Category Archives: GLASGOW

CONNECTIONS FROM MURWILLUMBAH AND THE TWEED – BELLS, BIGNELLS, LAURIES AND MORE

NORMAN BELL was the older brother of JOHN BELL wife of MARY ANN MCNEIL. They had adjoining land at CONDONG on the TWEED.

Their parents were JAMES AND WILHELMINA as noted elsewhere. James was the housebreaker transported from Glasgow in 1831 on the YORK and WILHELMINA was the daughter of WILLIAM MCLEOD and JANET MACKAY who came on the JAMES MORAN in 1839. They married in 1839 at MAITLAND when WILHELMINA was 17 years old. Check in the search engine to the right for further details. It appears at this time that the Mcleods and Mackays came as a result of the ruthless clearances of the Sutherland Shires in the HIGHLANDS of Scotland. In the 1860s the BELL boys have land on the TWEED. The NSW BDM records indicate that their father JAMES died in 1859( to be verified). I do not know what brought the boys ( and perhaps more members of their family north from the Maitland Area). Land is also indicated to belong to WILHELLMINA BELL – mother ? sister ? daughter ?

NORMAN BELL was born 1845 and died 15 June 1924 . He is buried in BARRINGTON CEMETERY. His occupations are listed at TWEED RIVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY as farmer/grazier. Whilst on Tweed he was resident at CONDONG. Norman married in 1870 at DUNGOG NSW. His wife was AGNES FRASER HIGGINS and her mother was JANET LAURIE. As my mother used to tell me the BELLS and the LAURIES were ‘tied in somehow”. Her father was JOHN HIGGINS. Agnes Higgins was born at Pt Stephens in 1846 and died in CHATSWOOD, SYDNEY in 1929.

Their children;

names birthdate and place marriage date and spouse death date and place
JANET LAURIE 1871 TWEED RIVER 1898 GEORGE BIGNELL MURWILLUMBAH  
WILLIMINA A 1872 TWEED RIVER JOHN A. GUNN COPELAND 1895 1911 STROUD NSW
JAMES WALTER 1874 PORT STEPHENS   15-8-1886 NSW
AGNES MARY 1876 PORT STEPHENS GORDON A D CLARK STROUD 1915  
ELIZABETH J 1878 PORT STEPHENS JOHN STACE PORT STEPHENS 1903
MARGARET CHRISTINA 1881 BARRINGTON THOMAS FARLEY CRICK SYDNEY 1907  
MARY HENRIETTA 1883 COPELAND WILLIAM JAMES MARTIN STROUD 1907 22-8-1938 KRAMBACH NSW
JOHN JAMES 1889 COPELAND   1923 BARRINGTON
NOREINE F 1893 COPELAND    

From these dates it appears Norman left the Tweed district by the early 1870s whereas John’s Children are born on Tweed between 1879 and 1890 with the youngest being born at Laurieton in the early 90s. Hmm. A rethink required again.

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THE INFORMATION I HAVE IS THAT NO 49 IS JOHN BELL’S LAND . ( YET TO BE VERIFIED AS ONE MAP INDICATES CONDONG AND ONE IS FURTHER ALONG NEAR STOTTS CREEK)

 

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GEORGE  BIGNELL. IN 1898 AT MURWILLUMBAH MARRIED JANET LAURIE BELL DAUGHTER OF NORMAN BELL WHO WAS BROTHER OF JOHN BELL, GRANNY’S HUSBAND.  http://www.aif.adfa.edu.au:8080/showPerson?pid=22518

 

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FROM THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1368785

There is mention of a MR BELL managing the ABBOTSFORD SUGAR MILL on the TWEED.

 

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MURWILLUMBAH LINKS

http://www.mit.edu/~dfm/genealogy/sercombe.html Sercombe Families

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GALLOWGATE GLASGOW IN THE 1830s

vkgc_misc100

HOMETOWN OF JAMES BELL. TRIED THERE FOR HOUSEBREAKING IN 1830 AND TRANSPORTED ON THE YORK ARRIVING IN NSW IN FEB 1831.

GLASGOW MAILS Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, March 19, 1832; Issue 17262.

CALEDONIAN MERCURY MONDAY MARCH 19 1832

GALLOWGATE2he Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, September 10, 1831; Issue 8172.

NEWCASTLE COURANT SATURDAY SEP 10 1831

YORK SAILS2 Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, October 4, 1830; Issue 1617.

HAMPSHIRE TELEGRAPH AND SUSSEX CHRONICLE MONDAY OCT 4 1830

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THE YORK 1831

(NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH THE HULK YORK IN ENGLAND)

Convict Ship arrivals – 1831http://www.historyaustralia.org.au/twconvic/tiki-print.php?page=1831

 

SHIP           MASTER        SURGEON               DEPARTED   ARRIVED    MALE CONVICTS FEMALE CONVICTS

York 1831  Leary, Dan.  France, Campbell  Sheerness     Sydney       200                      0

 

(http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/shipNSW2.html
Vessel              Arrived    Port    Sailed      From     Days   Embarked   Sydney    Hobart  Norfolk I    Master               Surgeon
                                                                               M    F    M    F    M    F    M    F
York I (2)         07 02 1831  NSW   04 09 1830  Sheerness   156   200        198                          Dan Leary              Campbell France

 

York I (2) transported only 8 male Irish convicts http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/ships.htm

 

Feb. 8.-YORK (ship), 478 tons, Leary master, from London, Campbell & Co. agents; 198 male prisoners and government stores.)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199042

 

CONVICTS ON BOARD:

CARLISLE James York 1831

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198935

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 8 February 1831, page 2.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1931.

Monday Evening.

The York has brought English news to the last week in September. We have now before us London papers to the 27th of that month, and the first intelligence we have to announce is of a most painful nature, being the sudden DEATH OF MR. HUSKISSON

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198936

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 8 February 1831, page 2. News

Shipping Intelligence

ARRIVALS.

From New Zealand, on Sunday last, the schooner Currency Lass, with 80 tons flax.

From Newcastle, same day, the cutter Fairy.

From London, yesterday, whence she sailed the 4th of September, and from Portsmouth the 29th, the ship York (429 tons), Captain Leary, with 200 male prisoners, 2 having died on the passage. Surgeon Superintendent, Campbell France, Esq. The guard consists of 40 non-commissioned officers and privates of the 17th Regiment, who are accompanied by 4 women and 2 children. Passengers, Colonel Despard, 17th Regt., Mrs. Despard and 3 children, Ensign Owen, and Ann Forster and C. Donohoe, servants to Mrs. Despard.

REMAINING IN THE HARBOUR.

SHIPS.- Louisa, Forth, Nancy, Royal Admiral, Clarkstone, Sir George Murray, Dryade, Denmark Hill, Mary Ann, Andromeda, Burrell, Janet hat, Vittoria, Elizabeth, Albion, Resource, and York.

BRIGs.-Elizabeth, Wellington, Norval, Couvier Thistle, Governor Phillip, and Lord Rodney.

SCHOONERS- Henry, Resolution, Admiral Gifford, Schnapper, Darling, New Zealander, and Currency Lass.

CUTTERS-Emma, Fairy, and Letitia Bingham.
Total.-Ships, 17 ; Brigs, 7 ; Schooners, 7 ;  Cutter, 3 ; in all, 34.

 

NEWS OF THE YORK 1831

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198965 The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 10 February 1831, page 2.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198968

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 10 February 1831, page 2.

We are requested to correct a mistake which occurred in the notice of the arrival of the ship York (Captain Leary) in our last number. The burthen of the York is there stated to be 429 tons, instead of 478 tons, as appears by the register, -which we bave seen. This vessel is not the old York, as some persons, we are informed, suppose.; but was built, in the year 1819, at Southwick, in Durham. Captain Leary, the commander, is an old and much respected visitant to this colony.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199140

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 19 February 1831, page 2.

The male prisoners by the York were landed yesterday morning. Among them are a considerable number of strong healthy labourers accustomed to agriculture, who will doubtless prove no small acquisition to the settlers who may obtain them. There are also several good mechanics and tradesmen.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199405

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 5 March 1831, page 2

The second division of the 57th regiment, will embark on board the York, for Madras, next Thursday.

The following is the ‘ Return ‘ of a detachment of the 57th Regiment, to embark

on board the ship York, on Saturday next,

for Madras :

Major R. Hunt, Captain J. Brown, lady,
and family ; Lieut. G. Edwards, Lieut. R.
Alexander, Lieut. E. Lockyer, Paymaster
G. H. Green, lady, and family ; 9 Serjeants,
J 2 drummers, 7 corporals, 132′ privates,

15 women, and 39 children.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199723

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 24 March 1831, page 2.

Attempt at Robbery.-A seaman
belonging to the ship York, having just come ashore
on Saturday evening with ten dollars in his pocket,
was stopped by two fellows opposite the Dock-yard,
who knocked him down, ond then commenced ful-
filling their intentions on his pockets. Jack how-

ever was not disposed to strike, although boarded on
both sides, and defended himself manfully, till Dowd,
with some other constables, came to his assistance,
on whose approach the villains decamped with all
possible expedition, leaving the tar in possession of
all his shot, and cursing them for a couple of lub

belly rascals.

 

YORK 2 article2199895-3-001

DON’T MISS THIS STORY READ ON : http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199895  The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 5 April 1831, page 2.

AND THEN THE POSTCRIPT;

[ POSTSCRIPT, 9 o’CIock, P. M.

_____________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199991

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 9 April 1831, page 2. News

RETURN OF THE YORK,

We have to announce the gratifying
news of the safe return to port of the ship
York, together with the equally pleasing
intelligence that the apprehensions for

the safety of the crew, which a chain of
circumstances occasioned in the public
mind, turn out to be altogether ground
less. She anchored yesterday evening
about dusk, in Watson’s Bay, the passen
gers and crew all well. From the hasty
particulars which we have been enabled
to glean, it appears that her parting from
the Edward was occasioned by a strong
northerly wind, which induced Captain
Leary to alter his course, and endeavour
to make the passage through Bass’ Straits
When the ship was hailed by Captain
Gilbert, from the Edward, the wind was
so high, that nothing more than a con.
fused sound could be distinguished on

board, and, being unable to lay-to, she
proceeded on her course : the wind
subsequently veered to the southward
and, after beating about the straits for
several days, Captain Leary thought it
most advisable to return to Sydney. We
are most happy at being thus enabled
satisfactorily to allay the ferment which
a rumour so astounding in all the alleged
circumstances which gave rise to it, was
calculated to excite, not only in this Co.
lony, but in every part of the British
dominions to which it might reach.

 

FURTHER TO THE POSTCRIPT

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200039

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 12 April 1831, page 2.

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, LAST.

RETURN OF THE YORK.

We had the heartfelt satisfaction of
announcing in our last, in a hasty Post-
script, the safe return to port of the ship
York, which was supposed, from Captain
Gilbert’s strange story, to have been
piratically seized by the troops she was

conveying to Madras. We must now
give some explanation on the other side,
as derived from the very best authority.

On Sunday, the 27th ult., Captain
Leary, of the York, dined with Captain
Gilbert on board the Edward, and re-
turned to his own ship in the evening,
after arranging for the signals to be made
during that night. This was the last per-
sonal intercourse they had. The wind

was then N. E.

On Monday, the 28th, no communica-
tions took place, “and the wind continued
steady from the N. E.

On Tuesday, the 29th (the memorable
day on which Captain Gilbert supposed
the York to be captured), about 3 o’clock
in the afternoon, Captain Leary, find-
ing the wind so unchangeably contrary,
began to think seriously of putting

ONCE AGAIN. READ ON THIS IS A GRAND STORY.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200039

 

AND THEN THE YORK RETURNS TO SYDNEY AGAIN

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200161

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 19 April 1831, page 2

RETURN OF THE YORK AGAIN!

OUR good friend the York, has visited
us yet once again, having this time en-
countered dangers of no imaginary or
trifling order. She put back on Sunday,
with her rigging a good deal damaged.
The tremendous hurricane of Saturday

night and Sunday morning, was enough
to have foundered the stoutest ship that
ever floated, and when we remember that
it was from the south-east, and how near
the York was to an iron-bound lee-shore,
we may judge how imminent was her
danger, and how providential her escape.
But of this our readers will form a more
adequate conception by the subjoined
extract of a letter from one of the pas-
sengers, written to his friend in Sydney,
immediately after anchoring in Watson’s
Bay.

” You must be a little surprised to “find us
here again : the fears entertained for our
safety on the former occasion were more
sensibly felt by ourselves on this. We
sailed yesterday morning, with a fine wind
from the S.W., the weather looking very
dark and unsettled. About ten o’clock it
changed all round the compass, and at last
settled in the South-East, and increased to
a gale, accompanied with the most awful
thunder, lightning, and the heaviest rain I
ever witnessed, which continued the whole
of the day, and the sea ran to an immense
height. Our fore-top-sail-yard was carried
away-I rather think struck by lightning
the top-sail and two or three other sails

blown to ribbands : two of our boats stove
in. About two o’clock in the morning Cap-
tain Leary came to me, and said it was
necessary to have an additional number of
hands on deck-not that there was any im-
minent danger, but that we were on a lee
shove, and the ship having lost her head
sails, consequently was not easily worked
off. Every assistance was of course af-
forded ; and I am happy to have it in my
power to state to you that no men could

behave better, notwithstanding they had
not a dry shirt to their backs for 24 hour.
As far as my own opinion goes, I feel con-
vinced that his own crew would never have
been able to save the ship from going on
shore, as we were close to the land to the
southward of the Light-house, and the sea
running mountains high. However, thank
divine Providence, we got in as soon as day-
light would permit him to approach the
entrance to the Heads. I am happy to state
how grateful we all feel for Captain Leary’s
zeal and exertions; he never quitted the
deck the whole time; and but for his
thorough knowledge and experience as a
seaman, I really believe we should not have
survived to tell the tale. Our miseries did
not end here ; we bumped two or three
times on the bank at the Sow-and-Pigs.
I hope the ship has not suffered any mate-
rial injury, but it will be as well to have that
ascertained before we make another trial.”

We once more congratulate these brave
troops on their safety, hoping that after
all these untoward events, they will en-
joy a quick and pleasant passage to the
place of destination.

 

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 26 April 1831, page 3 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200267 The York is immediately to be hove down, in order to her undergoing a thorough repair, previously to proceeding to sea once more. She cannot, therefore, leave this spot before the expiration of a month at least. The troops disembarked yesterday morning, and marched hack to their old quarters, looking like any thing but pirates, poor fellows !

 

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 28 April 1831, page 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200302 The detachment of the 57th Regiment, which disembarked from the York on Monday, proceeded to Parramatta, and not to their old quarters,” as we erroneously stated on Tuesday. ‘

 

AND TO FINISH IT OFF FOR THE YORK IN 1831, THE EDITOR OF THE GAZEETE PERHAPS COULD HAVE BEEN A LITTLRE MORE COMPASSIONATE TO THE POET ON THE YORK.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200162

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 19 April 1831, page 2.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

We thank H. H. for his ‘Dream’, which will be

published in a day or two.

The lines written on board the York are not well measured.

J’s ‘ Lines written during the Thunder-storm on

Saturday last, will probably appear in our next.

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SITES TO SEE RE THE YORK:

http://www.jenwilletts.com/Convict%20Ships.htm CONVICT SHIPS JEN WILLETTS

 

Convicts http://www.coraweb.com.au/convict.htm

 

Prison Hulk Records usually giving the names of convicts http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-PT-JACKSON-CONVICTS/2008-07/1215427845

 

CONVICTS TO AUSTRALIA http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/stories.html

 

Ballarat & District Genealogical Society –
Advice for Locating Convict Information  http://www.ballaratgenealogy.org.au/convicts.htm

 

http://www.geocities.com/pennytrueman/chstrans.html 

Joseph IKIN, 35, b. CHS, M, Ploughs, Reaps, Milks, Sows; T: 1831 from Sheerness to Sydney NSW, Ship: York.

John TAYLOR, 23, b. CHS, S, Wheelwright, T: 1831 from Sheerness to Sydney NSW, Ship: York.

 

EVENTS OF 1831 http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1831.htm

 

 

The People’s Health

By Milton James Lewis

 

 

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RANDOM SITES

RE SANDERS:

The Last Farewell

Devon Convicts Transported to Australia 1782 – 1821

 http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/DevonIndexes/LastFarewell.html

 

DEVON

http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/index.html

“A county of England, reaching from the Bristol to the English Channel, and bounded by Cornwall, and Somersetshire, and Dorsetshire. It is 69 miles in length, and 60 in breadth, and is divided into 31 hundreds. It is very hilly, and abounds in huge granite rocks, some of whose peaks are above 1500 feet in height. The highland is covered with wide moors, of which Dartmoor is the most extensive. But in the valleys and lower ground the soil is fertile. Its rivers are the Exe, the Culm, the Dart, the Tamar, the Otter, &c. Some parts of its coasts are composed of lofty cliffs, but at others there is a beautiful sandy shore. The air and climate are so mild and salubrious that invalids often retire to its sea-ports for the winter. Limestone, granite, some building-stone, and a species of wood-coal are found here, as well as some kinds of variegated marble. It produces corn, &c. and fruit trees, especially apples, whence much cider is made. Its fisheries also are of value. Exeter is its chief city. Population, 533, 460. It sends 22 members to parliament.” (From Barclay’s Complete and Universal English Dictionary, 1842.)

HISTORICAL TIMELINE

Compiled by Anne Mavric  http://home.vicnet.net.au/~pioneers/pppg10.htm