Category Archives: JACKSON

JANET MACKAY AND WILHELMINA MCLEOD ON THE WAVERLEY

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(CHECK DATES AND NAMES: INFORMATION FROM TWEED HISTORICAL SOCIETY;

JAMES BELL ,28, from Gallowsgate , Glasgow , Scotland transported for housebreaking. Tried in Glasgow. 7 years. Arrived on the YORK on 7-2-1831. Assigned to Paterson River. Certificate of freedom – 9.8.1838

WILHELMINA MCLEOD emigrated from Sutherland Shire Scotland, with her mother JANET MACKAY , two sisters and a brother on the JAMES MORGAN arriving Sydney 11-2-1839. The family moved to the Hunter.

James and  Wilhelmina married on 29-9-1840  at the Scots Church Paterson.)

The only records I have so far found are as below but its later than February. Best visit BB again and set my thinking straight. In the meantime;

 

JAMES MORGAN MASTER

SHIP Waverley (1) ARRIVED NSW 17.6.1839

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549022

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 14 May 1839, page 2.

The Mellish sailed from the Downs on
the 17th January, with a cargo of mer-
chandise for this port. Her agents are
Messrs. Hughes and Hosking.

The Whitby cleared outwards on the
12th January, and the Waverley on the
16th in ballast ; both for Sydney. In

all probability they bring either emigrants

or convicts.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2551381

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 18 June 1839, page 3. News

The Whitby, Captain Melbank, sailed
from Dublin, with female prisoners,
bound to Sydney, four days previous to
the Waverley.

The Waverley spoke the Lady Bute,

from Greenock, bound to South Aus
tialia and Sydney, with merchandise and
passengers, on the 3d May, in lat. 38 °
45′ S., long. 25 50′ E.-all well ; and,
on the 4th May, spoke the Ann Watson,
from Bristol, bound to Launceston and

Sydney, with merchandise and passen-
gers-all well.

SYDNEY GAZETTE.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2551380

TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 1839.

English Intelligence.

By the Waverley, with male convicts
from Ireland, we have received London
papers to the 18th February, inclusive.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549645

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 20 June 1839, page 2

The Waverley and Indemnity are advertised for freight or charter.

 

EXPORTS.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549648

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 20 June 1839, page 2.

THE WAVERLEY.-Among the convicts
arrived by the Waverley is Carrick, the
Roman Catholic Monk, whose trial and
conviction on a charge of torturing a
child to death created a strong excitement
in Ireland some eight or nine months

since. The Roman Catholics not being
quite so powerful at head quarters as they
were in the time of Sir Richard Bourke,
when another special who shall be name-
less, was brought to Sydney and allowed
to go at large, we presume Carrick will
be forwarded to Port Macquarie forth-
with, or sent to vegetate on Cockatoo

Island.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2546850

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 25 June 1839, page 2

The CONVICT BARRACKS.-On Satur-
day last His Excellency the Governor
visited the Prisoners’ Barracks, Hyde
Park, for the purpose of inspecting the
convicts who arrived by the Waverley.
The names of the men were called over,

and they were ranged round His Excel-
lency in a circle, when he explained to
them the situation in which they were
placed in regard to the term of probation
they were required to serve before being
assigned to private service, and the
rewards held out to them, by indulgences,
for good behaviour.

 

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2537911

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 23 July 1839, page 3.

Vessels cleared from the 13th to the 20th instant

inclusive

July 13-WAVERLEY, 436 tons, Morgan,

master, for India, in ballast.

 

  • Richard GILBERT, 22, Soldier, b. SAL, T: from Dublin 22/02/1839 to Sydney NSW17/06/1839, Ship: Waverley 1.

 

 

 

     

  • Guide to Using the ARK – Musters & Other Papers
  • Waverley (1) 1839 p.1

    Receipts for prisoners etc; and Chief Justice’s Warrants for Military prisoners

     

  • I am including this snippet due to the Bell name being linked with a WAVERLEY trip South. Wilhelmina Mcleod married James Bell. 
  • WINDUSS family – Tasmania and Victoria, Australia

John WINDUSS was born in December 1809 at Otterburn, Yorkshire, England and married Mary BELL. John belonged to the 96th Regiment and arrived in Hobart on 21st September 1841 on the ship “Waverley” with wife Mary.
As with the TEVELEIN family I have found most WINDUSS names in Tasmania and Victoria are connected to John and Mary and there are also WINDUSS descendants of John and Mary in Western Australia and New Zealand.
http://www.flexi.net.au/~rkbt/more_research.html

____________________________________________________________

While I’m at this one – research to date indicates that WILLIAM and ELIZABETH JACKSON came on WILLIAM BROWN SCHOONER in 1853. Looking at records I find that the BEEJAPORE ( see also CRAIGS AND HURRELLS) which arrived in 1853, brought a number of JACKSONS and was clearly an emigrant ship which the WILLIAM BROWN was not.

Note to self. FOLLOW THROUGH ON THESE RECORDS. NSW STATE ARCHIVES

JACKSON
Elizabeth
32
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Elizabeth
dv
1
and family
Beejapore
1853
2464

JACKSON
Elizabeth
5
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
William
7
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Marianne
10
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

ACKSON
Mary
bv
inft
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Susan
30
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Susan
3
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Thomas
bv
inft
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Robert
32
and family
Beejapore

JACKSON
James
39
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
James
12
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
James
9
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
George T
2
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Henry
32
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________

QUIRKS ON THE VICTORIA 1849. WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS ARRIVED AS ASSISTED EMIGRANTS ON VICTORIA 1849

http://www.baker1865.com/quirk.htm

Peter Quirke (1798-1863)- arrived on board the Ship Neptune in 1854

  • Arrived with wife Mary and five children in 1854.
  • Farm labourer, the son of James QUIRKE and Alice QUIRKE née REID, was born at St Johnswell ,Kilkenny Ireland in 1798.

  • He married Catherine RYAN in Kilkenny, Ireland circa 1823. The marriage producing four children.

    • James  QUIRK (c. 1824-dec.),

    • Nicholas (c. 1825-c. 1835), Arrived in NSW on board the Ship Victoria in 1849, he married Mary McMahon

    • Margaret QUIRK (c. 1828-1915),  – Arrived in NSW on board the Ship Victoria in 1849,  she Married George Fell in 1855 and died at Waverley in 1915.

    • Michael Quirk (c1832)

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JAMES MORGAN AND WILLIAM BROWN

5ships_30588_md

SHIPS AT SEA ( NOT OUR SHIPS. JUST SHIPS )

ozmariners@ozlists.com ozmariners@ozlists.com

_________________________________________________________

WILHELMINA MCLEOD AND SIBLINGS WITH THEIR MOTHER JANET MACKAY IN 1839 and THE JACKSONS ON THE WILLIAM B BROWN IN 1853.

I stumbled across a classified advertisement in an 1839 Gazette for the ship WAVERLEY. I had been looking for the JAMES MORGAN on which I had been told that Wilhelmina and family travelled . It appears now that JAMES MORGAN is the Master’s name and the ship on which they immigrated is the WAVERLEY.

THE WAVERLEY seems also to be carrying Irish convicts so I shall begin looking. The Mcleods and Mackays are registered as from the SUTHERLAND SHIRE of SCOTLAND and coming as immigrants.

Finding that curly one caused me to wonder about the WILLIAM BROWN. I thought that might also have been the Master’s name rather than that of the ship. In fact it is the name of the Schooner and of the owner who, as you will see below, also becomes Master.

 

gse_multipart39203

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly.

 

MARY ANNE WARNER provides this detailed site. I just found the WILLIAM B BROWN on it. The schooner on which the JACKSONS came free in 1853. Mary Anne has a gracious way of dealing with things which I envy and a knack of saying thanks to her helpers which I lack. Great Site.

 

AND FROM NLA. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article667247  The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 21 May 1853, page 2. News

The William Barry Brown, schooner, left
Honolulu 17th February, and called at Strong’s
Island. The crew of the Paragon, whaler of

Nantucket, Captain Nelson, were there, that
vessel having been wrecked on the outer reef on
the 20th March ; she had been out 27 months,
with 400 barrels, and part of the crew came on

to Sydney in the schooner. On account of some
misunderstanding existing between Captain
White, who commanded the William Barry
Brown,on her leaving Honolulu, and Mr. Brown

the owner, Captain While was left at Strong’s
Island.

 

globe_sm

 

_________________________________________________________

KERSWELL COAT OF ARMS COURTESY MIKE AND SHORT KERSWELL FAMILY HISTORY.

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-family-crest-coat-arms.html

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-coat-of-arms.html

 

LOOK FOR SUSANNAH KERSWELL

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne’s-heritage-web-site

IMMIGRATION IN THE NLA NEWSPAPERS

Known Immigrants in the family at this time are :

YEAR SHIP PERSON/S FROM TO
1839 JAMES MORGAN JANET MACKAY AND CHILDREN INC WILHELMINA MCLEOD SUTHERLAND SHIRE SCOTLAND SYDNEY
1849 VICTORIA WILLIAM  SANDERS AND MARY ANN SKIVINGS (MARRIED COUPLE) DEVON ENGLAND SYDNEY
1853 WILLIAM BROWN JACKSONS   SYDNEY
1853 BEEJAPORE THOMAS CRAIG , PARENTS AND SIBLINGS   SYDNEY
1853 BEEJAPORE HURRELLS   SYDNEY

ARTICLES ON EMIGRATION/IMMIGRATION IN NLA NEWSPAPERS:

 
 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640683

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640671

 
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640576

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE TAKEN BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION. MAY l8, 1835

The Superintendent having left the ship before her arrival in Port Jackson, there was latterly no control whatever over the women, and some of them who had been
allowed to land, immediately after the ship came to anchor, were picked up quite drunk in the streets of Sydney, on the evening of their arrival.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639961

The Perth Gazette and… Saturday 10 June 1837, page 918

SYDNEY. IMMIGRATION COMMITTEE. (From the Sydney “Colonist . “

This committee report came out the year before Mary Ann and William Sanders  came on the VICTORIA.

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639961

 

  • The Government, however, have latterly proposed a measure for the encouragement and promotion of emigration which, if the settlers were at all alive to their own interests and disposed to cooperate in securing them, would be tantamount to the adoption of our original recommendation. For, at a cost for agency which would be altogether insignificant for each individual or family brought out to the colony, the respectable colonists might have seemed through the Government measure we allude to, the immediate introduction of two or three thousand families of virtuous and industrious emigrants of the classes chiefly required in the colony.

 

 
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639883

LAND AND IMMIGRATION COMPANY.

An experiment has been tried in New South Wales to increase the number of immigrants by the formation of a Land and Immigration Company. The shares to be raised were 5,000, one half to be disposed of in the colony, and the other half to be reserved for capitalists in England. As we are also in need of an augmentation of our numbers, the hint may not be unprofitably applied ;

 

Archives Investigator  
State Records Authority of New South Wales

 IMMIGRATION – The Bounty System


 

Extracted from the:- “Concise Guide to State Archives of New South Wales

Shipping & Passenger Records
Ballarat & District Genealogical Society Inc

 

 

LIST OF SHIPPING SITES AND EMIGRATIONS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639883

The McLeods and Mackays perhaps from the Sutherland Shire !

3rd. In Scotland, and the north of Ireland, where no such contribution could be looked for, but where the lower classes, being more intelligent, industrious and frugal, would be better fitted for roughing it in a new colony, virtuous and industrious families of these classes would willingly bind themselves to pay that amount from the first of their savings after their arrival ; and if in the event of their purchasing land on credit from the Company, this debt were to be chargeable on the land, its repayment would be secured.

 

http://www.angelfire.com/ns/bkeddy/HIES/1.html
_________________________________________________
Highland and Island Emigration Society, HIES
_____________________________________
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article642443

In fact, the obstructions, the suspense, and the jobbing of the present system, tend to destroy, the property, if not work the absolute ruin €of the poorer class of immigrants. An individual of this description on his arrival is forced to leave his family in Sydney, whilst he proceeds to explore the north, the south, or the westward, for a suitable location

 

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm 

Mary-Anne Warner’s site transcribing STATE RECORDS of SHIPS. easy to navigate. Detailed.

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS

‘IT WAS HARD TO DIE FRAE HAME’:

 

Several branches of the families came as assisted emigrants. Wilhelmina McLeod and her mother Janet Mackay with 3 siblings arrived in 1839 on the James Morgan from the Sutherland Shire  of Scotland. The Sanders ( William and Mary Ann) came by the VICTORIA in 1849. In 1853, The Jacksons arrived in the WILLIAM BROWN but I don’t yet know under what conditions they came. Also in 1853 the BEEJAPORE sailed to NSW and NZ and on board were John and Harriet Hurrell ( who died in the same year 1853. Many died on that ship and Harriet’s death may well be as a result of the voyage. ) Also on board were the Scottish CRAIGS. The extract below is from a NZ thesis on death and mourning amongst the Scots who emigrated .

 

IT WAS HARD TO DIE FRAE HAME’:

DEATH, GRIEF AND MOURNING

AMONG SCOTTISH MIGRANTS

TO NEW ZEALAND,

1840 -1890

By

Debra Powell

A Thesis

Submitted to the University of Waikato

in fulfilment of the

requirements for the degree of

Master of Arts

in History

Official aggregates from ships surgeons’ reports reinforce the impression of

diaries that

“few immigrant ships arrived in New Zealand waters with their

original complement of passengers. Infectious diseases, chronic illness,

accidents at sea, dysentery and diarrhoea, and the debilitating effects of constant

seasickness on pregnant women and breast-feeding mothers, all took a toll on

passenger numbers. Migrants were not unaware of the risks involved. The loss

of babies and infants was considered an inevitable consequence of long seaboard

journeys. William Usherwood on board the Beejapore to Sydney in 1853

expressed a common sentiment when he wrote: ‘The … adults are all in good

health, we have lost several children but this was quite expected, being always

the case’”

William Usherwood, cited in Robin Haines, Doctors at Sea: Emigrant Voyages to Colonial

Australia (Hampshire and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), p. 2

_______________________________________

By the mid-nineteenth century there was a plethora of emigration societies set

up to assist Scots to find new homes abroad. In 1839, for example, a society was

formed among the weaving community of Fenwick in Ayrshire. The society

oversaw a ‘constant flow’ of departures to immigrant destinations including

Australia and New Zealand. Its constitution reflected a sense of impending crisis

and was unequivocal in its expression of the conviction that ‘ordinary folk’

should have the means to improvement, and an escape from the prospect of

unemployment, pauperism and starvation. It states:

A fearful gloom is fast thickening over the horizon of our country. Every

prospect of comfort to the working man is daily becoming darker and

more dreary. Trade and manufacturers are rapidly leaving our shores and,

to all appearance, a crisis is at hand in which the sufferings of the working

class will form a prominent feature

Cited in Jim Hewitson, Far off in Sunlit Places: Stories of the Scots in Australia and New

Zealand (Edinburgh: Canongate Books, 1998), p. 19

_________________________________________________

FROM DEBRA POWELL’S THESIS

“The ocean voyage between Scotland and New Zealand could take anywhere

from three to five months. These months represented a transitional period for

individuals and families, and acted as a liminal zone between the old life and the

new. Migrants’ experiences of death at sea were an important part of this

transition, as traditional ideas and practices were challenged by the exigencies of

sea burials. Of necessity, the time between death and disposal of the body was

 

 

I have elected to include the diaries of English as well as Scottish migrants to New Zealand and

Australia, both for what they reveal about perceptions of ‘Scottishness’, and because of the

obvious commonalities in both experiences and responses to death at sea.

short. In the case of stillborn infants, and when infectious diseases were aboard,

this may have been as little as one hour.

 

The complex traditions of waking and

kisting which had served to facilitate the mourning process among Scots in their

home communities had to be dispensed with in the cramped space aboard ship.

Moreover, many adult patients spent their last days quarantined in the ship’s

‘hospital’ being cared for by a matron and the ship’s surgeon rather than their

own kin, as they would have been at home. This removal from the dying process

often left families with little to comfort them through the difficult process of

mourning. There were several modes of reaction to the disruption of the grief

process through death at sea. Aside from the negation of traditionally held

customs and observances, sea burial provided the family with no fixed place of

interment, effectively denying them the comfort of future visits to the graveside.

Furthermore, the body of the deceased could never lie in the family grave sites

that were to become a feature of colonial graveyards in New Zealand, as they

were in Britain and Ireland. On a religious or superstitious level, many migrants

still held onto fears concerning resurrection. People witnessed the bodies of the

deceased dropped into water teeming with sea-life, protected by nothing but a

weighted canvas shroud. Residual beliefs concerning the resurrection of the

body and its dependence on corporeal integrity at death, meant that the fear of

burial at sea resonated with that of dissection in many minds”

 

Beejapore

‘IT WAS HARD TO DIE FRAE HAME’:

EMIGRATION IN THE 1850s

Ancestors Known to have arrived as EMIGRANTS are

YEAR

SHIP EMIGRANTS
1839 JAMES MORGAN WILHEMINA MCLEOD WITH HER MOTHER JANET MACKAY AND HER SIBLINGS
1849 VICTORIA WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS
1853 WILLIAM BROWN WILLIAM JACKSON AND ELIZABETH JOHNSON (HIS WIFE) WITH ONE DAUGHTER.
1853 BEEJAPORE THOMAS CRAIG WITH HIS PARENTS AND SIBLINGS

 

 

The Sanders are marked on their disembarkation papers as “assisted emigrants”. The 19th century newspapers fill in a good deal of my lack of understanding of emigration in the 19th century. I have images of William Sanders and of Mary Ann Skivings Sanders but none of the other ” emigrants”.

MARY ANN SKIVINGS SANDERS MEN BLACKBERRY , FRED J, FRED W , ESSEL REECE

Mary Ann Skivings Sanders and the elderly gentleman seated is BlackBerry Bill Sanders:

NSW STATE ARCHIVES REEL 58.

ASSISTED IMMIGRANTS INWARDS TO SYDNEY PER SHIP ” VICTORIA” ARRIVED 2nd SEPT 1849.

SAUNDERS, William. 26 years. Butcher. Born Kenton Devonshire. Son of William and Elizabeth SAUNDERS- still living in Kenton. C of E  – reads and writes. No relations living in Colony. in good health. Complained of short issue of rations during early part of voyage.

SAUNDERS, Mary Ann. 19 years – farm servant – born Silverton Devonshire – daughter of George and Grace Skivings. Still living in Silverton. C of E – Reads and Writes – no relations living in Colony – in Good health.

The Researcher (whom I think may have been Dick Sanders) has added – ( SAUNDERS should read SANDERS )

THE JACKSONS. from READY OR NOT – compiled by PHIL READY.

On 17th May 1853 a sixty ton ketch, WILLIAM BROWN, had arrived in Sydney from Honolulu. Aboard were immigrants WILLIAM JACKSON and his wife ELIZABETH and one daughter. William who had been born in Nottinghamshire in England was a Coppersmith by trade. On 26th November 1849 , in London he had married EIZABETH JOHNSON who had been born in Norfolk England.

In 1853 William whose trade was very much in demand set up in business in Steven Street, Ultimo. The following year his address appeared in SANDS directory as BAY STREET GLEBE. Julia from whom I descend  was born on 5th June 1860 – listed as Newtown.

THE OTHER 2 FAMILIES OF EMIGRANTS SO FAR TRACKED ARE :

  • WILHELMINA MCLEOD who came from SUTHERLAND SHIRE with her mother and siblings : JANET MACKAY.
  • THOMAS CRAIG a lad of 8 and his family.

 

DAILY NEWS OCTOBER 7th 1850 LONDON ENGLAND

 

 

Daily News (London, England), Monday, October 7, 1850; Issue 1363

 

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