen, Mrs Gridley.

On the 9th April at 64 years Bill died and was buried in St Marks Cemetery, Appin. No headstone.

When Barrington married Phyllis Abbott in 23 December 1935, Agnes went to the wedding at St John’s Parramatta and the reception at the CAROLLIAN. Her address was Appin.

In her later years, Agnes came to live in Campbelltown with Lionel and his wife in 28 Chamberlain St Campbelltown. her younger sister Sarah with husband Robert Kitchings also lived in Campbelltown and when sarah died 15 February 1946, Agnes Jane was the last of William and Mary’s family alive. She was in her 80s but still did beautiful  crocheting and knitting. Agnes died in Queensland  8th August 1951. Buried in Lutwyche Cemetery.

 

 

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne%27s-heritage-web-site

 

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS

A LETTER FROM JOSEPH LAURIE

The BELLS were closely associated with the LAURIES and LAURIETON.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article814750

TIMBER RESERVES.

(To the Editor of the Maitland Mercury.)

SIR,-I notice in your issue of the 8th inst., a letter on the reservation of timber, signed by Thomas Shaw, I believe some of his hints are good, and as this is a matter which concerns many, perchance a hint from one who has had 40 years’ experience may not be out of place. So I will be as brief as possible, and confine myself to a few remarks only.

First-The wilful and shameful destruction of timber. At present the law is, that any man holding a license can go on to Government land (except Reserves) and cut away at any tree or sapling he thinks fit. No one has a right to interfere with him, so long as he holds his license ; he is never asked what he means to do with the timber he falls. No doubt you will say, surely no man on earth will fall timber without making use of it. But I can prove to you that it has been done, and that in a wholesale manner. On the Nambucca there have been hundreds of trees, both cedar and pine, cut down many years ago. And they are still there, and will ever remain so, as they are now too rotten for any use. On Camden Haven, a few years ago, the inhabitants took a sudden fit and cut down every beech tree that could be found ; in fact millions of feet, and there it lies, rotting on the ground ; and many a tree of hardwood as well-and yet the people who cut the said timber had no way of removing it to market. So there it remains, a loss to the man who would have used it, a loss to the colony, and a loss to the world at large. And yet the present licensing system allows this wholesale destruction, Surely this system could be improved upon, and before I close I shall give you my idea on the matter, and I hope some of your readers will give a better.

Second,-I will now make a few remarks on the reservation of timber. Government has adopted a plan of making a reserve of certain portions of land in various places on the East Coast, for the sake of preserving timber. My opinion is, the plan is rotten in the core. The reserves are made where the best timber is to be found. So far so good. But tell me what they mean by preserving timber that has arrived at its full growth, and every day turning back to its mother earth. This seems to me to be wilful waste, and almost as bad as the men who cut timber and leave it to rot. I may be wrong, but I am against all special timber reserves. I would say, throw it open, and let us have free trade, and encourage colonial industry. At the same time I would make it the special duty of the local constable to ascertain if each man had a license, and what they were cutting for ; see that they mean to use the timber they ore cutting down. And above all, see that no hardwood timber is cut down less than two feet, or six feet in girth, three feet from the ground. This would be preserving timber in the right way ; for timber in this country does not take so long to grow as some think it does, I know large trees that were only saplings thirty years ago ; and at this place we have trees a foot through that were only whipsticks six years ago. And Mr. Hibbard, of Port Macquarie, tells me he knows trees at Shoalhaven three feet through that were mere saplings seventeen years ago (spotted gum). I will now draw to a close, and I trust that some other hand will take the matter up. I have merely given my own opinion, and I think any one who does so deserves a certain amount of credit, let him be right or wrong If I was to go on and state the use and durability of each kind of tree I do not know where I would end.

Third.- This much I may say : people must not run away with the idea that because timber is of a certain kind it must be good. Such is not the case. For instance, the ironbark at this place is a poor wood indeed ; at Gloucester, the kitchen at the old accommodation house was shingled with ironbark shingles in the year 1836, yet the roof is waterproof. It depends on the ground and locality where the timber is grown, In the school house, in Port Macquarie, the rafters are saplings, known as the leaf tea-tree ; and although they were put there under the cruel lash and the bitter years of tyranny, yet the said rafters are as sound as the day they were put there.

-Yours respectfully,

J0SEPH LAURIE.

Laurieton, 14th January, 1881.

[We need scarcely say that we shall be glad at any time to receive and publish letters such as the above, and we hope the important subject of timber conservation will receive due public attention till amendment in the law and “practice is achieved.

James Bell was transported for housebreaking in 1831. He married Wilhelmina McLeod on 29/9/1840 at the SCOTS CHURCH, PATERSON. Wilhelmina was the daughter of WILLIAM MCLEOD and JANET MACKAY and was 17 years old when she married JAMES.

Their son , JOHN BELL, married Mary Ann McNeil in Taree on 27th June 1878. At the time John gave his place of residence as RAWDON VALE , district of Gloucester. Roy Burton was told by a now deceased aunt that John’s parents were James and Wilhelmina which we now know to be so.  Witnesses to the marriage of John and Mary Ann were JOSEPH LAURIE and MARGARET BELL. Joseph Laurie Snr owned property at RAWDON VALE locality. The witness Joseph Laurie was probably the fifth son of Joseph Senior. (Refer to “EARLY HISTORY OF THE CAMDEN HAVEN” Page 16. The LAURIES.The LAURIES were then living at PEACH GROVE now known as LAURIETON.

John’s eldest sister married a LAURIE. His brother NORMAN BELL married AGNES FRASER whose mother was JANET LAURIE and named their daughter JANET LAURIE BELL.

When John Bell and Granny Bell left the Tweed they lived the rest of their lives in LAURIETON.

__________________________

An article with Joseph Laurie presiding as magistrate

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article862425

The Maitland Mercury… Thursday 23 November 1882, page 6

__________________________

 

10 12 laurieton hotel

LAURIETON HOTEL 10 2 laurieton

STATISTICS OF NEW SOUTH WALES, FROM 1837 TO 1853.

STATISTICS OF NEW SOUTH WALES,

FROM 1837 TO 1853.

(From the Herald, July 4.)

The following is a condensed account of some of the Statistics of the Colony, for a period of sixteen years, compiled from official records in

the Colonial Secretary’s office. They were placed upon the table of the Legislative Council on the 28th of last mouth, and ordered by the Council to be printed.

POPULATION.

The following is the return of the increase and decrease of the population of New South Wales, from the 1st January to 3ist December, 1853; and of the total number at the latter date :

INCREASE.-By immigration : males, 23,189 ; females, 10,738; total, 33,936. By birth: males, 4,493; females, 4,367 ; total, 8,860.

TOTAL INCREASE.-Males, 27,69l ; females, 15,105 ; being a total increase of both sexes of 42,796.

DECREASE.-By deaths : males, 2,311 ; females, l,865; total, 4,173. By departure: males, 12,699 ; females, 2887 ; total, 15,586.

TOTAL DECREASE,-Males, 15,010; females, 4952 ; making a total decrease in both sexes of 19,962.

NET INCREASE.-Males, 12,681 ; females, 10,153 ; making a total net increase of 22,834.

Population on 31st December, 1852; males, 118,687; females, 89,597 ; total, 208,254.

Population on 3lst December, 1853: males,v131,368; females, 99,720 ; total, 231,088.

IMMIGRATION.

The following is a return of the number of

immigrants who arrived in the colony of New

South Wales, from the 1st January 1832, to the

31st December, 1853 :

IMMIGRANTS AT THE PUBLIC EXPENSE.-In

1832.792; in 1833, 1253; in 1834, 484 ; in

1835,545; in 1836, 806; in 1837, 2664; in

1838, 6102; in 1839, 7852; in 1840, 5216; in

1841, 12,188; in 1812, 5071; in 1843, none;

in 1844, 2726; in 1845, 497; in 1846, none;

in 1847, none; in 1S48, 4376; in 1849,8309;

in 1850, 4078 ; in 1851, 1846 ; in 1852, 4981 ;

in 1853, 10,412; total, 80,200.

IMMIGRANTS AT THEIR OWN EXPENSE.-In

1832, 1214; in 1833, 1432; in 1834, 1080; in

1835, 883; in 1836, 913; in 1837. 813; in

1838, 1328; in 1839, 1983 ; in 1840, 1306 ; in

1841,1598; in 1852, 1534 ; in 1843,967; in.

1844, 485; in 1845, 461; in 1846, 402; in

1847, 515; in 1848,651; in 1849, 1492; in

1850,559; in 1851, 756; in 1852, 3781; in

1853, 3355; total, 27,508.

GENERAL TOTAL OF ARRIVALS.-In 1832,

2006; in 1833,2685; in 1834, 1564; in 1835,

1428; in 1836, 1721 ; in 1837, 3477; in 1838,

7430; in 1839,9835; in 1840. 6522 ; in 1841,

13,786; in 1842, 6605 ; in 1343, 967 ; in 1844.

3211 ; in 1845, 958; in 1846, 402 ; in 1847,

515; in 1848, 5027 ; in l849, 9801 ; in l850,

4637; in 1851,2602; in 1852,8762; in 1853,

13,767; total, 107,703.