Category Archives: EMIGRATION

SITES TO SEE : NEW SOUTH WALES

NEW SOUTH WALES

THE ONLINE BOOKS PAGE.

EMIGRANTS FROM THE FAMILY :

YEAR
SHIP
NAME

1838
BRILLIANT
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL

1839
JAMES MORAN
MCLEODS AND MACKAYS

1849
VICTORIA
WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS

1853
WILLIAM BROWN
JACKSONS

1853
BEEJAPORE
CRAIGS AND HURRELLS

FOR SOME BACKGROUND ATMOSPHERE OF THIS PERIOD , try this one from Google Books:

Notes and sketches of New South Wales: during a residence in that colony

A RESIDENCE IN THAT COLONY FROM 1839 TO 1844.

By Mrs. Charles Meredith

CONTENTS.

Preface \ -i

CHAPTER I.

Embarkation — Indisposition—Pleasures of a Sea Voyage—Fellow-pas-

sengers—Observance of Character—Devonshire Coast—Pilots—Land

Luxuries—H.M.S. Hercules—Eddystone Lighthouse—Last Land . 1

CHAPTER II.

Bay of Biscay—Spanish Coast—Employment the best preventive of.

Ennui—Phosphorescence of the Sea—Portuguese Men-of-war—Swal-

lows— Tenerifie — Speaking the Cherub — Fear of Pirates—Por-

poises—Flying Fish—Capture of a Boneto—Dolphins . 7

Chapter in.

Calm in the Tropics—Sharks — Turtle — lanthina—Shovel-board—

" Crossing the Line "—Loss of the North Star—Southern Constellations

—Moonlight in the Tropics—Sunsets—Waterspouts—"Sun-dogs" . ’16

CHAPTER IV.

Whales and " Jets d’eau"—Birds—Boatswain—Boobies—Cape Pigeon—

Mischief of Idleness—" Mr.Winkles" at Sea—Great Albatross—Nelly

—Stormy Petrel—Blue Petrel—Sailors’ Delicacies—Stormy Weather 23

CHAPTER V.

Island of St. Paul’s—Islands in Bass’s Straits—Mutton-birds—Botany

Bay Heads—General excitement—Heads of Port Jackson—Scenery—

New Zealanders—First sight of Sydney—Pull ashore—Comforts of

Land Life—George Street, Sydney—The Domain—Eucalyptus, &c.

—Wooloomooloo—Government Gardens 31
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VI.

Sydney Market—Fish, &c.—Dust, Flies, Mosquitoes—Drive to the

Lighthouse — Flowers — Parrots—Black Cockatoos—Hyde Park—

Churches — Libraries — " Currency " Population — Houses — Balls,

&c. —Inns—Colonial Newspapers Page 43

CHAPTER VII.

Leave Sydney—" Clearings"—Huts of the Working Classes — Chain-

Gangs — Parramatta — Creeks and Rivers —Inn — Birds — Road to

Penrith—Grasshoppers—Penrith—Nepean—Emu Plains—Ascent of

the Blue Mountains—Waratah 56

CHAPTER VIII.

A "Country Inn"—Breakfast—Contrasts—A Bush Ramble and Digres-

sion about Ants—Mountain Scenery—Cattle Skeletons—"Weather-

board" Inn—Supper and Night at " Bliud Paddy’s"—Mountains, and

the Surveyor’s Roads—Mount Victoria—Convict Gangs and Bush-

rangers—Inn at the " Rivulet," and its Inhabitants—The Ruling Vice 66

CHAPTER IX.

" Hassan’s Walls"—Grass Trees—Mount Lambey—Victoria Inn—Speci-

men of Benevolent Politeness—Colonial Bridges—First View of

Bathurst—The " Settlement"—Dearth—Climate—Hot Winds—Pro-

cessions of Whirlwinds—Hurricanes . . . . . .79

CHAPTER X.

».

Bathurst Society and Hospitality—" White Rock"—Native Dance and

Ceremony—Kangaroo Dance—Appearance of Natives—Children—

" Gins "—Their marriage, slavery, and sufferings—Family Dinner-

party—Adopted Children—Infanticide—Religion — " Devil-Devil"—

Language—Story of Hougong and Jimmy—" Ay, ay ?"—Duties of

the Toilet—Native Songs—Mimicry—Fondness for English Dress—

Boundary Laws—Legal Parricide—Habitual Treachery . .90

CHAPTER XI.

Native Huts—" Gunyon"—Natives’ ingenuity in Duck-Snaring and

Fishing—Native Weapons—Green Frogs—Freshwater Shells—Platy-

pus — Spur-winged Plover—Australian Harebell — Convolvulus —

Everlastings—Peppermint Tree—Opossums—Natives’ mode of taking

His
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XII. ,

Native Turkeys—Their mode of Incubation—Native Cranberry—Our

Return — Locusts — Manna — Transformations — Ground Grubs —

Night at the Rivulet—New flowers—Heat and Dust—" Weather-

board" Inn—Walk to the Cascade—Fringed Violet—Waratahs—

Fine View—Lories Page 114

CHAPTER XIII.

Storm and fine view on Lapstone Hill—Farm-house in the " public" line

—Arrive at Parramatta — Steamboat — Scenery on the " River "—

Sydney Christmas Tree—Christmas Day—Tippling Servants . 124

CHAPTER XIV.

Homebush—Colonial Country-houses—The " Avenue"—Gates—Slip-

rails — Bushrangers — Mounted Police — Dingoes — Flying Fox —

Flying Opossum—Native Cats—Birds—Robins—Swallows— Knife-

grinder—Coachman—Bell-bird—Laughing Jackass—Larks—Game 129

CHAPTER XV.

Norfolk Island Pine—English Pear-tree—Daisy — Bush Flowers—

Creepers—He-oak—Zamia—" Wooden Pear-tree"—Native Cherry—

Insect Architecture—Twig-nests, &c.—Butterflies—Ground Spiders—

Tarantula—Silk Spiders—Scorpions—Hornets—Mosquitoes—Ants . 139

CHAPTER XVI.

Guanas—Lizards—Snakes—Salt Marshes—Fishing—Crabs—Toad-fish

—Mangrove-trees—Romance and reality—Night sounds — Orange-

Groves—Gardens—Gigantic Lily—Scarcity of fresh water—Winter

Rains—Salt Well — Climate in Winter—Society — Conversation—

Servants—Domestic matters—Embarkation for Van Diemen’s Land 150

N.B. OUR EMIGRANTS WOULD NOT HAVE HAD THE SAME ADVANTAGES AS MRS MEREDITH .

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COLONIAL MOTHERS

THE SAG Newsletter reports that Dr Tanya Evans, now of Macquarie University, is engaged in researching the history of motherhood in early Colonial Australia and Britain between 1750 and 1850. The focus has caught my fancy. My Mind seems to have taken a disproportionate amount of time in recovering from the Change of year and the Summer Season and I haven’t been able to get my mental historical  hard drive functioning at all but this little article has begun to bring the ghosts back to life again. Dr Evans is asking for assistance from any who have worked extensively on their family histories and have details of mothers from these early times. Dept of Modern History at Macquarie University, Sydney would have the contact details for you.

As for me, it has me thinking of all the Mothers of Mine who and the folkore I have been given. The Scottish Widow who was asked to be Laird of the Clan but came out here with her children instead.  Johannah Ready Prendergast, whose son John was sent as a convict to Government House at Windsor where his mother was Housekeeper. I wonder often about Johannah who was 47 when convicted in Ireland. She tried to have another son and his family sent out but failed. When John’s marriage failed and he became excessively odd in his behaviour and was sentenced to Moreton Bay, Johannah disappears from the records. I like to think she followed him.

Ann Moran and Hannah Hutchings/Hitchens. What was it like for them to be mothers here in the early 19th Century ? Young convict women. Ann had 5 children to John Curtis who was already husband and father to a family in England and had attempted to have them brought to him.  Hannah was recorded as a ‘ loose woman’ on the convict ship THE BROTHERS. How did her life as a mother develop from that starting point and from the death of her first husband in the Lunatic Asylum, Liverpool ?

TRIAL BAY AND SOUTH WEST ROCKS

trial bay

TRIAL BAY WAS built in a later period than what I’m usually looking at. The connection with South West Rocks was earlier for my direct family. I do however have documents and images from Jan Maurice and Sanders’ were out there as Boatsmen and running a boarding house as well as one lad being remembered in the Memorial Pines. Killed in the war. So we took a drive out there on our recent 2 week Loop and took a look through the Boatsmen’s Houses which are carefully maintained and where,as usual, we encountered enthusiastic and helpful volunteers hanging on to our heritage with Tenacity. Below are some links to TRIAL BAY and some images from our exploration.

TRIAL BAY GAOL

Established in 1886, Trial Bay Gaol is the only example of a state prison specifically built to carry out public works. The intention was for prisoners to construct a breakwater in Trial Bay and create a safe harbour between Sydney and Brisbane.

http://www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au/clicka.htm

KEMSPEY AND THE MACLEAY RIVER

 

http://www.australianexplorer.com/photographs/nsw_architecture_trial_bay_gaol.htm

Trial Bay (Gaol) Photos – (New South Wales)

 

http://www.nnsw.com.au/southwestrocks/trialbay.html

TRIAL BAY GAOL Photo Gallery

 

http://migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/places/zivillager/history.shtml

ZIVIL LAGER

 

http://www.collectionsaustralia.net/org/Trial_Bay_Gaol_National_Parks_and_Wildlife/about/

Trial Bay Gaol National Parks and Wildlife : COLLECTIONS AUSTRALIA NETWORK

 

TRIAL BAY IN 2001  
NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 120 NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 117
NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 121 NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 119

 

EMIGRANTS

A Guide to the Emigration Colonies: Including Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, Cape of Good Hope(1851)

Henry Smith Evans

 

 

44691_family_md

emigrants guide 1851
The young emigrants; or, A voyage to Australia. 3 pt. [in 1 vol.]. (1850)
http://www.archive.org/details/youngemigrantso00emiggoog

Gold-mining and Assaying: A Scientific Guide for Australian Emigrants (1852)

John Arthur Phillips

The Colony of Western Australia: A Manual for Emigrants to that Settlement Or Its Dependencies … (1839)

Nathaniel Ogle

1838 A Lecture on South Australia: Including Letters from J. B. Hack, Esq., and Other Emigrants

TRAVELLING THE MID NORTH COAST

PORT TO TAREE 027

TOBERMORY ISLE OF MULL SCOTLAND

JANET MCLEAN

 
Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, May 7, 1838; Issue 18419.

 TOBERMORY 1588Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, May 7, 1838; Issue 18419.

2TOBERMORY 1588Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, May 7, 1838; Issue 18419.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION MATTERS IN THE LATE 1830s.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549499 The Hobart Town Courier Friday 12 January 1838, page 2. News 2380 words

THE NEWSPAPERS FEATURING SOME OF THE ISSUES INVOLVED IN EMIGRATION IN THE 1830s.

EMIGRATION 1838 1 article2550005-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thursday 1 March 1838, page 2 bell_1_md
EM2article2550005-3-002The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thursday 1 March 1838, page 2 bell_1_md
EM3article2550005-3-003The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thursday 1 March 1838, page 2

bell_1_md

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1838, page 3

1 EMIGRATION article2550109-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1838, page 3
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550109

bell_1_md
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thursday 1 February 1838, page 2

DISEASE article2549868-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thursday 1 February 1838, page 2

bell_1_md

Cite: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2541249

  • Immigration.
  • The following circular has been ad-
    dressed, by Mr. Ward Stephens, the
    editor and proprietor of the Sydney
    Herald, to many of the large, landed pro-
  • prietors in the agricultural counties of
    England. It is a matter of very little
    consequence to the Colonists of New
    South Wales, from what particular di-
    vision of the British Empire we receive
    our supplies of Immigrants, provided
    that care is taken in the selection, to
    insure the introduction of such only as
    are of good moral character and indus-
    trious habits.  READ ON
  • BY AN ANGLO AUSTRALIAN
bell_1_md

 

Individual    Relationship    Steps
JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN is the home person    0
JOHN MCNEIL    JOHN MCNEIL is a son of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
ALLAN MCNEIL    ALLAN MCNEIL is a son of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
ALEXANDER(ALICK) MCNEIL    ALEXANDER(ALICK) MCNEIL is a son of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
NEIL MCNEIL    NEIL MCNEIL is a son of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
ELIZA MCNEIL    ELIZA MCNEIL is a daughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
JANET MCNEIL    JANET MCNEIL is a daughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
GRACE MCNEIL    GRACE MCNEIL is a daughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
ELIZABETH SARAH MCNEIL    ELIZABETH SARAH MCNEIL is a daughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
PRISCILLA HARRIET MCNEIL    PRISCILLA HARRIET MCNEIL is a daughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
ANNIE MCNEIL    ANNIE MCNEIL is a daughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
MARY ANN MCNEIL    MARY ANN MCNEIL is a daughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
JOHN MCLEAN    JOHN MCLEAN is the father of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
GRACE MCGUINESS(MCINNES)    GRACE MCGUINESS(MCINNES) is the mother of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
DELAMORE WYNTER    DELAMORE WYNTER is the husband of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
JOHN MCNEIL    JOHN MCNEIL is the husband of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    1
MARY JANE MARTIN    MARY JANE MARTIN is a daughter-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the wife of her son)    2
JANET EASTON    JANET EASTON is a daughter-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the wife of her son)    2
NORMAN BELL    NORMAN BELL is a grandson of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
WILLIAM ALLEN BELL    WILLIAM ALLEN BELL is a grandson of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
JAMES A BELL    JAMES A BELL is a grandson of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
ROY MCNEIL BELL    ROY MCNEIL BELL is a grandson of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
LESLIE  D.R. BELL    LESLIE  D.R. BELL is a grandson of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
JANET BELL    JANET BELL is a granddaughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
WILHELMINA ELIZABETH BELL    WILHELMINA ELIZABETH BELL is a granddaughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
ANNE MCLEOD BELL    ANNE MCLEOD BELL is a granddaughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
MARY HENRIETTA BELL    MARY HENRIETTA BELL is a granddaughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
JOSEPH MOYNA    JOSEPH MOYNA is a son-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the husband of her daughter)    2
JAMES ANDERSON    JAMES ANDERSON is a son-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the husband of her daughter)    2
ALFRED E LAYT    ALFRED E LAYT is a son-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the husband of her daughter)    2
WILLIAM ANDERSON    WILLIAM ANDERSON is a son-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the husband of her daughter)    2
THOMAS FOSTER    THOMAS FOSTER is a son-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the husband of her daughter)    2
WILLIAM JAMES THOMSON    WILLIAM JAMES THOMSON is a son-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the husband of her daughter)    2
JOHN BELL    JOHN BELL is a son-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (the husband of her daughter)    2
JOHN MCLEAN    JOHN MCLEAN is the paternal grandfather of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
MARY MACDONALD    MARY MACDONALD is the paternal grandmother of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
DONALD MCGUINESS(MCINNES)    DONALD MCGUINESS(MCINNES) is the maternal grandfather of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
ALAN MCCALMAN    ALAN MCCALMAN is the maternal grandmother of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
JOHN MCNEIL    JOHN MCNEIL is the father-in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    2
JACK BELL    JACK BELL is a great-grandson of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3
GARY BELL    GARY BELL is a great-grandson of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3
ELAINE JOY BELL    ELAINE JOY BELL is a great-granddaughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3
JOYCE BELL    JOYCE BELL is a great-granddaughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3
BETTY BELL    BETTY BELL is a great-granddaughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3
JEAN BELL    JEAN BELL is a great-granddaughter of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3
JESSIE SARAH READY    JESSIE SARAH READY is the wife of a grandson of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3

JAMES BELL    JAMES BELL is an in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3
WILHELMINA MCLEOD    WILHELMINA MCLEOD is an in-law of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN    3

JUDE    JUDE is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (4 generations; great-great-granddaughter)    4
LYNNE SANDERS    LYNNE SANDERS is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (4 generations; great-great-granddaughter)    4

SUSAN SANDERS    SUSAN SANDERS is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (4 generations; great-great-granddaughter)    4

BENJAMIN POMROY    BENJAMIN POMROY is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
JIM ROBERT BRAITHWAITE    JIM ROBERT BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (5 generations; great-great-great-grandson)    5
KATI BRAITHWAITE    KATI BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
CASSANDRA POMROY    CASSANDRA POMROY is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5
JOSEFINE DEWBERRY    JOSEFINE DEWBERRY is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (5 generations; great-great-great-granddaughter)    5

MADELINE POPPY BRAITHWAITE    MADELINE POPPY BRAITHWAITE is a direct descendant of JESSIE/JENNET/JANET MCLEAN (6 generations; great-great-great-great-granddaughter)    6

IN THIS YEAR : 1838 -JESSIE – JENNET-JANET MCLEAN (later MCNEIL) ON THE BRILLIANT

 

1838
The BRILLIANT brought Scottish Bounty Immigrants including :
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL( later to become known as GRANNY BELL of LAURIETON, wife of the Invalid Mr John Bell. ) Janet was born in 1831 so she was only a child of 6-7 when she came. Her parents were JOHN MCLEAN and GRACE MCINNES(McGuiness)

The John Bells during the 1880s are said to have had a house at Palm Vale on the Tweed and the accident which invalided him. apparently rendering him unable to walk and preceding their removal to LAURIETON, took place in the sugar industry on the Tweed near CONDONG and TUMBULGUM.

Mary Ann married John  in 1878 in Taree.   

44691_family_md

 

immigration article4168774-3-001The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 17 November 1837, page 2 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4168774
The Hobart Town Courier Friday 17 November 1837 Supplement: Supplement to the Hobart Town Courier., page 2.

The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 5 January 1838, page 2
With the BRILLIANT due later in JANUARY.

BUNMORAH article4167785-3-001The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 5 January 1838, page 2

5ships_30588_md

JESSIE – JENNETT – JANET MCLEAN AND THE BRILLIANT 1838

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, October 14, 18372 EMBARKATION BRILLIANT

THIRD AND LAST EMBARKATION OF HIGHLANDERS TO AUSTRALIA FOR THE SEASON
Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, October 14, 1837; Issue 18331.

Ships to Australia 1837-39

From the British Parliamentary Papers of 1839 II – Respecting Emigration to the Colonies

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/au1838.htm

The Brilliant, a sailing ship of 428 tons, left Scotland for the Australian Colonies on September 27, 1837 and carried some 300 Scottish
people who were leaving their homeland under the bounty immigration system.

The selection was made by a selecting officer. 320 people embarked on the BRILLIANT and there was only one death recorded. The BRILLIANT was built in MONTREAL in 1834 and was 429 tons. She was taken up by the EMIGRATION DEPARTMENT on August 19 1837 in LEITH . The emigrants embarked in the HEBRIDES. The name of the owner was S PATERSON and she was hired at the rate of 4pounds 17/6 per ton.  A. Campbell was the Surgeon Superintendent on the voyage. The BRILLIANT departed on the 27 Sep 1837 and arrived in NSW on 27 Jan 1838. 126 days at sea with a touching at the Cape on 29 Nov 1837.
74 males.
84 females.
59 children between 14 and 7.
103 children under 7.
320 in total with 2 children born on the voyage.
The 1 death was that of a child.

"They Came in the Brilliant: A History of the McLaurin, McMee" Author: J. O. Randell

Title: They Came in the Brilliant: A History of the McLaurin, McMeekin and Paton Families
Publisher: Brown Prior Anderson Location: U.S.A.

From Log Of Logs, Vol.2. By Ian Nicholson
Brilliant, ship 428t, Gilkinson; Tobermory, Mull, 27/9 with 318 Highland
1837-1838 immigrants for Sydney.
+ Account of departure published in *Inverness Courier,
reproduced in
*Australian Biography & General Record, No. 15. (Sydney July
1990)

 

 

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-IMMIGRATION-SHIPS/2007-12/1197018234

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/australia1837.htm

 

Watterson Family http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~watterson/wattersonrootsweb.html

McLeod Family of Ulmarra

  • Letters published in Sydney Morning Herald in January 1838 regarding the voyage of the "Brilliant"

NSW State Records film # 1288 SCOTTISH BOUNTY MIGRANTS.

ON THE BRILLIANT 1837-1838

JOHN McGREGOR .

John, Elizabeth and their young family came to Australia in 1838 on the ship "Brilliant" and settled in the Williams River area. They later moved to the Clarence River district where John and Elizabeth resided for the remainder of their lives.

John McGregor died 28th August, 1888 at Ulmarra, NSW, and Elizabeth on 25th August, 1869, also at Ulmarra.

http://www.angelfire.com/bc/juliette/page4.html

MAY HOLS 08 006
ULMARRA 2008

404px-Queen_Victoria,_1838  

Meanwhile  Queen Victoria was being crowned as per following article

When Victoria Was Crowned; DESCRIPTION OF THE CORONATION OF 1838, BY AN EYE-WITNESS OF THE IMPOSING CEREMONIAL.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9F0CEED6103DEE32A25752C1A9639C946397D6CF

FROM THE CEMETERIES SITE OF GREAT LAKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM

http://greatlakeshistorical.museum.com/cemeteries.html
http://greatlakeshistorical.museum.com/krambach.html

Obituary notice.

Donald Cameron.

The death of Mr. Donald Cameron of Port Stephens of which the usual Obituary Notice was inserted in the "Empire" of Friday last deserves a more extended notice than it then and there received.

Mr. Cameron was a native of Ardnamurchan, Argyleshire, Scotland and was upwards of sixty years of age when he emigrated with his family to the colony per ship "Brilliant" which sailed from Tobar Mory in the Isle of Mull in the year 1838, being ninety years of age when he died on the 12th instant. READ ON

JANET/JENNETT MCLEAN ALSO SAILED FROM TOBER MORY IN THE ISLE OF MULL.

tobermory1

TOBER MORY BY JAMES WISEMAN http://www.jameswiseman.com/tobermory.php

OTHER MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT.
Allan McLean and Janet McFarlane

http://jamesobrien.id.au/genealogy/allan-mclean-and-janet-mcfarlane/

Inverness Courier Index 1837, p212

A large body of emigrants sailed from Tobermory on the 27th of September for New South Wales. The vessel was the Brilliant, and its size and splendid fittings were greatly admired. “the people to be conveyed by this vessel are decidedly the most valuable that have ever left the shores of Great Britain; they are all of excellent moral character, and from their knowledge of agriculture, and management of sheep and cattle, must prove a most valuable acquisition to a colony like New South Wales.” The Rev. Mr Macpherson, of Tobermory, preached a farewell sermon before the party sailed. The total number of emigrants was 322, made up as follows:—From Ardnamurchan and Strontian, 105; Coll and Tiree, 104; Mull and lona, 56; Morven, 25; Dunoon, 28; teachers, 2; surgeons, 2. A visitor from New South Wales presented as many of the party as he met with letters of introduction, and expressed himself highly gratified with the prospect of having so valuable an addition to the colony. A Government agent superintended the embarkation.

THERE are a lot of MCLEANS on this BRILLIANT trip of 1838.
Some of them include:

MCLEAN Allan 49
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Wife 40; boat builder

MCLEAN Allan 28
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Wife 20; shepherd

MCLEAN Allan 19
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Anne 18
Brilliant
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Anne 15
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; country servant

 

 

MORE MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT 1838

MCLEAN Archibald 22
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Archibald 16
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Bell 25 Brilliant
24/01/1838
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN Charles 36
Brilliant  24/01/1838 

Wife 35; farm servant

MORE MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT 1838

MCLEAN Donald 28 Brilliant
Wife 30; mason

MCLEAN Donald 30
Brilliant
Wife 28; farm servant

MCLEAN Dugald 30
Unmarried; fam overseer

MCLEAN Ellen 20
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Hugh 23
Unmarried; shepherd

MCLEAN Isabella 20
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN James 16
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Janet 18
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Janet 29
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN John 32
Wife 28; farm servant

MCLEAN John 32
Wife 27; farm servant

MCLEAN Marion 68
Widow; farm housekeeper

MCLEAN Mary 27
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN Roderick 35
Wife 35; farm servant

MCLEAN Roderick 30
Wife 22; farm servant

article2550732-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 27 January 1838

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 27 January 1838

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550732

brilliant article2550113-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1838, page 3
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1838, page 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550113

   

 

article2547105-3-002brilliantbrilliant 

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 3 February 1838, page 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2547105

   

 

EMIGRATION 1848

Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, May 2, 1850

 

 

1848 EMIGRATION Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, May 2, 1850 ass emig The Bristol Mercury (Bristol, England), Saturday, June 24, 1854; Issue 3353.

 

 

EMIGRANTS FROM THE FAMILY :

YEAR SHIP NAME
1838 BRILLIANT JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL
1839 JAMES MORAN MCLEODS AND MACKAYS
1849 VICTORIA WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS
1853 WILLIAM BROWN JACKSONS
1853 BEEJAPORE CRAIGS AND HURRELLS

MCLEOD ON CONDONG PLAINS

So far we have placed John and Normal Bell with their families on the TWEED RIVER. We also have their sister Wilhelmina who married GEORGE DINSEY. There is a MR BELL christian name unknown supervising at ABBOTSFORD MILL( I don’t yet know which mill that was. ) Now a JOHN MCLEOD appears and McLeod is the maiden name of the mother WILHELMINA who came on the JAMES MORAN in 1839. She had other children with her whose names I don’t as yet have.

WANTED to Let, on Clearing Leases, Seven FARMS, of from forty to fifty acres each; fine scrub land; river frontage, Tweed River ¡ eight miles from the Heads. Apply to Mr. JOHN M’LEOD, Condong Plains, Tweed River ; or E. W. S. HAYLEY, Southgate, Clarence River. 2575

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1295006

The Brisbane Courier Friday 30 August 1872, page 1.

This is 3 years after JOHN BELL acquires his land and 6 years before he married MARY ANN MCNEIL.

 

And in 1881;

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article919217

he Brisbane Courier Saturday 30 April 1881, page 5

“Unique” writes from the Tweed River:
” On the evening of Easter Monday the rather monotonous course of life on the Tweed was broken by a ball given by the employes of the C.S.R. Company, and which, under the kind auspices of Mr. and Mrs Isaacs, bids fair to become one of the annual events of the neighbourhood. A range of the barracks had been prepared for the festive occasion, and, although the weather was unpropitious, a goodly array of the votaries of Terpsichore assembled. The room had  been most effectively decorated by the hands of f$air neighbours-wreaths, crowns, and pendants of varied colours relieved tbe sombre green of the foliage with which the walls and roof had been profusely ornamented, and with the brilliancy of the lights and the bright eyes and flowing drapery of the ladies, combined to produce a tout ensemble seldom seen in the neighbourhood. Dancing commenced at 8 o’clock to the enlivening strains of three musicians, and dance succeeded dance in rapid succession till long past the small hours of the morning. At a late hour the party broke up with many expressions of pleasure on the part of the hosts that their guests had been sufficiently enterprising to brave such stormy weather, and of hope that on a future occasion Condong might again be honoured by their presence.

 

 

THE COTTAGE

THE COTTAGE BILAMBIL 2008

James had been born to John and Mary Ann by this time and Norman was born in 1881.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3429862 FROM BRISBANE COURIER THURSDAY MAY 8 . In 1884, Mr T Steel from the CONDONG MILL sent a large series of animals to the QUEENSLAND MUSEUM for nomenaclature.and two of those were included in science and named as follows;

    1. a tree frog resembling in coloration an American  species. Now named HYLA FENESTRATA and
    2. a fish of the GENUS GALAXUS which was to be described as GALAXIAS BREVIANALUS

The ABBOTSFORD MILL I find in the BRISBANE COURIER 5 AUGUST 1882 was erected near the JUNCTION – the village now called TUMBULGUM. This one did not belong to the massive COLONIAL SUGAR REFINING COMPANY to which CONDONG belonged. It belonged to PRINGLE, SHANKY and CO. Small but enterprising beginners.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3412851

 

IN 1886 the schooner CONDONG, of the TWEED RIVER, was carrying logs of beech, cedar and pine into BRISBANE. In the same year a general servant was wanted for the CONDONG MILL at 15s per week.

IN 1889 E DOWLING of Condong won 900 pounds in the  TATTERSALLS MELBOURNE- CUP SWEEPS.

And in 1892, the BELLS went south to LAURIETON. Some of the family remained. Wilhelmina Dinsey for one.

AND FROM TUMBULGUM, where I lived from 2002-2005;

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3701412

The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 12 September 1899,

A correspondent of a New South Wales
top-country paper questions whether the
Hunter district is entitled to the credit of
producing the largest pumpkins. He says :
-” I read an account of prolific pumpkins
in the Hunter. The Hunter may be a won-
derful place for pumpkins, but a neighbour
of mine, at Tumbulgum, lost a sow not long

since. He searched everywhere for several
days without success, and at last came to
the conclusion that she was dead.- But one
day, while riding across his farm, he no-

ticed something peculiar about one of his
pumpkins. He rode over to see, and was
surprised to find his sow. She had eaten
her way into the pumpkin, made a bed, and
had a litter of thirteen young ones all inside
the pumpkin

 

the DEATH OF GEORGE DINSEY http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3963005

CONNECTIONS FROM MURWILLUMBAH AND THE TWEED – BELLS, BIGNELLS, LAURIES AND MORE

NORMAN BELL was the older brother of JOHN BELL wife of MARY ANN MCNEIL. They had adjoining land at CONDONG on the TWEED.

Their parents were JAMES AND WILHELMINA as noted elsewhere. James was the housebreaker transported from Glasgow in 1831 on the YORK and WILHELMINA was the daughter of WILLIAM MCLEOD and JANET MACKAY who came on the JAMES MORAN in 1839. They married in 1839 at MAITLAND when WILHELMINA was 17 years old. Check in the search engine to the right for further details. It appears at this time that the Mcleods and Mackays came as a result of the ruthless clearances of the Sutherland Shires in the HIGHLANDS of Scotland. In the 1860s the BELL boys have land on the TWEED. The NSW BDM records indicate that their father JAMES died in 1859( to be verified). I do not know what brought the boys ( and perhaps more members of their family north from the Maitland Area). Land is also indicated to belong to WILHELLMINA BELL – mother ? sister ? daughter ?

NORMAN BELL was born 1845 and died 15 June 1924 . He is buried in BARRINGTON CEMETERY. His occupations are listed at TWEED RIVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY as farmer/grazier. Whilst on Tweed he was resident at CONDONG. Norman married in 1870 at DUNGOG NSW. His wife was AGNES FRASER HIGGINS and her mother was JANET LAURIE. As my mother used to tell me the BELLS and the LAURIES were ‘tied in somehow”. Her father was JOHN HIGGINS. Agnes Higgins was born at Pt Stephens in 1846 and died in CHATSWOOD, SYDNEY in 1929.

Their children;

names birthdate and place marriage date and spouse death date and place
JANET LAURIE 1871 TWEED RIVER 1898 GEORGE BIGNELL MURWILLUMBAH  
WILLIMINA A 1872 TWEED RIVER JOHN A. GUNN COPELAND 1895 1911 STROUD NSW
JAMES WALTER 1874 PORT STEPHENS   15-8-1886 NSW
AGNES MARY 1876 PORT STEPHENS GORDON A D CLARK STROUD 1915  
ELIZABETH J 1878 PORT STEPHENS JOHN STACE PORT STEPHENS 1903
MARGARET CHRISTINA 1881 BARRINGTON THOMAS FARLEY CRICK SYDNEY 1907  
MARY HENRIETTA 1883 COPELAND WILLIAM JAMES MARTIN STROUD 1907 22-8-1938 KRAMBACH NSW
JOHN JAMES 1889 COPELAND   1923 BARRINGTON
NOREINE F 1893 COPELAND    

From these dates it appears Norman left the Tweed district by the early 1870s whereas John’s Children are born on Tweed between 1879 and 1890 with the youngest being born at Laurieton in the early 90s. Hmm. A rethink required again.

image

image

THE INFORMATION I HAVE IS THAT NO 49 IS JOHN BELL’S LAND . ( YET TO BE VERIFIED AS ONE MAP INDICATES CONDONG AND ONE IS FURTHER ALONG NEAR STOTTS CREEK)

 

_____________________________________________________________

GEORGE  BIGNELL. IN 1898 AT MURWILLUMBAH MARRIED JANET LAURIE BELL DAUGHTER OF NORMAN BELL WHO WAS BROTHER OF JOHN BELL, GRANNY’S HUSBAND.  http://www.aif.adfa.edu.au:8080/showPerson?pid=22518

 

______________________________________________________________

FROM THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1368785

There is mention of a MR BELL managing the ABBOTSFORD SUGAR MILL on the TWEED.

 

_______________________________________________________________

MURWILLUMBAH LINKS

http://www.mit.edu/~dfm/genealogy/sercombe.html Sercombe Families

JAMES MORGAN AND WILLIAM BROWN

5ships_30588_md

SHIPS AT SEA ( NOT OUR SHIPS. JUST SHIPS )

ozmariners@ozlists.com ozmariners@ozlists.com

_________________________________________________________

WILHELMINA MCLEOD AND SIBLINGS WITH THEIR MOTHER JANET MACKAY IN 1839 and THE JACKSONS ON THE WILLIAM B BROWN IN 1853.

I stumbled across a classified advertisement in an 1839 Gazette for the ship WAVERLEY. I had been looking for the JAMES MORGAN on which I had been told that Wilhelmina and family travelled . It appears now that JAMES MORGAN is the Master’s name and the ship on which they immigrated is the WAVERLEY.

THE WAVERLEY seems also to be carrying Irish convicts so I shall begin looking. The Mcleods and Mackays are registered as from the SUTHERLAND SHIRE of SCOTLAND and coming as immigrants.

Finding that curly one caused me to wonder about the WILLIAM BROWN. I thought that might also have been the Master’s name rather than that of the ship. In fact it is the name of the Schooner and of the owner who, as you will see below, also becomes Master.

 

gse_multipart39203

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly.

 

MARY ANNE WARNER provides this detailed site. I just found the WILLIAM B BROWN on it. The schooner on which the JACKSONS came free in 1853. Mary Anne has a gracious way of dealing with things which I envy and a knack of saying thanks to her helpers which I lack. Great Site.

 

AND FROM NLA. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article667247  The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 21 May 1853, page 2. News

The William Barry Brown, schooner, left
Honolulu 17th February, and called at Strong’s
Island. The crew of the Paragon, whaler of

Nantucket, Captain Nelson, were there, that
vessel having been wrecked on the outer reef on
the 20th March ; she had been out 27 months,
with 400 barrels, and part of the crew came on

to Sydney in the schooner. On account of some
misunderstanding existing between Captain
White, who commanded the William Barry
Brown,on her leaving Honolulu, and Mr. Brown

the owner, Captain While was left at Strong’s
Island.

 

globe_sm

 

_________________________________________________________

KERSWELL COAT OF ARMS COURTESY MIKE AND SHORT KERSWELL FAMILY HISTORY.

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-family-crest-coat-arms.html

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-coat-of-arms.html

 

LOOK FOR SUSANNAH KERSWELL

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne’s-heritage-web-site

THE HERALDIC COAT OF ARMS OF THE SAUNDERS OF NORTHANTS

Much as it has troubled me to accept the U in SANDERS, I now do so. All my life it has been a stated ” WE ARE SANDERS NOT SAUNDERS” but by now I have trawled through enough documents and official records including our entry into Australia to widen my scope and include SANDERS and SAUNDERS, bitter though it is to the palate.

That allows me to place on site this wonderful COAT OF ARMS. The SAUNDERS from NORTHANTS. I don’t even know where NORTHANTS is but I LIKE THE 3 ELEPHANTS – TUSKS RAISED.

saunders_1_lg

This coat of arms is from the Electronic Clearing House Florida. http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/searchEverything.php?page=3&term=elephant

THE U IN SANDERS; I do not use the U in present day time but to back my choice to acknowledge it I am putting some of the NSW STATE RECORDS data here for the arrival of William and Mary Ann on the VICTORIA in 1849. There are other SAUNDERS on the ship as well and I do not know where they fit with us if at all. For now here are the SAUNDERS from NSW STATE ARCHIVES.

   SAUNDERS ON THE VICTORIA IN 1849

    SAUNDERS Hannah  18  and sister               Victoria 1849   2136, 2460 ?

    SAUNDERS  Mary Ann 19  and husband       Victoria  1849  2136, 2460

    SAUNDERS   Mary Anne 16  and sister         Victoria  1849  2136, 2460  ?

    SAUNDERS  Robert  20  and brother            Victoria  1849  2136, 2460 ?

    SAUNDERS William 26 and wife                  Victoria 1849  2136, 2460

    SAUNDERS  William  22  and brother            Victoria  1849  2136, 246O ?

 

 

I have been told that William and Mary Ann, on arrival went to THOMAS SA(U)NDERS at Appin or Prospect. He is said to have come on the Matilda in the 3rd Fleet in 1791. Accepting that for now, and whilst I am in the NSW STATE ARCHIVES – could he be the THOMAS mentioned below in Bench of Magistrates cases, 1788-1820.

SAUNDERS
Thomas
20/10/1798
“For not making good some corn entrusted to their care in a boat which was lost”
[SZ766]
COD 76

SAUNDERS
Thomas
29/12/1798
Further to dispute referred to on 20 October 1798
[SZ767]
COD 77
(pages 13-14) see also 20/10/1798 [SZ766], page 126, bundle 5, reel 655, COD 7

corn_19011_md

Index to 1841 Census

SAUNDERS
Thomas
685
Parish Prospect, District Parramatta
[X948]
63
2222

 

  • The fine boy CHRISTOPHER GEORGE SAUNDERS who is shot on the MACLEAY RIVER is quite definitely the brother of Frederick  our GGGrandfather, See Blog entry.

______________________________________

 

 

FATTORINI ISLAND MCLEAY RIVER NSW

WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS arrived in the Colony per VICTORIA on 4-9-1849. Their first child ELIZABETH GRACE was born at Horsely in 1850. Apparently they went to THOMAS SANDERS or his family in this western area of Sydney. They then moved North via the New England and eventually to the MCLEAY RIVER where they made their home. In 1852 HARRIET FRANCES was born at YARRABANDINI as was WILLIAM GEORGE in 1854.  FREDERICK JOHN was born on the MCLEAY RIVER in 1855 and CHARLES HENRY at AUSTRAL EDEN in 1860.

YARRABANDINNI.

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-NSW-SE/1999-06/0928673407

Yarrabandini, Mcleay River, Kempsey, NSW was a station 19,200 acres owned by R. Searle that I have listed in 1865

The next three children were born at FLATTORINI ISLAND in 1861,62 and 64. They were ALFRED SIVERT, ERNEST ALBERT and MARY ANN.

The next 5 children were all born in KINCHELA. WALTER,AGNES,EDRED,SARAH and CHRISTOPHER who was accidentally shot by his brother when he was 9 years old and killed.

FLATTORINI ISLAND has my attention today. Looking through the NLA digitised newspapers – I come across the word FATTORINI and am beginning to consider that the Island may well have derived from that name.

I  have a mention of DR FATTORINI. In 1830 he is mentioned as one of the medical men treating the poor of Sydney at the SYDNEY INFORMARY. Other medicos mentioned are DRS BLAND, MITCHELL, FORSTER AND JEANNERET.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2195705

He is also an Honorary Surgeon with the Benevolent Society. In October 1830, a MR MOWATT was robbed by villains. Amongst the takings by the thieves were bills drawn by DR FATTORINI for considerable sums of money. Two villains were involved in the robbery . One was a short man dressed in a black hat, velveteen jacket and dark trowsers. The other was thin and wore a straw hat. An old straw hat. He had dark skin and ” to the best of Mr Mowatt’s recollection” wore whiskers.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2196392

On the 11th April 1831 – one AUGUSTUS ANTONIO was attended By Dr Fattorini and Dr McTiernan at the TALBOT INN BRICKFIELD-HILL. He had succumbed to deliterious fumes from one of the vats which were were a-brewing and despite attempts to resuscitate  , life was declared extinct.

I still have no connection between the Island in the River McLeay where the Sanders children were born and the Good Doctor – but I find him an interesting character.

In August 1832, Dr FATTORINI was coming into Sydney from Liverpool, in company with JOSHUA JOHN MOORE Esq. They were travelling on top of the coach when they saw a crowd of people gathered. There was EDWARD KENNEDY in custody of some constables. Straightaways, Dr F recognised the the greatcoat Kennedy wore as being the Doctor’s very own which had been stolen from his servant. Mr Moore joined in. THAT’S THE MAN THAT ROBBED ME – said he. Mr and Mrs Moore had been vigorously robbed of a good many things only a few days before whilst on the road.

Edward Kennedy, however, had witnesses, two of them, to say that he was with them and intoxicated ( a not uncommon condition of the times apparently). The witnesses did a less than effective job of convincing anyone of their veracity and Mr Kennedy was in deep trouble along with his perjuring mates.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208002

In October 1832, the Doctor purchases a farm near the Orphan School At Parramatta. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208970

The transaction ends up in the SUPREME COURT with disputes over the bills and deposit. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2209304

March 1833 sees DR FATTORINI back in the SUPREME COURT in SYDNEY. The case is FATTORINI vs UNDERWOOD.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2211052

Mr Underwood had refused to pay the Doctor for 90 visits he had made. The Judge does mention that Dr F does not appear to be a graduate of any Universities and is a mere surgeon. He does in the end win his case to the amount of 150 pounds.

In 1834 , he applied for 2 lots of over 600 acres each at Brisbane Water, Northumberland Shire. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2215174

The land was bounded on the South by Bean’s land , on the North by the section line and on the east by a line to include the quantity. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2215587

Still no indication of his having land as far north as the McLeay.

In March 1834 , 3 horses were impounded from the ESTATE OF DR FATTORINI. If they were not claimed by the 24th , Walter Schutt the Poundkeeper was going to sell them. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2215738

5 JULY 1834 SYDNEY GAZETTE http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2216550

Notwithstanding the late improvements made in the streets of Sydney, there is still great room for further amendment. From the recant rains, parts of Kent and Sussex streets, especially that portion of the former which lies between King and Market streets have become nearly ‘impassable, and several accidents to carriage and foot passengers have been the consequence. Dr. Fattorini a few days since was in great danger of being thrown out of his chaise from this circumstance, while making the tour of his professional visits in that quarter ; we trust therefore that no time will be lost in correcting this evil, of which the inhabitants residing in that neighbourhood loudly complain.

JAMES HAMAGE a servant in Dr F’s employ was brought before the court as a runaway. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2196957 Jan 1835. Sydney Gazette.

In the same month another assigned servant who ran away was apprehended . http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2197017

Thursday 5 February 1835 . DR FATTORINI HAS REMOVED TO NO 75 PITT-STREET.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2197251

This left the elegant verandah cottage he had previously occupied, available for rental. It was in Castlereagh=street – at a rental of 86 pounds per annum. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2197406

STILL NO CONNECTION TO THE MCLEAY. WE WILL RETURN TO THE GOOD DOCTOR AT A LATER DATE.

DR FATTORINI’S ASSIGNED SERVANTS ( In brackets after the name is the ship on which the convict arrived . If a number follows it indicates the 1st, 2nd , 3rd etc voyage of that ship to the Colony. )

The first listing is a DR FATTORINI in Sydney in the SYDNEY GAZETTE of July 1832. He had been assigned a labourer GEORGE POTTER (Guildford 8).
DR FATTORINI is also assigned a tinman and brazier by the name of GEORGE COLLINS ( ROYAL GEORGE). DR FATTORINI is still in Sydney in August 1832.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208207
In September 1832, JAMES GORDON (EXMOUTH) was assigned to Dr F as GROOM. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208724
SAMUEL ASHMAN ( LADY HAREWOOD) was assigned to Dr F as a brickmaker. Dr F is listed as SYDNEY. 1832
SAMUEL PARKER (CAMDEN 2) assigned as bricklayer. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2211546 APRIL 1833
A carrier to Dr F. JULY 1833 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2212740
To Dr F a blacksmith http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2215740

 

 

FOR MORE 19th CENTURY AUSTRALIAN INFO :  http://melindakendall.wordpress.com/

FOR BRITISH GENEALOGY: http://www.british-genealogy.com/forums/index.php

 

 

SOME MORE SANDERS STORY FROM JAN AND BARRY MAURICE

1. WILLIAM SANDERS m SARAH STARK c 1768 probably at Tifford outside KENTON near EXETER DEVON.

2. Their son  WILLIAM was baptised on 11/11/1792 at Tifford and was probably born the same day or the day before according to the custom of the time. He later married ELIZABETH GREEN. Their son :

3. WILLIAM was born at KENTON on 15/4/1823. He married MARY ANN SKIVINGS who was born in 1830. Mary’s parents were both born at KILLERTON ( also known as Broad Clyst) near EXETER, Devon.  Her mother, GRACE, was born in 1804. William and Mary  arrived in Sydney on board the VICTORIA on 2/9/1849, Mary possibly pregnant with their first ( surviving ) child.

They settled in the MACLEAY DISTRICT. Oral history has it that William was invited to come to Australia by a retired British Army Colonel to be employed as an expert ploughman having become known as such back in Devon. William is also reputed to have introduced blackberries to the North Coast. This act of folly earned him the nickname ” BLACKBERRY BILL”. William was also a champion rower and rowed in the Kempsey Regatta of 1856. William died on 19/12/1910 aged 87. Mary died on 13/11/1882 aged 52, the mother of 13 children.

Husband    WILLIAM SANDERS   

Birth    Apr. 15, 1823    KENTON DEVON ENGLAND   
Marriage    Aug. 28, 1848    EXETER ENGLAND   
Death    Dec. 19, 1910    FREDERICKTON KEMPSEY   
Burial        FREDERICKTON   
Other Wives       
Parents    WILLIAM SANDERS and ELIZABETH GREEN

Wife    MARY ANN SKIVINGS   

Birth    About 1830    SILVERTON DEVON ENGLAND   
Death    Nov. 13, 1882    FREDRICKTON KEMPSEY NSW AUSTRALIA   
Burial        FREDERICKTON CEMETERY   
Other Husbands       
Parents    GEORGE S SKIVINGS and GRACE 

Children  

1    ELIZABETH GRACE SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Oct. 28, 1850    HORSLEY NSW   
Husband    EDRED EVERSON   
Marriage    Aug. 3, 1868    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Jan. 30, 1904    KINCHELA NSW   
Burial    

2    HARRIET FRANCES SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jun. 4, 1852    YARRABANDINI NSW   
Husband    THOMAS ROWE   
Marriage    Dec. 6, 1869    KINCHELA NSW   
Death    Oct. 13, 1942    DUNGOG   
Burial        

3    WILLIAM GEORGE SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Feb. 11, 1854    YARRABANDINI NSW   
Wife    ELIZABETH HURELL   
Marriage    Jul. 30, 1879    KINCHELA NSW   
Death    Aug. 10, 1923    SOUTH WEST ROCKS NSW AUSTRALIA   
Burial    

4    FREDERICK JOHN SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Oct. 18, 1855    MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Wife    LUCY JANE HURRELL   
Marriage    Apr. 11, 1878    KINCHELA   
Death    Jan. 23, 1921    MARRICKVILLE SYDNEY AUSTRALIA   
Burial   

5    CHARLES HENRY SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jan. 1, 1860    AUSTRAL EDEN   
Wife    MARY ANN PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Aug. 17, 1881    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Jul. 16, 1926    MACKSVILLE   
Burial    

6    ALFRED SIVERT SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jan. 4, 1861    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Wife    EMILY JANE MINCHEN   
Marriage    Apr. 29, 1886    SMITHTOWN   
Death    1933    KEMPSEY   
Burial  

7    ERNEST ALBERT SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Dec. 21, 1862    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Wife    ANNIE JANE PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Jun. 9, 1886    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Nov. 20, 1911    UPPER UNKYA   
Burial    

8   MARY ANN SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Nov. 17, 1864    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Husband    JOSEPH ISAAC HARRIS   
Marriage    Jun. 7, 1885    AUSTRAL EDEN   
Death    Dec. 4, 1941    BRISBANE   
Burial  

9    WALTER THOMAS SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Mar. 18, 1867    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife    ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Jul. 10, 1895    KEMPSEY   
Death    Jan. 24, 1922    KEMPSEY   
Burial    

10    AGNES JANE SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jul. 9, 1869    KINCHELA CREEK MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Husband    CHARLES HENRY WILLIAM  TAYLOR   
Marriage    Nov. 25, 1891    ST LEONARDS   
Death    Aug. 6, 1951    QUEENSLAND   
Burial        LUTWYCHE CEMETERY BRISBANE  

11    EDRED JAMES SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Oct. 2, 1870    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife    ANNIE EDITH NELSON   
Marriage    Dec. 25, 1912    WEST KEMPSEY NSW AUSTRALIA   
Death    Mar. 26, 1938    KEMPSEY   
Burial    

12   SARAH ELLEN SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jan. 27, 1872    KINCHELA CREEK   
Husband    ROBERT EVAN KITCHING   
Marriage    Oct. 26, 1895    SYDNEY AUSTRALIA   
Death    Feb. 9, 1946    CAMPBELLTOWN   
Burial 

13    CHRISTOPHER GEORGE SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jul. 3, 1873    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife       
Marriage           
Death    Jan. 3, 1882    KINCHELA CREEK   
Burial       

 

   

 

      

 

      

         

   

 

the SANDERS COME TO KEMPSEY

Jan Maurice descends from AGNES JANE TAYLOR. The parents of Agnes were WILLIAM SANDERS and MARY JANE SKIMMINGS ( Elsewhere recorded as MARY ANN SKIVINGS Name on birth certificate ). Agnes was born the 10th child on 9th July 1869 in Kinchela NSW.

From papers received from JAN and BARRY.

AGNES JANE TAYLOR

AGNES JANE SANDERS

WILLIAM, her father, was an expert ploughman and was brought out to the Colony from DEVON UK for his skills. While in Kinchela he had a keen interest  in rowing and was a champion oarsman who rowed in the Kempsey Regatta 1856 and entered many races. He was also known as Blackberry Bill as he spread the seeds around the Kempsey District.

The youngest brother of Agnes, CHRISTOPHER, was accidentally shot by his brother’s rifle  on 3 January, 1882, when he was 9 years old. Mary  Jane was a midwife in the district.

William died 19 December 1910 age 87 years and Mary died 13 November 1882 aged 52 years.

When Agnes was 22 she was living in “BROMPTON” Anson St Surry Hills. She was a domestic servant married in St Thomas Church of England Willoughby NSW , November 25th 1891 to Charles William Henry ( Bill) Taylor whose address was Appin , the Minister Stephen H Childe.

After the wedding they went to live in Appin on Elladale farm. Brooks Point Road, Appin. Every Saturday, she would drive the horse and sulky to Campbelltown so that their youngest son Barrington Walter could have piano lessons by Miss Vernon, then on Saturday nights he’d play for the local dance when still a teenager taking over from Bessie Dwyer. Their eldest son, William Harold joined the Army in 1916 as a 17 year old and served overseas, marrying Margaret ( Maggie) Yates when he was 21 years in Lancashire England.

Lionel ( Jack) stayed on the farm. Two girls married and moved to Queensland to live another daughter, Ellen, Mrs Gridley.

On the 9th April at 64 years Bill died and was buried in St Marks Cemetery, Appin. No headstone.

When Barrington married Phyllis Abbott in 23 December 1935, Agnes went to the wedding at St John’s Parramatta and the reception at the CAROLLIAN. Her address was Appin.

In her later years, Agnes came to live in Campbelltown with Lionel and his wife in 28 Chamberlain St Campbelltown. her younger sister Sarah with husband Robert Kitchings also lived in Campbelltown and when sarah died 15 February 1946, Agnes Jane was the last of William and Mary’s family alive. She was in her 80s but still did beautiful  crocheting and knitting. Agnes died in Queensland  8th August 1951. Buried in Lutwyche Cemetery.

 

 

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne%27s-heritage-web-site

 

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS

SANDERS MISCELLANEOUSLY IN THE 1850s IN THE NLA NEWS

SANDERS ARE HERE.

1850 – THE SHIP, THE ROMAN EMPEROR , ARRIVES FROM THE DOWNS AND PLYMOUTH AND ON BOARD IS MR GEORGE SANDERS AS A PASSENGER. MOST LIKELY NOT ONE OF OURS. WE TEND TO ARRIVE ASSISTED IN ONE WAY OR ANOTHER AND NOT LISTED AS MR OR MRS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article697056

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 16 January 1850, page 2.

1850  – A MR SANDERS SAILS INTO SYDNEY  AS PASSENGER FROM PORT PHILLIP ON THE FRANCIS RIDLEY.
THERE IS ALSO A CAPTAIN SAUNDERS IN THIS ARTICLE – MASTER OF A BARGQUE CALLED THE CAPE HORN – BUT I AM NOT EVEN GOING NEAR THE SANERS/SAUNDERS DEBATE AT THE MOMENT.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article690078

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 14 September 1850,

1854 –  A VERY ANGRY J SANDERS, PUBLICAN IN ARMIDALE,  PROTESTS THE ACCUSATION BROUGHT AGAINST HIM RE THE SERVING OF ALCOHOL TO AN INTOXICATED MAN . IN TYPICAL SANDERS MAN HE DECLARES

IF THIS BE JUSTICE – FAREWELL LIBERTY.

AND REFUSES TO RENEW HIS LICENCE. 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article688195

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 15 April 1854, page 3.

SANDERS MISCELLANY IN NLA NEWSPAPERS : 1849 AND WILLIAM AND MARY ANN ARRIVE ON THE VICTORIA.

Now we look at the era 1849 onwards. The shipping indents say that neither WILLIAM nor MARY ANN had any living relatives in the Colony. Just to remind you.  However, later research indicates that they went to the property of THOMAS SANDERS who came as convict in 1791. Out west of Sydney.

NSW STATE ARCHIVES  REEL 58

ASSISTED IMMIGRANTS INWARDS TO SYDNEY PER SHIP VICTORIA ARRIVED 2nd SEP 1849

SAUNDERS, WILLIAM –  26 YEAR OLD BUTCHER BORN KENTON DEVONSHIRE SON OF WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH SAUNDERS – STILL LIVING IN KENTON C OF E. READS AND WRITES NO RELATIONS LIVING IN COLONY IN GOOD HEALTH. COMPLAINED OF SHORT ISSUE OF RATIONS DURING EARLY PART OF VOYAGE

 

SAUNDERS MARY ANN – 19 YEARS FARM SERVANT BORN SILVERTON DEVONSHIRE DAUGHTER OF GEORGE AND GRACE SKIVINGS STILL LIVING IN SILVERTON C OF E READS AND WRITES NO RELATIONS IN COLONY IN GOOD HEALTH.

__________________________________________________________

 

 

MARY ANN SKIVINGS
MARY ANN SKVINGS SANDERS CAME FREE ON THE VICTORIA WITH WILLIAM

SANDERS MEN BLACKBERRY , FRED J, FRED W , ESSEL REECE

BLACKBERRY BILL AND HIS LADS

SANDERS AS I HAVE FOUND THEM IN THE

NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIAN HISTORIC

NEWSPAPERS

NO KNOWN CONNECTION TO OUR FAMILY :

HOWEVER – ONE NEVER KNOWS.

1849 – AND A MR E SANDERS IS LISTED AS AN EMIGRATION AGENT IN ANDOVER ( ENGLAND ) The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 3 February 1849, page 2.
1849 – A MR E SANDER WAS LEAVING SYDNEY ON THE STEAMER SHAMROCK FOR MELBOURNE, TWOFOLD BAY AND LAUNCESTON.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article705017
1849 –

Married. On the 19th May, by special license, at St. Paul’s Church, Port Adelaide, by the Rev. G. C. Newenham, Captain Thomas Sanders, of the barque Margaret Brock, to Margaret, eldest daughter of Mr. W. Galway, of Port Adelaide, and formerly of West Maitland.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article702341

1849 –

26th day of November.

conditional pardons.

His Excellency the Governor has directed it to be notified, that her Majesty has been graciously pleased to authorise the issue of pardons to the undermentioned persons, on condition that during the remainder of the term of their respective sentences, they do not return to the countries or colonies from which they were respectively transported, as hereunder more particularly specified. Dated 20th September, 1849. Pardons available everywhere, save in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland,

SANDERS, SUSAN.

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article699166

SUSAN SANDERS in the 1950s
 60 susan as a french lady
PARDONED FOR WHAT ?

IMMIGRATION REPORT 1852

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article671085

 

IMMIGRATION REPORT FOR 1852 INCLUDING STATISTICS FOR THE WHOLE PERIOD OF EMIGRATION.

VERY DETAILED PROFILE OF IMMIGRATION IN AUSTRALIA.

 

(The following year 1853 sees the arrival of the CRAIGS, HURRELLS and JACKSONS. )

 

wilhelmina mcleod 

WILHELMINA MCLEOD

20 12 some indians

WHERE HAVE WE COME FROM ?

THE SANDERS AND IMMIGRATION

I have had information about the Sanders for years now but not put it together. Now I am accessing the Newspapers and understanding a little more of what was involved in the emigration/immigration process, I shall write out some of the details I have and see how they fit with the NLA Articles.

William Sanders married Mary Ann Skivings and they emigrated to Australia.  They sailed from Plymouth on the ship VICTORIA and arrived in SYDNEY on September 4th, 1849 ( 100 years before I was born). Their shipping papers state that they had no relations living in the Colony ( this is disputed re THOMAS SANDERS at Appin but neither is verified by primary source as yet) . Dick Sanders found that the property at Appin to which they went on arriving was at PROSPECT ( now known as WENTWORTHVILLE) and was owned by THOMAS SANDERS who had 100 acres there. Elizabeth Grace, their first child was born there.

They then came north alone the NEW ENGLAND HIGHWAY looking for land. From ARMIDALE, they turned East to the Coast and came to the Macleay River. They moved about in this area for about 8 years before William purchased a block of 60 acres  and paid 60 pounds. DATE AUGUST 13 – 1863.

Each of the children was given a block of land to make a living on. William finally transferred the land to two of his sons, WALTER THOMAS  and EDRED JAMES on Nov 1 1898. These were two younger sons.

It was through SANDERS land that the road was re-routed to HAT HEAD to avoid swampland.

Dick Sanders said that where the school now stands was SANDERS property. Kinchela School.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

HERE ARE SOME PERSPECTIVES OF IMMIGRATION AT APP THE SAME PERIOD. 1849. FROM THE NLA HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article712494

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 15 April 1848, page 2.

ARRIVAL OF IMMIGRANTS IN MAITLAND.

By Thursday morning’s mail the Police Magistrate received a letter from the Immigration Agent in Sydney intimating that free passages to Maitland on Thursday evening, with board and lodging until they should receive offers of employment at fair wages, would be offered to as many of the immigrants by the Suhraon as chose to avail themselves of the opportunity of at once proceeding to the country ; and requesting the Police Magistrate to make arrangements to receive those who might be sent. Accordingly, by yesterday’s steamer, 57 of the immigrants reached Maitland, and have been lodged in the house formerly occupied by Mr. Rae, next door to the late Blue Bell Inn, East Maitland ; and are now ready to make engagements. Of the new arrivals, 10 are single men, 10 single women, the remainder married couples

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article708687

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 11 October 1848, page 1

ORPHAN EMIGRANTS.
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article706650

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 3 January 1849, page 2.

A stream of immigration from the mother country has also once more set in upon us, and, as our immigration debt has been paid off, we have every prospect of a steady accession of population from the same source

 

IMMIGRATION ISSUES 1849

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article706437

    THE COLONIZATION SOCIETY.

    MAITLAND MERCURY SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1849.

 

    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article706387

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article705911

SIR-I came to Maitland last week for the  purpose of hiring a few immigrants. I attended the places where they are quartered, and I could not see more, than six or eight at either place.  In taking a ride over to West Maitland I met them in lots of six or eight, and numbers I saw taking their walks on the race-course. These  walks ought to be taken at times so as not to  inconvenience people that may come to hire  these gentlemen. Some observations on this  subject may cause such restrictions as will  operate for the benefit of all parties.

I remain,

sir, yours truly,

Newcastle, July 14, 1849.

J. S.

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 18 July 1849, page 2.

 

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article699943

Immigrants.-On Thursday 124 of the immigrants per Kate arrived in Maitland per steamer, comprising 21 married couples, 19 young men and 11 young women above the age of fourteen years, 13 boys and 8 girls between ten and fourteen years, and 31 children under ten years. Of these there had been hired up to yesterday afternoon four married men, as farm or general servants, one at 6s. per week, and the others at £16, £20, and £23 per year, the two latter having one a son and the other a wife to assist, and the first getting current harvest and reaping wages in those seasons ; seven young men, five as farm servants, at £12, £13, £14, and £16 per year, and two as shepherds, at £16 per year ; and one boy of thirteen years as domestic servant, at £4 the first year and £6 the second ; all these parties having rations or board and lodging, in proportion to services .

 

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 29 September 1849, page 2.

Contracts for 1850.- In the Government Gazette of Tuesday last appear the usual notices calling for tenders for supplies for the colonial service, in such quantities as may be required, during twelve months commencing 1st January, 1850; one notice calls for such tenders for districts within the boundaries, and the other for districts beyond the boundaries, and in both cases tenders will be received at the Colonial Secretary’s Office, Sydney, until twelve o’clock of Monday, 12th November. The districts within the boundaries which are comprised in the Hunter River and,northern districts, are Mudgee, Newcastle and Raymond Terrace, Dungog, Maitland, Wollombi and Macdonald River, Paterson, Patrick’s -Plains, Merton and Muswellbrook, Scone and Murrurundi, and Cassilis. The districts beyond the boundaries comprised in the same portion of the colony, are Bligh, Liverpool Plains, Gwydir, New England, Darling Downs, Clarence River, and Maranoa. In these latter districts it is noted, that the stations at which supplies will be required to be delivered, are-Dubbo, Canamble, and Wiabra, in the district of Bligh ; Tamworth, Wee Waa, and Pockataroo, in the district of Liverpool Plains; Warialda, in the district of Gwydir; Armidale, Wellingrove, and Tenterfield, in the district of New England ; Drayton and Warwick, in the district of Darling Downs ; Grafton and Tabulam, in the district of Clarence River ; in the district of Maranoa no stations are named.

 

IMMIGRATION IN THE NLA NEWSPAPERS

Known Immigrants in the family at this time are :

YEAR SHIP PERSON/S FROM TO
1839 JAMES MORGAN JANET MACKAY AND CHILDREN INC WILHELMINA MCLEOD SUTHERLAND SHIRE SCOTLAND SYDNEY
1849 VICTORIA WILLIAM  SANDERS AND MARY ANN SKIVINGS (MARRIED COUPLE) DEVON ENGLAND SYDNEY
1853 WILLIAM BROWN JACKSONS   SYDNEY
1853 BEEJAPORE THOMAS CRAIG , PARENTS AND SIBLINGS   SYDNEY
1853 BEEJAPORE HURRELLS   SYDNEY

ARTICLES ON EMIGRATION/IMMIGRATION IN NLA NEWSPAPERS:

 
 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640683

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640671

 
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640576

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE TAKEN BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION. MAY l8, 1835

The Superintendent having left the ship before her arrival in Port Jackson, there was latterly no control whatever over the women, and some of them who had been
allowed to land, immediately after the ship came to anchor, were picked up quite drunk in the streets of Sydney, on the evening of their arrival.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639961

The Perth Gazette and… Saturday 10 June 1837, page 918

SYDNEY. IMMIGRATION COMMITTEE. (From the Sydney “Colonist . “

This committee report came out the year before Mary Ann and William Sanders  came on the VICTORIA.

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639961

 

  • The Government, however, have latterly proposed a measure for the encouragement and promotion of emigration which, if the settlers were at all alive to their own interests and disposed to cooperate in securing them, would be tantamount to the adoption of our original recommendation. For, at a cost for agency which would be altogether insignificant for each individual or family brought out to the colony, the respectable colonists might have seemed through the Government measure we allude to, the immediate introduction of two or three thousand families of virtuous and industrious emigrants of the classes chiefly required in the colony.

 

 
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639883

LAND AND IMMIGRATION COMPANY.

An experiment has been tried in New South Wales to increase the number of immigrants by the formation of a Land and Immigration Company. The shares to be raised were 5,000, one half to be disposed of in the colony, and the other half to be reserved for capitalists in England. As we are also in need of an augmentation of our numbers, the hint may not be unprofitably applied ;

 

Archives Investigator  
State Records Authority of New South Wales

 IMMIGRATION – The Bounty System


 

Extracted from the:- “Concise Guide to State Archives of New South Wales

Shipping & Passenger Records
Ballarat & District Genealogical Society Inc

 

 

LIST OF SHIPPING SITES AND EMIGRATIONS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article639883

The McLeods and Mackays perhaps from the Sutherland Shire !

3rd. In Scotland, and the north of Ireland, where no such contribution could be looked for, but where the lower classes, being more intelligent, industrious and frugal, would be better fitted for roughing it in a new colony, virtuous and industrious families of these classes would willingly bind themselves to pay that amount from the first of their savings after their arrival ; and if in the event of their purchasing land on credit from the Company, this debt were to be chargeable on the land, its repayment would be secured.

 

http://www.angelfire.com/ns/bkeddy/HIES/1.html
_________________________________________________
Highland and Island Emigration Society, HIES
_____________________________________
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article642443

In fact, the obstructions, the suspense, and the jobbing of the present system, tend to destroy, the property, if not work the absolute ruin €of the poorer class of immigrants. An individual of this description on his arrival is forced to leave his family in Sydney, whilst he proceeds to explore the north, the south, or the westward, for a suitable location

 

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm 

Mary-Anne Warner’s site transcribing STATE RECORDS of SHIPS. easy to navigate. Detailed.

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS

Wednesday 14 April 1847 : THE MAITLAND MERCURY AND HUNTER GAZETTE

IMMIGRATION.

Whereas, by reason of the difference of
climate and soil, many commodities pro-
ducible in this colony, such as wine, oil,
silk, Sec, are not produced in the United
Kingdom, and the skilled labourers requisite
for their culture or manufacture cannot in
consequence be obtained by the colony from
the mother country ; and whereas it is deemed
expedient to afford to such of the colonists
as may desire to employ their land and
capital in the production of such commo-
dities as aforesaid, the means of providing
themselves with the required labourers from
such foreign countries as can supply them :
His Excellency the Governor directs it to be
notified, that subject to the approval of her
Majesty’s government, and under the con-
ditions hereinafter mentioned, there will be
granted to settlers who shall be at the charge
of bringing into New South Wales, for their
own services, emigrants from the continent
of Europe, a pecuniary aid or bounty at the
following rates:

(1») -For a married man and his wife, neither

of whose ages shall exceed on embarkation
fifty years-£36.

(2). For each child, male or female, above

the age of fourteen years, for whose parents,
or either of them, the foregoing bounty is
allowed (but for no other children or un-
married persons)-£18.

II. Before any payments are made under
this regulation, the immigrants on whose
account they are claimed must present them-
selves before a board appointed by the
Governor to inspect them.

Each married man and each of his un-
married sons who shall have reached the
age of eighteen years, must produce to the
board testimonials of good character, and of
their being duly qualified for the particular
employments which they have been brought
to the colony to fill. These testimonials
must be signed by clergymen and respect-
able inhabitants of note in the place of the
immigrant’s former residence, and authen-
ticated by a certificate of the secretary to
the land and emigration commissioners in
London, that after enquiry that board has
seen no reason to doubt their correctness or
credibility.

Every individual for whom bounty is
claimed, must produce a certificate, shewing
his or her parents” Christian names and sur-
names, and the age of which he or she is
known or reputed to be.; and this certificate
must be also authenticated by the secretary
to the land and emigration commissioners.

If the board shall be satisfied with these

documents, and that the persons presented
before them are within the prescribed ages,
of sound mind, of good bodily health and
strength, and in all other respects likely to
be useful members of their class in society,
and that they haye been duly supplied
during the voyage with a sufficiency of good
and wholesome provisions, and water, the
latter in the proportion’ of at least three
quarts per day for every emigrant, and with
reasonably comfortable accommodation, a
report lo that effect will be made by the
board, and so soon thereafter as it shall be
shewn by the person bringing out the emi-
grants, that be has removed them from

Sydney or Melbourne (as the case may be),
for the purpose of placing them on his own
property, a warrant will be issued for the
payment of the sum to which he shall be

entitled under this notice.

III. Any settler desiring to avail himself
of the bounties promised by this notice,
must transmit to the Colonial Secretary, at
Sydney, or to the Superintendent of Port
Phillip, at Melbourne, a list, specifying, as
accurately as circumstances will permit, the
number, condition, and calling of the per-
sons whom he may .propose to bring out. In
no case will bounties be allowed, unlesB the
claimant shall have made such application,
and shall have received in reply an official
intimation that (subject, as already stated,
to the approval of her Majesty’s govern-
ment) bounties will be granted on the intro-
duction of the persons described in his list.
The document containing this intimation
must be produced before the board by the
claimant, who will be required, at the same
time, to prove to the satisfaction of the
board, that the immigrants have been im-
ported in pursuance thereof. And in order
to guard against the inconvenience of long
outstanding claims against the government,

bounties will not be allowed unless the im-
migrants described in the application shall
be presented to the board within two <years
after the date of the notification -of accept-
ance by the Colonial’Secretary.

IV. To define the several descriptions of
labourers for whom bounties will ‘be allowed
under this notice would be impossible, and
an attempt to do so would be incoiiöi8t«-nt
with the object m view, which is to provide
the supply of labour requisite for the pro-
gressive tievelopement of the capabilities ot
the soil -as they may from time to time be-
come ‘further ¿known. It may, however, be
stated as a general rule, lhatithe government
will limit the allowance of bounty to such
labourers as are requisite for raising articles,
the produce of the soil, and for bringing
them into their simplest marketable -shape.
.In -illustration of this principle the cases of
wine and silk may be instdiiced. In the
former, bounties will ‘be given for all de-
scriptions of labourers necessary for the cul-
ture of the grape, and the manufacture and
casking of the wine. In the’ latter case,
bounties will be given for the labourers re-
quired for the production and preparation of
the raw material, but not for ils manufac-

ture.

Bounties will not be allowed under this
notice for persons above the labouring class,
such as overseers, nor for any labourers of
a description obtainable from the mother
country.

V. The fund available *for the purposes-of
this notice being »very limited, it must not be
expected that ‘the government will be able
at once’to promise the payment of bounties
on every application which it may see no
reason to disapprove. In any case, how-
ever, in which the government may be re-
strained by no other cause thau want of
means from .giving an ¡immediate assent to
an application, such application will be
noted in the Colonial Secretary’s Office, with
a view to its being entertained in preference
to others of a later date, whenever the re-
quisite funds may be at the disposal of the
government.

VI. It is to he distinctly understood, that
no quarantine oi other expenses whatever
attendant upon the introduction of emigrants
under this notice, will be defrayed by govern-
ment, excepting the bounties hereinbefore

mentioned.

VII. To prevent misapprehension and dis-
appointment, and to ensure a rigid adherence
to the principles of this regulation, it is
proper to state that the whole of the condi-
tions thereby imposed will be strictly con-
strued. Parties, therefore, who may intro-
duce immigrants not qualified by age, calling,
character, or otherwise, will do so entirely
at their own risk, and will have no claim on
the government to obtain the bounties offered
by the present notice.

___________________________________

His Excellency the Governor has been
pleased to appoint the following gentlemen

to be magistrates of the territory and its
dependencies, namely

Alexander Fitzgerald Crawford, Esq., of

Conungala, Macleay River.

Francis Townsend Rusden, Esq., of Lindsay,

Gwydir River, Liverpool Plains.

John Warne, Esq., of Fattorini’s Wharf,

Macleay River.

_____________________________________________

ACTS OF COUNCIL.

His Excellency the Governor directs it lo
be notified, that the Right Honorable the
Secretary of State for the Colonies has inti-
mated in his despatch, under date the 26th
June last, that her Majesty has been gra-
ciously pleased to approve and confirm the
undermentioned Acts, passed by the Go-
vernor and Legislative Council, in the ninth
year of her Majesty’s reign, viz. :

QtJi Victoria.

No. 31.-” An Act to continue for two years

‘ An Act to facilitate the apprehension of
transported felons and offenders illegally
at large, and of persons found with arms
and suspected to be robbers.'” (11th
June, 1846).

No. 32.-” An Act to continue for a limited

time an Act intituled 4 An Act for regu-
lating the conslitution of Juries, and for
the trial of issues in certain cases in the
Supreme Court of New South Wales ; and
further to amend the law relating to trial
by jury.'” (12th June, 1846).

No. 33.-” An Act to amend an Act intituled

‘ An Act to amend the laws relating to the
Savings’ Bank of New South Wales and
Port Phillip, respectively.’ ” (12th June,
1846).

No. 34.-” An Act to amend an Act intituled

* An Act to make provision for the safe
custody of and prevention of offences by
persons dangerously insane, and for the
care and maintenance of persons of un-
sound mind.’ ” (13th June, 1846).

 

____________________________________________

IMPOUNDINGS.

At St. Aubin’s pound, Scone, on the 29th
day of March, from the estate of Francis
Little, Esq., J.P.-One white cow, branded
on off rump B; one red and white heifer,
branded off rump MW; one brindle and
white cow, branded off rump MW, a male
calf by her side; one red and white cow,
branded off shoulder H, near rump W, near
ribs like B inside Q, and B under it, a white
heifer calf by her side; one yellow heifer,
white belly and flank, branded off thigh SA ;
one red sided heifer, branded near shoulder
PM; one black sided bullock, short tail,
illegible brand near thigh ; one red and white
spotted cow, brand off ribs S.S, O under, off
thigh S, male calf by her side; one straw-
berry hoop horned cow, branded off rump
FC ; one red sided cow, branded near rump
13, a bull calf by her side; damages 3d.
each. If not duly released, they will be sold
on the 3rd of May, [13s.

At Singleton, Patrick’s Plains, on the 1st
of April-One brown sided cow, white back,
belly, and hind legs, branded JA, L over,
near rump, near shoulder 9, a red female
calf by her side, unbranded ; one yellow cow,
down horns, white back and belly, branded
off rump J reversed, and T, or IT, a red
female calf by her side, while on back and
belly, unbranded ; one light brindle sided
cow, off ear slit, branded near rump JA, L
over, a red female calf by her side, white
back and belly, unbranded ; damages 2s.
each ; one yellow poley cow, white on back
and belly, branded off ribs wy, o over, wy
under, off rump ST, near side neck O ; one
red and white spotted heifer, if branded not
legible ; damages Is. each ; one dark bay
filly’, branded near shoulder 7, off shoulder
C, long tail, black points, three years old,
14£ hands high ; one bay filly, small star on
forehead, black points, fistula on shoulder,
branded off shoulder JW, three years old,
14$ hands high. Also, on the 4th April
One dark red bullock, white on tip of tail,
branded near shoulder 5, near rump WM, off
ribs H, damages 3d. If the above cattle are
not claimed on or before the 30th day of
April, they will be sold. [14s. 9d.

At Jerry’s Plains, on the 24th day of
March, from Cockfighter’s Creek-One snail
horned brindle sided cow, white back and
belly, branded T over O conjoined off thigh,
an illegible brand like IA on off shoulder;
one red cow, branded T over O conjoined on
off thigh, SD off hip, an illegible brand on
off shoulder ; one brown sided steer, speckled
head and feet, white back and belly,.like IM
or IH on off shoulder ; one red strawberry
young bull, branded WO on near hip; one
speckled and white bodied heifer, red neck
and head, an illegible brand on near shoulder
like N or H; one black sided heifer, speckled
and spotted points, piece out of off ear, a
brand like L on off hip, an illegible brand
underneath same. If not released on or
before 23rd of April they will be sold. [12s.

At Cassilis, on the 24th March, from the
estate of George Bowman, Esq., Rother-
wood, for trespass-One red brindle snail
horned bullock, branded S, C over, near
ribs, 22, o under, thigh ; one. red spotted
bullock, branded Dy near ribs, LT, © over,
off ribB ; one white cow, branded FT, O over,
near ribs, if branded, 2 off rump; damages
6d. per head. Also, from the estate of H.
Scott, Esq., on the 29th March, for trespass
-One black bull, white flanks, unbranded,
about twenty months old ; one dark red snail
horned bullock, branded FT, O over, near
ribs; one brown sided bullock, cock horne,
same brand; damages Gd. per head. If not
claimed on or before the 23rd day of April,
they will be sold. [12s. 3d.

_________________________________________

GENERAL POST OFFICE, SYDNEY.

List of unclaimed letters addressed to
persons resident in the Hunter River district,
for the month of March, 1847 :

Akins Thomas, Gammon Plaina ; AU Mr.,

Maitland ; Alexander Luke, Peel’s River ;
Armstrong Wm., Maitland; Ayster John,
Liverpool Plains.

Baxter Mr. Joseph, Maitland {-Bowman Mr.,

Black Creek ; Brown Joseph, Muswell
Brook ; Brabten Mr., Maitland ; Brad-
shaw Charles, Merton ; Brite Mrs. J. N.,
Maitland ; Brodie, Esq., Newcastle ;
Brooker Mr. John, Paterson; Brown
Samuel, Raymond Terrace ; Buchanan,
Esq., W., Paterson ; Buckley John, Mus-
well Brook; Button George, Muswell

Brook.

Calaghan William, Maitland ; Cameron

Samuel, Paterson River; Cameron Archi-
bald, Raymond Terrace; Carter Thomas,

Tamworth; Carter Wm,, Morpeth; Caton
Thomas, Maitland ; Chapman Mrs., Mait-
land; Clarke Mr. P., Peel’s River; Clarke
Mrs. T., Bolwarra ; Clarke Captain John,
Castlereagh ; Coleman Timothy, Peel’s
River ; Colley Mrs., Morpeth ; Collins
Edward, Richmond River; Corby William,
Scone ; Crisp M«”- George, Tamworth ;
CubbonMr. Peter, Maitland; Currie John,
Scone; CurtiB Mark, Morpeth.

Devine Mr. P., Morpeth; Dorey James,

Clarence River ; Doyle Martin, Maitland.
Emsworth William, Peel’s River; Eston

Thomas, Morpeth ; Evans Captain, New-

castle.

Flea Mr. James, Hinton ; Forster Mr. Joseph,

Plashett; Forster Mr. William, Jerry’s
Plains ; Foster, Esq., J., Scone.

Gill Mr. David, Tamworth; Goold Joseph,

Dungog ; Gorman, Mr. Jno., Peel’s River;
Gowers Mr. John, Maitland; Graham,
Esq., ‘Newcastle ; Goulding, Esq., John,
Manning River.

Hall William, Maitland ; Harnell Edward,

Liverpool Plains; Hancock William, New
England; Hassell Mr. John, Muswell
Brook ; Hickey James, Raymond Terrace ;
Hickey Timothy, Cassilis; Hudson Joseph,
Maitland ; Hughes Robert, Maitland.

Jackson Mr. R. J., Maitland ; Johnson G.,

New England; Jones Mr., Peel’s River;
Jones William, Surveyor’s Creek ; Jones
Joseph, Dulwich ; Jones Thomas, Macin-
tyre River; Jones Mrs., Clarence Town.

Kehoe Nicholas, Hinton ; Kendle William,

Liverpool Plains; Kill Charles, Raymond

Terrace.

Lances Mr. Thomas E., Cassilis; Langan

Mary, Cassilis; Langton Mr. Henry, New
England ; Leanghin Patrick, Morpeth ;
Levey Mr. S., Muswell Brouk ; Lewis Mr.
David, Peel’s River; Lowther Mr., Liver-
pool Plains.

Marsh Richard, Tamworth ; M’Alarey

Daniel, ‘Olarence River ; M’Greal Owen,
Manning Sliver ; M’Keachie A., Manning
?River ; M’Kinnon John, Bolwarra ;
M’Lachlan Mr. D., Muswell Brook ;
M’Maister Mr., Cassilis; M’Nair Joseph,
Maitland ; Moran John, Bengalla ; Mul-
lins Patrick, Maitland; Murry John,

Newcastle.

Nixon ¡lohn, Scone.

O’Plaherty Mr. Edward, PeePa River; Oliver,

Esq., W. E., Eskdale; O’Neal Mr. Wil-
lina!, Clarence Town.

Palmer Mr. Henry, Maitland; Patterson

James, Morpeth ; Perrier Mrs., Morpeth ;
Pike Henry, Black Creek- Poison Hugh,
Manning River ; PrendfU Mr. Robert,
PeePs River; Putter Mr. M., Lochinvar.
‘Quin Mr. John,”Stony Creek.

Keeves James, Kirkton; Renar Mr. Daniel,

Jerry’s Plains; Robinson Mr. J., Tam-
worth ; Rodgers Mr. J., Maitland ; Rod-
gers Alexander, Tamworth ; Rogers Mr.
J., Clarence Town ; Rule George, Tam-
worth ; Ryan Mr., Black Creek ; Ryder
Mr., Hinton.

Searle Mr. James, Liverpool Plains ; Slack

Mr. W. J., Maitland? Slater Thomas,
Burwood ; Smith Mr. James, Scone ; Smith
Mr. Thomas, Peel’s River; Starkie Mr.,
Raymond Terrace; Strong Mr. J., Page’s

River.

Tosswell, Mr. K. S., Namoi River; Tuck

Mr. James, Maitland ; Tye Charles, Mor-
peth ; Tye Mr. D. ; Tyne Edmond, Mait-

land.

Walsh Michael, Cassilis; Waring, Esq., C.

A., Raymond Terrace ; Watkins William,
Morpeth Road ; West Thomas, Liverpool
Plains ; Wilson John, Merton ; Wolf Mrs.
Catherine, Newcastle.

Young Mr. James, Gammon Plains ; Young

John, Maitland.

 

_________________________________________

State of the Female Factory, Parramatta,
on the 1st April, 1847 :

Under colonial sentence. 32
Not under colonial sentence… 55

In hospital. 16

Lunatics. 21

Total number of women. 124
Total number of children. 49

___________________

OCCUPATION LICENSE.

At 11 o’clock of Thursday, the 20th day of
May next, the Colonial Treasurer will put
up to auction, at the Colonial Treasury, in
Sydney, the licenses to occupy the following
portion of land, for one year, from the 1st
June, 1847.

The upset price of each lot is £5 per sec-

tion of 640 acres.

3. Gloucester, 800 acres, parish unnamed,
near Dingo Creek ; bounded on the north by
the Manning River.

Printed and published by Richard Jones,

at the “Maitland Mercury” Office, High
street, West Maitland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

_

About LYNNE BELL SANDERS – BRAITHWAITE « LYNNE BELL SANDERS

Climate and Culture Connections in Australia Neville Nicholls Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne

Some interesting influences of climate on culture in Australia inc 19th century .

http://www.bom.gov.au/bmrc/clfor/cfstaff/nnn/culture.PDF

e.g.

The mid-19th century saw a succession of arguments about whether the Australian climate was
“healthy” (Nicholls, 1997). Just one of these debates concerned tuberculosis (then known as
consumption or phthisis). As early as 1850 Australia was being promoted as having a climate beneficial
to consumptives, leading to a “rush” of consumptives to the colonies. One medical critic of this
promotion was expelled from the Medical Society of Victoria for his “heretical” views. The debate then
raged between the medical profession and the Victorian Government Statist, Henry Heylyn Hayter, who
used his Victorian Government Year Books to attack the belief that the climate was favourable for the
cure of consumption. The Age newspaper took Hayter’s side, but the debate continued until the end of
the century. Writers encouraged emigration to the colonies by stressing the quality of the climate:
“What do our struggling thousands gain by emigration to such lands as Australia and New Zealand, and
what do they lose? For the foggy uncertain climate of Great Britain they will find one equally healthful
and invigorating” (Heatherington, 1883).

 

and

About the same time, on the other side of the world, a development in climatology which would have a
profound impact on the Australian economy was under way. After an injury forced him from active
service, Lieutenant Matthew Maury of the US Navy in 1842 took charge of the Navy’s Depot of Charts
and Instruments in Washington. While in this office he compiled oceanographic data from old and
current ship logs, to prepare charts of winds and currents, “for the improvement of commerce and
navigation” (Maury, 1857). His published charts and books were in immediate demand from sailors, and
led to a sudden reduction in the duration of voyages. Maury notes that the charts reduced the England-
Australia round trip from 250 days to 160 days, saving British commerce an estimated ten million (U.S.)
dollars annually (Maury, 1857, viii). The commercial importance of this increased understanding of the
climate of the globe must have had marked impacts on the Australian colonies.

australian women in 19th century poetry – Google Search