Category Archives: MORAN ANNE

Exhibitions | Discover Parramatta

EXHIBITIONSParramatta has a collection of quality exhibition spaces within the city. The Parramatta Artists Studios, the Heritage Centre and the Riverside Theatres are the main gallery-style spaces in Parramatta and they host a number of compelling exhibitions throughout the year. ICE; the Information and Cultural Exchange, an arts-based organisation supporting creative arts development in Western Sydney, is based in Parramatta. They produce or support a large range of creative pursuits (workshops, performances, industry networking events) and some of these involve exhibitions of new work. Other ‘expo’ style exhibitions occur too, most of these taking place at the Grand Pavillion at Rosehill Gardens Racecourse. A diverse range of interests are showcased over the calendar year from Quilting and Craft and Golfing to Parenting, Careers, Caravans and Camping…. even Country Week comes to town.

Source: Exhibitions | Discover Parramatta

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JUST IN FROM BRIAN AHEARN. BOOK LAUNCH OF BEYOND THE SEA AND THE ATLAS LOG

Atlas Log copy Beyond the Sea two volumes copy Atlas Log copy Press Release Beyond the Sea•  There are two volumes with a limited special first edition binding.
•  Each book is hard-bound in green leather and blocked in gold.
•  There are 1,300 pages with 753 illustrations, Including a bibliography and index.
Separate to the two volumes is the log book of the convict transport ‘Atlas’. A total of 363 pages,
The following is an overview of content:
On the morning of November 29, 1801, a heavy wooden wagon, lumbered through the streets of Cork and moved slowly in the direction of the port of Cobh. Absorbing the bumps in the springless cart was a young sworn United Irishman named Murtagh Ahern and his two brothers John and Michael. They had been sentenced to suffer death for rebellious outrages and the brutal murders of all the male members of a Tithe-Proctor’s family at Croom in County Limerick.
    Their commuted sentences to life ‘beyond the sea’ would see them chained below the deck of the ‘Death ship’ Atlas and spend 220 agonising days amongst sick, hungry and disease ridden inmates.  It would be the worst voyage in the history of Irish convict transportation to the infant colony of New South Wales. Sixty-five convicts, including his brother John, would join the sufferers on their voyage to the deep.
    At 2 o’clock on July 6, 1802 Murtagh arrived in Port Jackson with his brother Michael. They would suffer, but survive, the most turbulent times in the history of Australia. Murtagh would marry English convict Mary Abbey. They would produce seventeen children and become one of the pioneer families of Liverpool. He worked for Lieutenant Edward Lord in Van Diemen’s Land and under Lieutenant-Governor David Collins. In 1810 he received a pardon from Governor Lachlan Macquarie. He became a constable, a hotelier and a prominent farmer on the Georges River.
    This is the story of an ordinary Irishman who arrived in Sydney, his neck and ankles locked in heavy irons and chains, with only a tattered shirt and trousers to protect him from the extreme elements. Penniless, sick, hungry and treated as a beast of burden, he was classed as an inferior being, one on the scrap heap of humanity. Murtagh had been and continued to be confronted by some of the most extraordinary circumstances and times in our history, yet he showed immense courage and compassion and overcame his predicament to create a large family of many proud ‘native Australians’. He lived up to his family motto:
Per ardua surgo
     I rise through difficulties
This book gives a sweep of Irish history from Murtagh’s ancestor Brian Boru the High King of Ireland, the dark days of Oliver Cromwell, the horrors and privations of the 1798 Irish rebellion to the discovery and founding of Australia. It details the struggles of succeeding Governors and the characters who made Australia what it is today.  The second volume also covers the early Irish family records of Murtagh and Mary’s family in Mileham. The background of their seventeen children is also included.
•  There are two volumes with a limited special first edition binding.
•  Each book is hard-bound in green leather and blocked in gold.
•  There are 1,300 pages with 753 illustrations, Including a bibliography and index.
Separate to the two volumes is the log book of the convict transport ‘Atlas’. A total of 363 pages,
The following is an overview of content:
On the morning of November 29, 1801, a heavy wooden wagon, lumbered through the streets of Cork and moved slowly in the direction of the port of Cobh. Absorbing the bumps in the springless cart was a young sworn United Irishman named Murtagh Ahern and his two brothers John and Michael. They had been sentenced to suffer death for rebellious outrages and the brutal murders of all the male members of a Tithe-Proctor’s family at Croom in County Limerick.
    Their commuted sentences to life ‘beyond the sea’ would see them chained below the deck of the ‘Death ship’ Atlas and spend 220 agonising days amongst sick, hungry and disease ridden inmates.  It would be the worst voyage in the history of Irish convict transportation to the infant colony of New South Wales. Sixty-five convicts, including his brother John, would join the sufferers on their voyage to the deep.
    At 2 o’clock on July 6, 1802 Murtagh arrived in Port Jackson with his brother Michael. They would suffer, but survive, the most turbulent times in the history of Australia. Murtagh would marry English convict Mary Abbey. They would produce seventeen children and become one of the pioneer families of Liverpool. He worked for Lieutenant Edward Lord in Van Diemen’s Land and under Lieutenant-Governor David Collins. In 1810 he received a pardon from Governor Lachlan Macquarie. He became a constable, a hotelier and a prominent farmer on the Georges River.
    This is the story of an ordinary Irishman who arrived in Sydney, his neck and ankles locked in heavy irons and chains, with only a tattered shirt and trousers to protect him from the extreme elements. Penniless, sick, hungry and treated as a beast of burden, he was classed as an inferior being, one on the scrap heap of humanity. Murtagh had been and continued to be confronted by some of the most extraordinary circumstances and times in our history, yet he showed immense courage and compassion and overcame his predicament to create a large family of many proud ‘native Australians’. He lived up to his family motto:
Per ardua surgo
     I rise through difficulties
This book gives a sweep of Irish history from Murtagh’s ancestor Brian Boru the High King of Ireland, the dark days of Oliver Cromwell, the horrors and privations of the 1798 Irish rebellion to the discovery and founding of Australia. It details the struggles of succeeding Governors and the characters who made Australia what it is today.  The second volume also covers the early Irish family records of Murtagh and Mary’s family in Mileham. The background of their seventeen children is also included.
PS
It maybe an opportunity to visit, prior to the talk, Murty and Mary’s headstone in Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park.
The park is a fitting reward for the wonderful work that Liverpool City Council has done in restoring the headstones of its pioneers.
It is estimated about 15,000 people are buried there. Only about 10 such cemetery parks exist in NSW.
The Park is located on the corner of Campbell, Macquarie Street and the Hume Highway in Liverpool.
Hi everyone,

 
Some good news.

 
As you know, Murty and Mary Ahern along with their numerous children were one of the pioneer families of Liverpool.
 
On hearing of the books, and log of the Atlas, the City of Liverpool Library and Museum enthusiastically asked to become involved in launching the books.
 
They have generously made the Gold Room in their magnificent library available as a venue.
 
The launch is part of Liverpool City Council’s on-going support of Liverpool and Australia’s historical heritage. 
 
 
The presentation, including visuals, titled ‘Irish Rebel to Liverpool Pioneer’ will be on Wednesday, 27th November 2013 at 5pm. 
It will include a unique display of rare documents and convict Australiana never before seen in Australia.
 
Some details:
 
Light refreshments at 4pm. 
 
Venue is the Gold Room at the Liverpool City Library 170 George Street Liverpool. Parking is available at the rear of the library.
 
Please confirm your attendance by calling Liverpool City Library on 98219422 by Friday 22 November 2013.
 
Further information is available by contacting Julie Senior who is co-ordinating the event.   email: j.senior@liverpool.nsw.gov.au

IRISH REBELS FROM THE SAME SHIPS AS ANN MORAN

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), Saturday 5 March 1803,

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625437

HERCULES ATLAS The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW  1803 - 1842), Saturday 5 March 1803,

HERC ATLAS 2 The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW  1803 - 1842), Saturday 5 March 1803,

HERC 3 The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW 1803 - 1842), Saturday 5 March 1803,

FURTHER REPORTS

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625804

Execution at Castle-Hill. (1803, October 2). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842), p. 3.

ALSO ON THE HERCULES

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626112

Family Notices. (1804, April 1). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627010

SYDNEY. (1806, January 19). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 – 1842

THE IRISH REBELS 1800-1806–ANN MORAN.

Irish Rebels to Australia 1800 – 1806

This database contains details of Irish convicts who were transported to New South Wales in the period 1788 – 1849.

Rebel remnants of the 1798 and 1803 Irish Rebellions were transported to NSW during the period 1800 – 1806.

The ships that these Rebels came in were:

The exact number of Rebels sent cannot be ascertained due to the poor state of information on the Shipping Indents. Only the Minerva identifies all her Rebels on board. The highest figure can be put at nearly 800 while the lowest is conservatively placed around 325.

Following the demise of the 1798 and 1803 Irish Rebellions, a number of the leaders and high-risk rebels were kept either in Kilmainham gaol or in prison ships. The lucky ones were those that had been sent to North America.

Reprisals after the Rebellions caused great ill feeling throughout the troubled lands of Insurrection Ireland. The government could not contemplate releasing those martyrs of Irish freedom back to their native land.

These Rebel remnants were transported to New South Wales with the hope that none would ever return. However a few did manage to accomplish this task.

ANN MORAN

ANN MORAN

Lynne Fiddick said

April 8, 2011 at 12:02 am

I am not related to Ann or John, however are you aware of the relationship between Ann and Henry Perts? They applied to marry in May 1822 and appear to have been together for a number of years (until about 1828). Henry was listed in the 1825 census with Ann as “his wife” although it does not appear they were formally married. She appeared for him in 1828 when he was charged and convicted of selling spirits illicitly. I am extremely interested in knowing all I can about Henry and wondered if you had any information about him at all.

Irish Convicts to Australia

http://www.claimaconvict.net/index.html

 

Lesley Uebel

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http://newsarch.rootsweb.com/th/read/AUS-PT-JACKSON-CONVICTS/2001-10/1001976898

Governor King to the Transport Commissioners
HRA – Aug 1802
Gentlemen,
I had the honor of receiving your letters and their several enclosures dated
as per margin by the Coromandel which arrived here 13th June, Hercules 26th
June, Atlas 6th July and Perseus 4th instant.
The above transports were cleared of all the prisoners, passengers,
provisions and stores, before the time limited for that purpose was expired;
and the Commissary has furnished the respective masters with receipts for
all that was landed here.
The healthy state in which the Coromandel and Perseus arrived requires my
particularly pointing out the masters of those ships to your notice. It
appears by the log books, surgeon’s diaries and the unanimous voice of every
person on board those ships that the utmost kindness had been shown by the
masters and surgeons to the convicts. This, with the proper application of
the comforts Government had so liberally provided for them and the good
state of health all the people were in, induced the master of the Coromandel
to proceed without stopping at any port. He arrived here in four months and
one day, bringing every person in a state of high health, and fit for
immediate labour; and altho’ it appears that the Perseus necessarily
stopped at Rio and the Cape, yet the convicts were in as good condition as
those on board the Coromandel; nor can I omit the great pleasure felt by
myself and the other visiting officers at the grateful thanks expressed by
the prisoners and passengers for the kind attention and care they had
received from the masters and surgeons, who returned, an unusual quantity of
the articles laid in by Government for the convicts during the voyage.
I am sorry that the conduct of the Masters of the Hercules and Atlas appears
to be the reverse of what I have just stated. By the surgeon’s list, and
the masters of the Hercules and Atlas’s letters to me, of which I send you a
copy, you will observe the dreadful mortality that raged on board those
ships, exclusive of the numbers killed. Altho’ there was no mutiny on board
the Atlas, yet in every other respect the master of that vessels conduct
appears as much if not more reprehensible than the other. The miserable
state the survivors were in in both those ships on their arrival in this
port, being filthy beyond description, some of the convicts lying dead with
heavy irons on, many of them died as they were coming from the ship to the
hospital. These circumstances, together with the complaints made against
the masters by the officers, rendered it necessary to investigate the
necessity of their having to put in Rio de Janeiro and the Cape, and how far
the masters had infracted the charter-parties. The result of these
investigations are enclosed. The log books and diaries will be forwarded by
the first direct conveyance mentioned in my letter of the 23rd ultimo.
The master of the Hercules was necessarily tried by a Court of
Vice-Admiralty on two indictments, first for killing ten men in the mutiny,
and afterwards for shooting one man (a ringleader), it was alleged, some
time after the mutiny had subsided. On the first count he was acquitted,
and on the second he was found guilty of manslaughter, and was sentenced by
the Court to pay a fine of 500 Pounds to the Orphan School, and to be
imprisoned until it was paid. As a doubt arose in my mind respecting the
propriety of his being fined, I have given a conditional remission of that
part of the sentence which I have referred to the judge of the Admiralty
Court, for His Majesty’s pleasure being signified thereon; and that the
course of justice may not be perverted (if I am wrong respecting the fine)
the master is bound over to abide by that determination and to surrender
himself within five days after his arrival in the port of London.
The master of the Atlas having such a quantity of private trade and spirits
on board, appears to have produced most of the bad consequences complained
of in that ship. What that private trade consisted of , and the bulk
occupied on board, will be obvious from the enclosed report of that ship’s
entry.
I have judged it necessary to forward this by the Hercules, in case she
should arrive in England before my letters which I mean to send by the
conveyance pointed out in my letter of the 23rd ultimo
I have, etc
Philip Gidley King

SHIP ON WHICH ANN MORAN ARRIVED.

______________________________________________

Mayberry Home Page

http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/

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Wicklow United Irishmen
1797 – 1804

http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/wicklow.htm

THE RISE OF THE DEFENDERS 1793-5

 

http://www.iol.ie/~fagann/1798/dfender3.htm

___________________________________________

Index to the Colonial Secretary’s Papers, 1788-1825

http://colsec.records.nsw.gov.au/indexes/colsec/default.htm

_______________________________________________

Deaths and Mutiny on convict vessels provoke a scandal

http://www.convictcreations.com/history/description.htm

Sydney, August 9. Despite the past disgraces of convict ships, and the regulations and warnings designed to improve their condition, two more vessels have arrived at Sydney in deplorable state, and with awful death rates.
The Hercules arrived on June 26 with the news that 30 convicts had died on the voyage and another 11 had been killed during a mutiny, with two dying later of their wounds and a third being summary executed by the captain.
The Atlas arrived on July 6, having lost 68 people through scurvy and dysentery.
Governor King described the ships as being "filthy beyond description. Some convicts were lying dead with heavy irons on, while many more died as they were coming to the hospital"
There has been an inquiry as to whether the masters had contravened their charters as convict carriers. The Governor noted that the Atlas was carrying liquor.

INFO ON JOHN CURTIS AND ANN MORAN COURTESY MARY WILSON

John Curtis was probably born in Daglingworth/Bristol England c 1750 and was married at St Phillips and Jacobs in Bristol to Jane Purrier in 1773. They had 10 children. John practiced accountancy until the early 1790’s .

In March 1795 he was tried and convicted at the Lent Assizes in Gloucester on 4 counts of “forging, counterfeiting, coining . . . silver coin of the realm called a sixpence”. He was sentenced to 7 years which was transmuted to transportation to Australia. He left England on the Ganges in August 1796 and arrived in Sydney on 2 June 1797.

In his first years in NSW he worked for the Government as a dairyman at Toongabbie. He was promoted to overseer and Superintendent of the Government herd in 1802.

John was emancipated on 4 June 1802 and the next year petitioned Governor King for permission to return to his family in England, unaware that his wife, Jane, had died from consumption in 1800. Despite his good reputation and that Governor Patterson, George Johnston and Rev. Marsden signed his plea he never returned to England.

In 1802, an Irish convict, Ann Moran arrived in NSW and was assigned to work for John. They eventually married in 1814 and had 5 children (not necessarily in that order).

In 1809 John was granted 80 acres of land at Liberty Plains (now Chester Hill), Sydney. Curtis Rd in Chester Hill runs across part of this land grant. By 1821 he owned a house in Parramatta, which he left to his oldest daughter, Betsy, 26 head of cattle and a mare, a 30 acre farm on Sydney Rd, near Haslem’s Creek (now Lidcombe), adjoining a grant of 100 acres made to Ann after John’s death. This land stayed in the family.

The Villawood Migrant Hostel in Millers Rd Villawood stands on John Curtis’s original estate.

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John Curtis Petition to Governor King in 1803

 

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This is from “Kings Papers” in Sydney Library. It was sent to me by Ken Eccleston about 15 (?) years ago. Looking at the handwriting it is very similar to my father’s handwriting (also a John) – he always had the reputation of having beautiful handwriting when he was young; may be it is inherited. Dad was also an accountant.


John Curtis Letter to Governor MacQuarie

 

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John died on 12 September 1821 and is buried at St John’s Pioneer Cemetery Parramatta.

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John Curtis Will:

 

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Ann Moran (c1767 – 1832)

Born c 1767 in Ireland. She was one of the first hundred Irish women convicts to come to Australia. She arrived on the “Hercules” in 1802 after being convicted in County Heath, Ireland.

After arrival she was assigned to work for John Curtis1 They eventually married on 6 August 1814 at St John’s Parramatta, NSW, and had 5 children, not necessarily in that order.

After John’s death in 1821 she applied for and was given a further land grant of 100 acres adjoining John’s original 30 acres in c1824.

Ann died ion 6 October 1832 and was buried at the site of Central Railway Station in Sydney. Later the original cemetery was moved to the Pioneer Cemetery at Botany.

SITES TO SEE : THE TIME OF ANN MORAN AND THE HERCULES.

http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1802.htm

http://www.convictconnections.org.au/shipsA-I.html

http://www.danbyrnes.com.au/blackheath/ships3.htm

http://www.historyservices.com.au/nsw_colonial_chronology_1770_1803.htm

http://www.jstor.org/pss/27516597

http://www.mcginleyclan.org/irishslaves.htm

 

EXTRACT FROM http://www.ulladulla.info/historian/1804deaths.html

Deaths 1804 NSW & Norfolk Island Early Colonial History Research and Indexed by Historian Cathy Dunn. 

Castle Hill

HUGHES

James

1804

SG 19 Jan 1806. Last week a native informed Tarlington, a settler, that the skeleton of a white man, with a musket and tin kettle laying beside him, had been seen under the first ridge of the mountains. The settler accompanied the native, and found the skeleton, and as described, the bones of which being very long, leads to a more than probable conjecture, that the remains are those of James Hughes, who absconded from Castle Hill the 15th of February 1804, in company with 15 others, most of whom had recently arrived in the Hercules, on the ridiculous pretext of finding a road to China, but in reality to commit the most unheard of depredations; the consequences of which were, that the whole except Hughes were shortly apprehended, and 13 capitally convicted before the Criminal Court, of whom two were executed, and 11 pardoned. Hughes was an able active man, well known in Ireland during the rebellion that existed in that country for his abominable depravities; and it is hoped his miserable end will warn the thoughtless, inexperienced and depraved against an inclination to exchange the comfort and security derived from honest labour, to depart from which can only lead to the most fatal consequences

Parramatta

HUMES

Samuel

Mar 1804

Leader in the 1804 Battle of Vinegar Hill – rebellion executed at Parramatta and hung in chains, Convict Hercules I 1802

________________________________________________________

 

Revolution, counter-revolution, and union

By Jim Smyth

PAUL FERGUS AND ANN MORAN AND JOHN CURTIS

 

Dear Lynne
I also am descended from John Curtis and Ann Moran through their daughter Catherine and George Eccleston. I am their third great-grandson.
In two weeks, my wife and I will be visiting Ireland and I am hoping that I might be able to do a bit more research on the ground about Ann as she certainly seems to have been a remarkable woman.
I am trying to resolve a number of discrepancies between various items of information in my possession.
The best information seems to indicate that she was convicted in Trim in Co Meath in 1797 (coincidentally the year that John arrived in Sydney)in connection with political activities and that she was held in jail in Ireland for five years before being transported to Australia on the Hercules in November 1801, arriving here on 26 June 1802. One record in the State Library implies that the prisoners on the Hercules were convicted for offences in the “late rebellion” which can only mean the United Irishmen in 1798 from the context.
I should be grateful for any information you can provide that might assist with my research in Ireland.
While visiting my son and his family in London after Ireland, I intend to return to Bristol to undertake more research into John Curtis. I obtained a lot of information 18 months ago including records of the marriage of John Curtis and Jane Purrier and of the baptisms of all 11 of their children in St Philip and St Jacobs Church in Cheese Lane, Bristol. From these records, I managed to visit the three streets in which they lived at the times of the births of different children. For most of their married life they lived in Cheese Lane, near the Church. I suspect that as his accountancy practice failed and he got into financial difficulties, the family was forced to move to less salubrious accommodation.
I also managed to obtain copies of one press report of John’s conviction and death sentence at Gloucester Assizes for coining. The judge must have been feeling sympathy for John because another man convicted and sentenced to death at the same sittings was immediately taken for “execution of the sentence” but the judge commuted John’s sentence to transportation for life.
After returning to Australia in April 2008, I managed to locate descendants of John’s and Jane’s youngest child in New York.
Paul Fergus

COLONIAL MOTHERS

THE SAG Newsletter reports that Dr Tanya Evans, now of Macquarie University, is engaged in researching the history of motherhood in early Colonial Australia and Britain between 1750 and 1850. The focus has caught my fancy. My Mind seems to have taken a disproportionate amount of time in recovering from the Change of year and the Summer Season and I haven’t been able to get my mental historical  hard drive functioning at all but this little article has begun to bring the ghosts back to life again. Dr Evans is asking for assistance from any who have worked extensively on their family histories and have details of mothers from these early times. Dept of Modern History at Macquarie University, Sydney would have the contact details for you.

As for me, it has me thinking of all the Mothers of Mine who and the folkore I have been given. The Scottish Widow who was asked to be Laird of the Clan but came out here with her children instead.  Johannah Ready Prendergast, whose son John was sent as a convict to Government House at Windsor where his mother was Housekeeper. I wonder often about Johannah who was 47 when convicted in Ireland. She tried to have another son and his family sent out but failed. When John’s marriage failed and he became excessively odd in his behaviour and was sentenced to Moreton Bay, Johannah disappears from the records. I like to think she followed him.

Ann Moran and Hannah Hutchings/Hitchens. What was it like for them to be mothers here in the early 19th Century ? Young convict women. Ann had 5 children to John Curtis who was already husband and father to a family in England and had attempted to have them brought to him.  Hannah was recorded as a ‘ loose woman’ on the convict ship THE BROTHERS. How did her life as a mother develop from that starting point and from the death of her first husband in the Lunatic Asylum, Liverpool ?

PARRAMATTA IN THE NLA NEWSPAPERS PT 2

REFER TO ANN AND JOHN CURTIS

 

JOHN WAS GRANTED LAND ON 17 DECEMBER 1809 BY GOVERNOR PATTERSON. LATER CANCELLED AND THEN RE-GRANTED BY MCARTHUR IN 1810.

SOME MORE BACKGROUND NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIA ARTICLES REFERRING TO PARRAMATTA OF THE EARLY 19TH CENTURY.

YEAR FAMILY NEWS NATIONAL LIBRARY HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS ARTICLES OF THE TIME
1809

 

On 17th December  1809 JOHN CURTIS was notified that Lt Gov Patterson had granted him land at Parramatta.

January 14, 1809.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627664

THE Lieutenant Governor has been pleased to appoint Mr. James Larra to be Vendue Master to the District of Parramatta. By Command of His Honor the Lieutenant Governor, Alexander Riley, Secretary. Head Quarters, Sydney, Jan, 14, 1809.

1810

JOHN CURTIS wrote a memorial to Gov Macquarie seeking confirmation of the grant. ( sm folio pp 4 1810 NSW Colonial Sec in letters and memorials 1810 AK NO 80 REEL 1066 AONSW

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627901

The Sydney Gazette and… Sunday 14 January 1810, page 1.

SOME OF THE OFFICERS WHO HELD OFFICE BEFORE THE LATE GOVERNOR WAS ARRESTED ARE RE-INSTATED TO THEIR POSITIONS INC REV FULTON.
SEE JOHN CURTIS

1811

 

Ann  too was proving to be a marvellous help and mother and on Wed 3rd July 1811 gave birth to their third son PETER.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628206

Clear orders from the Governor regarding illegal brewing of beer and spirits in Sydney and in the out-settlements which included PARRAMATTA. A list of names of people granted licences. Ann Moran is not listed here but in later years is issued with a brewing licence.

1812

During March 1812 there were again heavy rains and the Hawkesbury rose 12 feet over its banks. Flood years seemed to stir John’s spirit for on 7th December he further petitioned the Governor , this time for a free pardon which was granted

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628476

A property was listed for sale as follows

TO be SOLD by Private Contract, a very desirable FARM on the Road to Parramatta, from which it is scarcely a mile distant, known by the Name of Rafferty’s Farm, and now occupied by Mr. Edwards, The above is beyond dispute one of the most enviable Farms of its extent in the Colony, containing about 80 acres, and having a neat, commodious, agreeable, and substantial Dwelling-house near the high road, with every Appurtenance that can tend to convenience and accommodation, with Possession next July.- For particulars application is requested to Mrs. Walker,  at the End of Cumberland street, towards Dawe’s Battery.

1813

As cattle were always straying through the burial grounds  behind St Johns Church Parramatta, an appeal for funds towards enclosing the grounds was made, to which JOHN CURTIS subscribed ( Sydney Gazette Jan 1813).

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628632

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 13 February 1813, page 4.

An iron grey horse had also strayed – from Smith’s Paddock, at the PARK GATE near PARRAMATTA. The owner JAMES WRIGHT offered a 20 shillings reward.

1814

ANN MORAN and JOHN CURTIS MARRY
Catherine ( Kitty ) is born.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628939

The trial and tale of a sordid murder at the Turnpike at Parramatta. A story of RAGGED RASCALS and COARSE WOMEN. Of HOOLAGHAN and SUITAR. Of a yellow  handkerchief and a piece of lead worn in an ear.

1815  

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629070

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 7 October 1815, page 2.

The second Thursday of March meant that the half-yearly fair was to be held in PARRAMATTA and it was expected that it would be well attended.

IN addition there is an account of a fatal trip to the Shoal Haven and of the party sent to look for missing men. 

1816    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176963

The patronesses of the FEMALE ORPHAN INSTITUTION are named.
Mrs Wylde , Mrs Molle, Mrs Hannibal MacArthur and Mrs Macquarie.

1817  

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177429

THIS PRESENT SEASON OF SCARCITY.

A calamitous season of floods leads to Government Orders regarding rations. Details are set out in the article.

PARRAMATTA THROUGH THE NLA NEWSPAPERS

JOHN CURTIS AND ANN MORAN WERE GRANTED LAND IN PARRAMATTA IN 1809 .

THE EVENTS OF THE CURTIS ERA WERE REPORTED IN THE SYDNEY GAZETTE – NOW THANKFULLY ONLINE. FOLLOW THE LINKS TO THE WORLD OF THE EARLY 19TH CENTURY OUT AT PARRAMATTA.

 

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 2 April 1803, page article625496-3-001

EVERY Person throughout the Colony, professing the Roman Catholick Religion, is to attend at Government House, Parramatta, on Wednesday the 20th of April Inst. at ten o’clock in the forenoon ; previous to which, those residing about Sydney are to give their names, places of abode, &c. to the  Rev. Mr. Dixon ; to the Magistrate’s Clerk at Parramatta ; and to Thomas Arndell, Esq, at Hawkesbury. By Command of His Excellency W. N. Chapman, Sec. Government House, April 12, 1803.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625514

 

REGULATIONS TO BE APLIED TO REV DIXON AND ALL CATHOLIC  OBSERVANCES.inc police being stationed at all services.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625535

 

 

( John Curtis and Ann Moran )

With other ROMAN CATHOLIC members of the community, JOHN CURTIS signed a petition to J T  BIGGE for a ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPEL when Bigges came out to the Colony to investigate and report on how it was going. ( 20 Feb 1820 Bigges Report app p 3943).

 

 

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625496

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 2 April 1803, page 1.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625427 THE INSURGENTS AT CASTLE HILL
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625475

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 26 March 1803, page 4

EXECUTIONS RESULTING FROM CASTLE HILL UPRISING.

ANN MORAN CURTIS : FOLLOWING THE DEATH OF JOHN

 

ANN MORAN CURTIS : FOLLOWING THE DEATH OF JOHN

FROM PHIL READY’S READY OR NOT.

In his will JOHN CURTIS left everything to ANN in trust for his children, ELIZABETH, JAMES, JOHN, PETER and CATHERINE.

Ann having an equal portion in the rest. To his married daughter ELIZABETH READY he also left 10 head of cattle.

This left 26 head of cattle and 2 mares, a certain house in the township of PARRAMATTA , and a 30 acre farm along the SYDNEY ROAD which he had bought from JAMES WRIGHT. These were to be divided as evenly as possible between ANN and the children but if ANN were to remarry ad the childrens’ shares become endangered , then his friends, JOHN LACEY and THOMAS GARTY were to become the guardians of his children’s property until they were able to look after their own interests. Witnesses to his signature were JOHN LACEY, THOMAS GARTY and his son-in-law JOHN READY.

Two months after John’s death, a letter came from J MEEHAN ordering him to remove his herds etc from his land at TOONGABBIE as it was now required by the Government. ( NSW COL SEC in letters p 14 reel 2167 ) .

ANN had received a grant of 100 acres at PARRAMATTA ( Vol 18 p 169) and was leasing two small blocks nearby one of 36 perches ( Vol 16 pp 339 and one of 38 perches Vol 16 p 231 ) In 1822 she is reported as supplying yeast for the prisoner’s barracks at PARRAMATTA (A 766 p 2 ML)

As ANN’S brewing licence had expired although her eyesight had been damaged in an accident she went to SYDNEY on 5 MARCH 1822 to renew the licence. Upon her return she found that her brewery with most of its stock had been destroyed by fire. There was always the danger of this happening for at that time there were only wood fires for cooking or oil lamps for lighting. The fire was put out with the help of several people and in the 14th March Edition of the AUSTRALIAN Ann thanked them for their help. At the same time she circulated a petition for help from the local populace to get started in business again so that she could feed her children. ( petition to the people of SYDNEY from ANN CURTIS )

The 16 October 1822 edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE carried an advertisement from Ann advertising that she was leaving the Colony but in November that year a court case COOPER V CURTIS took place with the verdict being found in favour of COOPER.

On the 10 November 1822, J T CAMPBELL placed a notice in the SYDNEY GAZETTE,

Pursuant to levy I will cause to be set up and sold. one Cow and calf, 1 pig,a small quantity of sugar and sundry household items of furniture . I will further sell by auction at my office in HUNTER STREET at 12 noon the defendant CURTIS’ right, title and interest in and to the house wherein she now resides situated near the Turnpike gate at PARRAMATTA on the road leading to WINDSOR being on a corner of the road leading to the ORPHAN SCHOOL.

On Tuesday 25 November 1823 JOHN CURTIS’ request for land was granted ( too late for JOHN ) : 80 acres at PILGRIM HILL, LIBERTY PLAINS. (Bk p 4 D 225 ) . The following year 1824 on page 4 of the 19th February Edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE Ann’s home was again advertised for sale and she moved to the 30 acre farm on SYDNEY ROAD where in 1826 she was listed as  property owner ( Wentworth Papers A 767 p39).

As soon as he was old enough PETER CURTIS was apprenticed as a BUTCHER to WILLIAM SHARP in HUNTER ST SYDNEY and on 5 DECEMEBER 1828 gave sworn evidence for SHARP when SHARP was accused of dishonesty. Apparently Sharp was unable to read and signed a document read out to him by one BENJAMIN KIRKBY purported to be an agreement to lease a house which Kirkby was about to take from one MERRITH. it later turned out that what Kirkby had really tricked Sharp into signing was a bill of exchange for 50 pounds and it was only because of PETER being there at the time that he was able to appear as a witness for SHARP.

By 1828 John and Ann Curtis’ eldest son JAMES had reached the age of 22 and had met and courted MARY PARSONS born in the Colony in 1811. During the year they were joined in marriage and set up home together.

When the Census was taken in November of 1828, there were only 15 year old Catherine, Ann and 72 year old JOHN BRYAN left living at the SYDNEY ROAD property. Bryan had arrived on Sat 15 Feb 1806 aboard the TELLICHERRY and was working as a labourer for ANN.

(This census shows ANN as arriving on the ATLAS but careful research shows that none of the three Anns who arrived aboard that ship married a CURTIS. AS THE ATLAS and HERCULES had left the same port on the same day sailing most of the way together it is reasonable to assume that a mistake has been made in the entry.)

1829 saw the birth of a son JOHN HENRY to JAMES and MARY CURTIS and to ELIZABETH READY who had given birth to a daughter in 1826, a son- PETER MARK READY.

WHAT part if any ANN played in the events that shook the family in 1829-30 is not known but one day in 1830 her son-in-law JOHN READY arrived at her farm with some cattle which were branded JC on their rumps . These beasts he left at the farm and departed. The next day they were removed by the Police. Later JEREMIAH DALEY who lived at the farm testified that JOHN READY was the one who brought them there.

Two years later on 6 October at the age of 60, ANN died and was buried at the SYDNEY BURIAL GROUND, at that time where central Railway Station now stands. About 73 years after ANN’S burial, when the land was required to build the Railway Station and tracks her remains were transferred to the PIONEER SECTION of BOTANY CEMETERY where her headstone still stands today among those of numerous well known early settlers. 

 

2. JOHN CURTIS MARRIED 1814 TO ANN  MORAN

1 1803 ELIZABETH MARRIED 1820 TO JOHN READY
2 1806 JAMES MARRIED 1828 TO MARY PARSONS
3 1807 JOHN  
4 1811 PETER MARRIED 1842 TO ADELA AUSTIN
5 1814 CATHERINE MARRIED 1833 TO GEORGE ECCLESTON

JAMES CURTIS became a very successful cabinetmaker, upholsterer and UNDERTAKER carrying on his business in HUNTER STREET , SYDNEY and several times having to move into larger premises. After the death of his wife MARY in 1848, JAMES with a family of 7 children to care for remarried , his wife being ELLEN SWEENEY.

CATHERINE continued to live at the SYDNEY ROAD property until she married GEORGE ECCLESTON who had arrived in NSW as a soldier and was later a founding member of the NSW MOUNTED POLICE.

Very little is know of JOHN CURTIS JNR and although there is an interesting story of a JOHN CURTIS who was executed in 1828 for stealing a cow at BRINGELLY belonging to W C WENTWORTH, the account does not appear to tie up with our JOHN whom I believe was in the MOLONGOLO PLAINS AREA where he advertised in 1844 for three lost horses which had strayed. It was to this general area that PETER CURTIS and GEORGE ECCLESTON moved after their respective marriages with George setting up his cattle station BLACKFOREST near COOMA and PETER running a very successful cattle and butchering business there . The last known of JOHN JNR was at DIAMOND CREEK in VICTORIA . After that there were too many JOHN CURTIS’ to distinguish one from another.

PETER CURTIS raised a family of four girls and one son  and lived until 1885 , his wife ADELAIDE, having died in 1875 at the age of 52. 

CATHERINE and GEORGE ECCLESTON had a family of two boys and eight girls. both George and Catherine died in 1882. George on the 18 May and Catherine on 22 September at the age of 62.

THE NSW BEGINNINGS ARE WITH JOHN CURTIS AND ANN MORAN.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626806

No person whatever is to pass through or

into the Town of Parramatta, either by

night or day, with a musket , who has not

the Magistrate’s permission for that purpose.

By Command of His Excellency,

G. Blaxcell Acting Sec.

June 7, 1805

JOHN AND ANN PART 2. PARRAMATTA

FROM PHIL READY’S READY OR NOT.

KING’S successor WILLIAM BLIGH had even more trouble with MACARTHUR and the NSW CORPS as he was more interested in discipline than seeing the officers get rich for he well remembered the mutiny of his crew on the BOUNTY. So while JOHN and ANN  worked hard to build a future for their family which had grown to five with the birth of two sons, JAMES and JOHN, friction was building up between BLIGH and MACARTHUR.

The smaller settlers and emancipists  whom the Corps despised, backed BLIGH as he tried to bring the Corps under control and stop them abusing the privileges they had squeezed from his predecessors. On Friday 1st January 1808 as evidence of their backing they penned an address of loyalty to him , which JOHN CURTIS also signed.

Unfortunately, under the threat of financial ruin along with other signatories, John was forced to retract and sign another in favour of MAJOR JOHNSTON when MCARTHUR and the more influential settlers , feeling threatened by Bligh, persuaded Johnston to depose BLIGH and assume command himself ( Banks papers. vol 622 captan bligh and nsw corps 1906 1811 p 301).

As no provision had been made for settlers by the English Government when setting up the prison Colony, there was a great shortage of coins at this period so coins from other nationalities were put into use and IOUS and PROMISSORY NOTES came into circulation. John Curtis was unfortunate enough to lose one of these promissary notes and during March 1809 advertised in the papers for its return. ( Check the details on  https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/08/21/st-johns-church-parramatta-john-curtis-and-ann-moran/. They read a little differently with access to NLA ).

Leaving Lt Gov Patterson in charge McArthur and Johnston made the mistake of going to England to explain their actions to the English Government which was not amused by the way they had deposed BLIGH. Major Johnston was casheered and John McArthur exiled from the Colony for 8 years.

___________________________________________-

On 17th December  1809 JOHN CURTIS was notified that Lt Gov Patterson had granted him land at Parramatta. Eleven Days later Lachlan Macquarie Bligh’s replacement arrived and within a few weeks had assessed the situation and cancelled everything that had been done officially since Johnston had deposed Bligh ; all land grants, appointments and trials. It had been decided that the NSW CORPS was to become one of the ordinary regiments of the British Army and sent home.

With staggering speed Macquarie started to clean up the mess he had inherited for he found the population continually threatened with starvation, the buildings decaying and the morals of most of the population in the lowest state of debasement whilst religious worship seemed to be in a state of almost total neglect. Arrival of the grain ship MARIAN a fortnight after Macquaries arrival followed by a mild autumn and bounteous spring partly relieved the problem of feeding the starving community and Macquarie was able to concentrate on other matters needing his attention.

Cancellation of all land grants made during the rebel’s rule meant that JOHN CURTIS too lost the land granted to him by Lt Col Gov Patterson so he wrote a memorial to Gov Macquarie seeking confirmation of the grant. ( sm folio pp 4 1810 NSW Colonial Sec in letters and memorials 1810 AK NO 80 REEL 1066 AONSW). Macquarie as was his way when dealing with those he considered worthy emancipists acquiesced.

The skills John was  acquiring in the Colony coupled with those he had learned as an accountant in England were coming in handy and life was improving steadily for he appears to have been able to use some of the Government Land at the dairy for his own cattle. Ann  too was proving to be a marvellous help and mother and on Wed 3rd July 1811 gave birth to their third son PETER. This was ANN’s 4th child but John’s 16th, two of his English children had died before he left England leaving 5 sons and 5 daughters there.

During March 1812 there were again heavy rains and the Hawkesbury rose 12 feet over its banks. Flood years seemed to stir John’s spirit for on 7th December he further petitioned the Governor , this time for a free pardon which was granted. (NSW COL SEC IN LETTERS Petitions mitigating sentences 1811 – 1812 pp 110-111 reels 1227 and 612 ) (register of pardons and tickets of leave Vol 1 p 183 Col Sec papers COD ML ).

As cattle were always straying through the burial grounds  behind St Johns Church Parramatta, an appeal for funds towards enclosing the grounds was made, to which JOHN CURTIS subscribed ( Sydney Gazette Jan 1813).

On Tuesday 16 August 1814 in a ceremony at St Johns Church at Parramatta witnessed by Chistopher Grogan and Margaret Neale , JOHN CURTIS and ANN MORAN were married. This ceremony was followed by the baptism of 3 year old PETER and his baby sister CATHERINE ( Kitty) born on 7th June that year ( 1814) . A muster taken at this time lists JOHN, ANN and these 2 children as still being supplied from Govt Stores whilst the other 3 children were not.

The CURTIS children grew as the years passed with all helping out on the farm as they became able . Elizabeth blossomed into a young woman and JOHN READY  who lived nearby became interested in  her.  In 1829 when ELIZABETH was 17 and JOHN READY was 30 they were married.

With other ROMAN CATHOLIC members of the community, JOHN CURTIS signed a petition to J T  BIGGE for a ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPEL when Bigges came out to the Colony to investigate and report on how it was going. ( 20 Feb 1820 Bigges Report app p 3943).

Because of John’s advanced age,( he was now 72), ANN CURTIS set up business for herself. On 21 April 1821 she paid into the POLICE FUND for 6 months brewing licence and a retailing licence ( Wenworth Papers dip 228).

Almost six months later on Wed 12 September 1821 , John Curtis died and was laid to rest in the BURIAL GROUND behind ST JOHNS CHURCH PARRAMATTA.

  

 

 

 

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm 

Mary-Anne Warner’s site transcribing STATE RECORDS of SHIPS. easy to navigate. Detailed.

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS

ANNE MORAN AND THE HERCULES IN 1801

Bell's Weekly Messenger (London, England), Sunday, January 4, 1801; Issue 245.

FROM BELL’S WEEKLY MESSENGER LONDON ENGLAND SUNDAY JAN 4 1801 ISSUE 245

_____________________________________________________

ACK WITH THANKS (from PHIL READY’S READY OR NOT )

ANN MORAN.

Ann had been tried in Meath,Ireland, during the the Spring of 1800. Found guilty, sentenced to seven years transportation to New South Wales, she too was held in custody to await a ship. On Sunday the 28th November 1801, two vessels , Hercules with Ann aboard  and Atlas , sailed from the Port Of Cork. The Hercules , a two deck square masted vessel of three hundred and ninety five tons burthen, built in Newcastle England was armed with ten guns , carried a crew of between 32 and 35 men , 140 male and 25 female prisoners and several passengers- among them Major Johnston who was alter to figure prominently in the history of the Colony. the ship also carried a detachment of the New South Wales Corps, under captain Ralph Wilson. ( pro reel 413 wo 12/9901 folio160 ML)

On Tuesday 29th December in the vicinity of Cape Verdes, there was a mutiny aboard ship and thirteen of the convicts were either killed during the mutiny or afterwards died from their wounds. One was later shot by Captain Betts. ( PRO 10 p 260)

At Rio after a disagreement with Captain Brookes who commanded the ATLAS Thomas Jamieson , the acting Surgeon General, with his wife and five children transferred to the HERCULES which arrived in Sydney Town on  Saturday 26th. June 1802. Thirty convicts beside the mutineers died on the journey and forty three were sick.  On landing Captain Lukyn Betts gave his report of the mutiny. He was later charged with killing the mutineer after he had surrendered and was fined several hundred pounds. Five seamen charged with assisting the mutineers were acquitted.

 

ANNE MORAN : http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne%27s-heritage-web-site

Individual    Relationship   
ANN MORAN    ANN MORAN is the home person   
ELIZABETH CURTIS    ELIZABETH CURTIS is a daughter of ANN MORAN   
JOHN CURTIS    JOHN CURTIS is the husband of ANN MORAN   
PETER MARK READY    PETER MARK READY is a grandson of ANN MORAN   
THOMAS HOGAN    THOMAS HOGAN is a son-in-law of ANN MORAN (the husband of her daughter)   
JOHN READY    JOHN READY is a son-in-law of ANN MORAN (the husband of her daughter)   
THOMAS CURTIS    THOMAS CURTIS is a step-son of ANN MORAN   
WILLIAM CURTIS    WILLIAM CURTIS is a step-son of ANN MORAN   
BENJAMIN CURTIS    BENJAMIN CURTIS is a step-son of ANN MORAN   
JOHN CURTIS    JOHN CURTIS is a step-son of ANN MORAN   
FRANCIS CURTIS    FRANCIS CURTIS is a step-son of ANN MORAN   
WILLIAM CURTIS    WILLIAM CURTIS is a step-son of ANN MORAN   
JOSHUA CURTIS    JOSHUA CURTIS is a step-son of ANN MORAN   
ANN CURTIS    ANN CURTIS is a step-daughter of ANN MORAN   
SARAH CURTIS    SARAH CURTIS is a step-daughter of ANN MORAN   
ELIZABETH CURTIS    ELIZABETH CURTIS is a step-daughter of ANN MORAN   
CHARLOTTE CURTIS    CHARLOTTE CURTIS is a step-daughter of ANN MORAN   
CURTIS    CURTIS is a direct descendant of the husband of ANN MORAN   
JANE PURRIER    JANE PURRIER married the same man as ANN MORAN   
PETER ( GEORGE) READY    PETER ( GEORGE) READY is a great-grandson of ANN MORAN   
SARAH ANN BENSON    SARAH ANN BENSON is the wife of a grandson of ANN MORAN   
READY    READY is an in-law of ANN MORAN   
JOHANNAH CAVANAGH    JOHANNAH CAVANAGH is an in-law of ANN MORAN   
JESSIE SARAH READY    JESSIE SARAH READY is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (4 generations; great-great-granddaughter)   
JULIA JACKSON    JULIA JACKSON is the wife of a great-grandson of ANN MORAN   
THOMAS BENSON    THOMAS BENSON is an in-law of a daughter of ANN MORAN   
HANNAH HUTCHINS    HANNAH HUTCHINS is an in-law of a daughter of ANN MORAN   
GEORGE MOORE JNR    GEORGE MOORE JNR is the husband of the wife of a grandson of ANN MORAN   
FRANCIS PRENDERGAST    FRANCIS PRENDERGAST is the husband of an in-law of ANN MORAN   
JACK BELL    JACK BELL is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)   
JEAN BELL    JEAN BELL is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)   
BETTY BELL    BETTY BELL is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)   
JOYCE BELL    JOYCE BELL is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)   
WILLIAM ALLEN BELL    WILLIAM ALLEN BELL is the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
WILLIAM BELU JACKSON    WILLIAM BELU JACKSON is the father-in-law of a great-grandson of ANN MORAN   
ELIZABETH JOHNSON    ELIZABETH JOHNSON is the mother-in-law of a great-grandson of ANN MORAN   
WILLIAM JACKSON    WILLIAM JACKSON is a brother-in-law of a great-grandson of ANN MORAN   
SARAH A JACKSON    SARAH A JACKSON is a sister-in-law of a great-grandson of ANN MORAN   
JACKSON    JACKSON is a sister-in-law of a great-grandson of ANN MORAN   
HENRY SAMUELS    HENRY SAMUELS is the step-father of the wife of a grandson of ANN MORAN   

NITA SAVAGE    NITA SAVAGE is the wife of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
   
SUSAN SANDERS    SUSAN SANDERS is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (6 generations; great-great-
LYNNE SANDERS    LYNNE SANDERS is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (6 generations; great-great-great-great-granddaughter)   
BRUCE SANDERS    BRUCE SANDERS is the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
ALFRED ROY BURTON    ALFRED ROY BURTON is the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
WILLIAM DUIST CARTER    WILLIAM DUIST CARTER is the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
JOHN BELL    JOHN BELL is the father-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
MARY ANN MCNEIL    MARY ANN MCNEIL is the mother-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
ROY MCNEIL BELL    ROY MCNEIL BELL is a brother-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
LESLIE  D.R. BELL    LESLIE  D.R. BELL is a brother-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
JAMES A BELL    JAMES A BELL is a brother-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
NORMAN BELL    NORMAN BELL is a brother-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
MARY HENRIETTA BELL    MARY HENRIETTA BELL is a sister-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
WILHELMINA ELIZABETH BELL    WILHELMINA ELIZABETH BELL is a sister-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
JANET BELL    JANET BELL is a sister-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
ANNE MCLEOD BELL    ANNE MCLEOD BELL is a sister-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
 
JIM ROBERT BRAITHWAITE    JIM ROBERT BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (7 generations; great-great-great-great-great-grandson)   
BENJAMIN POMROY    BENJAMIN POMROY is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (7 generations; great-great-great-great-great-grandson)   
JOSEFINE DEWBERRY    JOSEFINE DEWBERRY is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (7 generations; great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter)   
CASSANDRA POMROY    CASSANDRA POMROY is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (7 generations; great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter)   
KATI BRAITHWAITE    KATI BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (7 generations; great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter)   
 
MARK POMROY    MARK POMROY is the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
PETER KNOX    PETER KNOX is the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
JOHN GEORGE SANDERS    JOHN GEORGE SANDERS is the father-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
ELIZABETH CRAIG    ELIZABETH CRAIG is the mother-in-law of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
JAMES BELL    JAMES BELL is a grandfather of the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
WILHELMINA MCLEOD    WILHELMINA MCLEOD is a grandmother of the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
NORMAN BELL    NORMAN BELL is an uncle of the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
GARY BELL    GARY BELL is a nephew of the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
ELAINE JOY BELL    ELAINE JOY BELL is a niece of the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
MARGARET SWAN    MARGARET SWAN is a sister-in-law of the husband of a direct descendant of ANN MORAN   
  
MADELINE POPPY BRAITHWAITE    MADELINE POPPY BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of ANN MORAN (8 generations; great-great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter)   

 

A STORY OF FUGITIVES IN 1803 ON LETTERS IN SAND

http://electronicquill.wordpress.com/2008/09/10/in-this-year-1803-fugitives/