Category Archives: BENSON

READY, BENSON, RUSSELL

Jan Russell said

March 20, 2011 at 11:48 am e

What a wonderful find. It has filled out names into people altho it doesn’t continue my branch past Peter Mark Ready and Sarah Ann Benson. They were my great great grandparents,by way of their daughter Elizabeth Hannah,who married John James Smith (aka Thomas Smith).Their daughter Mabel Mildred lambert was my grandmother. She married Frederick Eager Lambert , my father Donald Caitcheon Eager Lambert was their elder son.

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/07/22/john-ready-and-the-three-bees/#comment-996

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COLONIAL MOTHERS

THE SAG Newsletter reports that Dr Tanya Evans, now of Macquarie University, is engaged in researching the history of motherhood in early Colonial Australia and Britain between 1750 and 1850. The focus has caught my fancy. My Mind seems to have taken a disproportionate amount of time in recovering from the Change of year and the Summer Season and I haven’t been able to get my mental historical  hard drive functioning at all but this little article has begun to bring the ghosts back to life again. Dr Evans is asking for assistance from any who have worked extensively on their family histories and have details of mothers from these early times. Dept of Modern History at Macquarie University, Sydney would have the contact details for you.

As for me, it has me thinking of all the Mothers of Mine who and the folkore I have been given. The Scottish Widow who was asked to be Laird of the Clan but came out here with her children instead.  Johannah Ready Prendergast, whose son John was sent as a convict to Government House at Windsor where his mother was Housekeeper. I wonder often about Johannah who was 47 when convicted in Ireland. She tried to have another son and his family sent out but failed. When John’s marriage failed and he became excessively odd in his behaviour and was sentenced to Moreton Bay, Johannah disappears from the records. I like to think she followed him.

Ann Moran and Hannah Hutchings/Hitchens. What was it like for them to be mothers here in the early 19th Century ? Young convict women. Ann had 5 children to John Curtis who was already husband and father to a family in England and had attempted to have them brought to him.  Hannah was recorded as a ‘ loose woman’ on the convict ship THE BROTHERS. How did her life as a mother develop from that starting point and from the death of her first husband in the Lunatic Asylum, Liverpool ?

SARAH ANN READY ( BENSON) & GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

image 

0 2 sarah & george moore 19th C

SARAH ANN READY (BENSON)

1830-1910

GEORGE MOORE Jnr

1828 -1903

PHIL of READY OR NOT has now sent me an email in response to my request to use his research online. PERMISSION GRANTED said Phil only recently back in Action  after a nasty accident. It was years of work and travel and research that provided the information on the READY line for this generation. PERMISSION GRANTED.  A very gracious response indeed. Phil is currently at work on his Index and updates on READY OR NOT.

from ready or not ; following the death of Peter Mark Ready on the Goldfields of Victoria. Following on from

PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON ON THE GOLDFIELDS

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/07/27/peter-mark-ready-and-sarah-ann-benson-on-the-goldfields/

SARAH ANN (BENSON) READY and GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

Faced with the problem of survival, and with 5 young children to feed, on the 30th October 1863, Peter Mark Ready’s widow, SARAH READY, took the only acceptable course open to her. At the age of 31, 16 months after her husband’s death, she married 35 year old GEORGE MOORE, born in 1828 in SYDNEY to GEORGE MOORE Snr and ANN TRACEY. ( Vol 63 no 897 RGI )

GEORGE MOORE’s relationship to the family before the tragedy is not known but he seems to have been a close friend. Soon after the death of PETER MARK READY, he brought the family back to NSW for it would have been an unhappy reminder to all if they had remained. The fact that George had paid for the funeral and married Sarah the following year, taking on 5 children at the same time says something of his regard for them.

 

GEORGE SENIOR AND ANN TRACEY. George Jnr’s father, GEORGE MOORE Snr, was a 19 year old carpenter who had been living at Newcastle, England , when he was sentenced at his trial on 24 October 1821 to a life sentence and transportation to NSW. Arriving aboard the ASIA II on 24 July 1822, he was assigned to work for SOLOMON LEVY in SYDNEY and in 1826 received permission from the Governor to marry. His marriage to ANN TRACEY who had come free to the Colony, took place on 5 February 1827 and over the next 24 years they had a family of three sons. GEORGE 1828. HENRY 1832  WILLIAM 1842.and a daughter MARY in 1851. George had received a conditional pardon from the Governor in 1837 and lived until 17 April 1883.

 

GEORGE MOORE Jnr and SARAH settled down in SYDNEY and three years later a son WILLIAM THOMAS MOORE was born, the first of their three children. A daughter ESMA was born in 1870 and the last of their children HENRY THOMAS MOORE was born in 1874.

Seeing an opening, GEORGE MOORE Jnr set up as a PRODUCE MERCHANT at 165 Sussex Street Sydney with the family residence at 92 GLEBE STREET, GLEBE. it was here in this area that the children went to school and grew to maturity until on the 4th April 1874, Sarah Ann Ready married WILLIAM HENRY WATSON, a blacksmith from NEW ZEALAND. Four years later, in 1878, her sister ELIZABETH HANNAH READY, married JOHN SMITH and on the 10 June 1879, three months before the establishment of the first steam trams in Sydney, the last of PETER MARK READY’S daughters CATHERINE LOUISA was married to JOSEPH HOWE.

1897 saw the marriage of HENRY MOORE their younger half brother to ELLEN MCPHEE, setting up home across the road from his parents at No 75 GLEBE ROAD GLEBE. Esma Moore appears not to have married.

At the time GEORGE MOORE died , Sarah and he were living in no 94 Glebe Road Glebe, the house next door to their original home. it was here that Sarah died on 17 October 1910. Their graves are in the Church of England Section of Rookwood Cemetery along with the body of one of Sarah’s grandchildren FREDERICK BENSON READY.

There is some evidence that SARAH and PETER MARK READY may have quarrelled on the night so long before when he was killed, for a saying has come down through their daughter Sarah Ann Watson’s branch of the family ;

“ NEVER SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR HUSBAND IN ANGER FOR HE MAY FALL DOWN A MINE.”

SARAH ANN(BENSON) READY m 30/10/1883 GEORGE MOORE JNR
WILLIAM THOMAS
1865-1872
ESMA
1868
HENRY THOMAS
1874-19??
M ELLEN MCPHEE

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

FROM MARILYN;  George Moore married Sarah Ann Ready in Sydney not Victoria, have a marriage transcript and it says Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth St, Sydney, witnesses Henry Samuels (step father) and Jane Samuels!!  Hadn’t noticed before but this must be a half sister, but is she ‘Jane’ or ‘Hannah’.

Their 3rd child, Henry Thomas Moore who married Ellen McPhee, then their 2nd child Leslie Francis Moore who married Gladys May Robinson, then their 1st child Gladys Ivy Moore who married , Allen William Roberts

TRIAL OF GEORGE MOORE SENIOR

GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS, GEORGE MOORE, Theft > pocketpicking, 24th October 1821.

Reference Number: t18211024-151
Offence: Theft ; pocketpicking
Verdict: Guilty; Guilty
Punishment: Transportation

FROM TRIALS OF THE OLD BAILEY ONLINE http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18211024-151-defend1366&div=t18211024-151#highlight

1324. GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS and GEORGE MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of James Larbalesher , from his person .

JAMES LARBALESHER . On Monday last, between twelve and one o’clock at night, I was at the corner of Hatton-garden , coming home with my wife, several people passed near me, I felt and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner Lewis give it to a woman. I took him and the woman. Moore came up and said, "What have you to do with this woman, she has nothing of yours." I called the watch and took Moore too as an accomplice; he endeavoured to escape, but I pursued and took him. I do not know what became of the woman. I am sure I saw it in Lewis’s hand.

BENJAMIN RUSHBROOK . I was parting from a few friends at the corner of Hatton-garden. I heard a bustle, and saw Moore lay hold of the prosecutor, and say "What have you to do with this woman, she has no handkerchief of yours." The prosecutor took him, the woman escaped with the handkerchief.

THOMAS BARTLET . The prisoners were given in my charge.

LEWIS’S Defence. I was out of employ and was distressed, my parents having a large family I did not like to live on them, which caused me to keep late hours. I humbly implore mercy.

MORRIS’S Defence. I got intoxicated and shoved one of these gentlemen, but what else I did I cannot say. I was in the woman’s company.

LEWIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

MORRIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

GEORGE MOORE SENIOR

GEORGE MOORE SENIOR

Ticket of Leave details for George Moore

Last name
Moore

First name
George

Ship
Asia

Year
1822

Native place
NR

Trade or calling
Carpenter

District
MGD

Ticket no
34/1326

State Records shelf ref
4/4420

State Records reel

no
2688

Ticket of Leave details for George Moore

Last name
Moore

First name
George

Ship
Asia

Year
1822

Native place
Newcastle/Tyne

Trade or calling
Carpenter

District
MGD

Ticket no
41/1720

State Records shelf ref
4/4153

State Records reel no
941

 

 

 

WITH THANKS TO SAG

PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON ON THE GOLDFIELDS

GAZETEER OF NEWSPAPERS ON VICTORIAN GOLDFIELDS.

FROM PHIL READY’S READY OR NOT

PETER MARK READY 1829-1862 AND SARAH ANN BENSON 1830 -1910

http://lynnesheritage.myheritage.com/FP/home.php?authenticate=0bfaa109c6ae44ec7b86fe3956a1983147e9d271-117890811

On the 21st April 1851 Peter Mark Ready aged 21 married Sarah Ann Benson at St Mary’s Cathedral Sydney. The ceremony was conducted by John Kavanagh and witnessed by Peter Mark’s sister Bridget and their cousin William Curtis. The first of their five children Sarah Ann Ready . named after her mother, was born on the 7th March 1852. ( Sarah Ann Benson – daughter of Thomas Benson and Hannah Hutchings )

Caught up by Gold fever Peter Mark set out with Sarah and their daughter for White Hills in the Maryborough district of the Victorian Goldfields.

The road up from Melbourne through Castlemaine was crowded with traffic of all kinds whilst the town of Maryborough was made up of canvas and very lively. Freight was 40 pounds per ton from Melbourne  and flour sold at famine prices. However, as mutton was quite cheap, the whole town lived on that and damper. The water supply came from the deep creek at Carlsbrook five miles away and sold for 1 shilling 6 pence a bucket. The gold lead however ran for 8 miles with a great deal of it on the surface and some very rich gold was obtained. because of the shortage of water the washdirt had either to be stacked until the rains  came or carted to Carlsbrook.

The mine at White Hills was sunk through what was known as white cement but once through into the pipeclay underneath the nuggets picked out paid the men very well for their hard work. Gold was found in almost every hole dug despite the distance from water and within three months of its beginning there were 30 000 men on the field.

It was here at White Hills living under these conditions in a canvas shelter with a shortage of water and an open fire for cooking that the second of Peter Mark and Sarah Ann’s daughters was born. Elizabeth Hannah on 30 march 1853, followed 4 years later on 12th June 1857 by their first son Peter. Three years later again on the 12 January 1860 Catherine Louisa was born, hopefully by now in something a little more substantial.

Hearing of a rich new discovery of gold at Back Creek near Amherst which was situated on the main road between Castlemaine and Adelaide  and where gold had been discovered by a party of travellers in 1852, Peter Mark    decided to try his fortune there. Packing their few possessions the family set out for the new diggings at Back Creek.

Amherst had been the centre of the district with many hotels and businesses and in 1857 a hospital had opened which was to operate for another 76 years.

The diggings at back Creek had commenced in late 1858 when a few parties of diggers were prospecting in shallow ground skirting the two flats near Amherst later famous as Kangaroo and Scandanavian Flats. A lead following down to one of the fltas bottomed out at a depth of fourteen feet on some very rich paydirt and very soon there  were 30000 men working on this field. Other leads were soon discovered nearby and these turned out to be the richest three fields in the Colony. Nuggets from 10 to 80 ounces were often found and one party found 64 ounces in their first lead of washdirt.

With the number of men growing at such a rate at Back Creek it was only a short time before framed  calico covered stores arose with tools , clothing, provision, bottles of ales and spirits and other items required by diggers brought up from Melbourne in carts and wagons.  These were soon disposed of by the storekeepers and the hawkers who threaded their way around town.

With the amount of gold being dug up money was abundant and as a result business was brisk. Soon there were dancehalls, billard rooms, barber shops and restaurants and by 1860 Back Creek had taken over from Amherst as the district’s centre A substantial Police Camp already existed in the town by this to deal with the unruly elements which usually tagged onto these mining towns. The town also had its own Gas Works and the Courthouse Hotel ( later it was to boast 40 hotels ).

  By 1861 the name of the town had been changed to Talbot and a fine theatre , The Theatre Royal, which played to packed houses and was unfortunately burnt down later that year , was built. A Brewery and a Court House were also completed  and a private hall later to become the Town Hall erected.

On the 2nd June 1862 tragedy struck Peter Mark’s Family at Back Creek.

Peter Mark had commenced work at 8pm with several of his mates at their claim at Rocky Flat. After about 1 1/2 hours at the windlass, Peter Mark and some of the others stood around a fire near the claim. When the others left, Peter Mark, Franci Park and Robert Louden went to a shanty nearby where they drank 3 gins each. According to Francis Park , they were all quite sober when he (Francis) went to his tent, whilst Peter Mark and Robert Louden returned to the windlass. Louden suggested that they have something to eat or lie down for  a while but Peter Mark was determined to work and started to wind up the windlass. Louden then went to assist him and they wound up the bag of mullock to the top.

After securing the windlass Louden turned to help Peter Mark take the bag off the rope but found him missing. He called for assistance and Francis Park ran over to assist in removing the bag.

Mathew Green who was working one hundred feet below at the bottom of the shaft heard some gravel fall and then a noise like a bag falling. He had just stepped back into a drive where , about ninety to a hundred feet along, another mate was working , when Peter Mark crashed heavily to the bottom.

Mathew called to the others to get a  doctor . They secured Peter Mark to the rope and hauled him to the top but as the doctor stated he was quite dead, his neck being dislocated and his skull fractured.

At the subsequent inquest, the jury brought in a verdict that Peter Mark was accidentally killed by slipping down a hole at Rocky Flat and that no blame attached to any of his mates.

Peter Mark’s funeral was held on Thursday 4th June 1862, just nine weeks after the birth of his second son , Henry James Ready, on the 31st March. The funeral which cost 7 pounds 5 shillings was paid for by George Moore whose father , also George Moore, had arrived aboard the Atlas I on its second voyage to the Colony arriving on 24th July 1822 from England.

The Talbot Times of Friday 6th June 1862 carried an article:

A sad accident happened on Monday evening last at Rocky Flat resulting in a miner named Peter Hogan ( surname of Thomas Hogan his stepfather) meeting with a very sudden death. The particulars of this melancholy case are reported in full in another column to which we refer our readers. The accident happened about two and one half hours after the various ‘night shifts’ had commenced their work in their claims and on it being known along the lead all the miners to the number of 150 ceased work and hoisted flags to half mast high on their claim as a token of respect for the departed.

That accidents of this nature are not more frequent on our leads is somewhat surprising when we pause to consider how  unprotected are all of the shafts and how, in the darkness of the night, men work at the mouth of their claims as though they bear a charm against accident. The funeral of the deceased took place yesterday and was attended by a very large number of persons chiefly miners.

The deceased leaves a widow and five children in destitute circumstances and for whose relief a subscription has been opened. “

Devastated by the loss of her husband and her means of support, left in this newborn town of miners and those whose livelihood depends on them, with five young children to feed Sarah was in a perilous position. It was fortunate that John Thomas Hogan, Peter Mark’s half-brother was around. He supplied the information for Peter Mark’s death certificate although he was unaware of what Peter Mark’s father’s given name was and as so often happens in cases where people are faced with a sudden crisis such as this , John Thomas got the name of his sister-in-law wrong giving it as Sanders instead of Benson ( interesting ! ) .

The other miners too had been most considerate  and had not only shown their respect by stopping work but had rallied to aid the grief stricken widow.

Peter Mark’s grave , no longer evident, at Amherst Cemetery bore the name of PETER Mk READY HOGAN.

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/05/23/hannahs-family/

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/05/22/more-about-hannah/

OTHER SITES OF INTEREST.

http://www.oldnewscopy.com/search/resultform.asp 

http://www.oldnewscopy.com/search/resultform.asp

http://www.oldnewscopy.com/search/resultform.asp

CHILDREN OF PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON

  • SARAH ANN                 1852
  • ELIZABETH HANNAH   1853
  • PETER                         1857
  • CATHERINE                 1860
  • HENRY                         1862

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

LYNNE SANDERS-BRAITHWAITE

HANNAH’S FAMILY

From Penny and Marilyn I have further info.

To begin with, Phil Ready provided the following information. 

Hannah Hitchens first married Thomas Benson ( who is officially and possibly my ancestor ) and they had 2 daughters MARY ANN and SARAH ANN.

HANNAH HUTCHINS

MARRIED 15/3/1826

THOMAS BENSON
MARY ANN
6/5/1627
  SARAH ANN
3/7/1831
 
Following Thomas’ death in Liverpool Asylum, Hannah bore children to and later married HENRY SAMUELS.
 
  HANNAH HUTCHENS MARRIED 12/9/1836 HENRY SAMUELS
HANNAH
1832
LOUISA
1837
HENRY W
1840
JAMES C
1842
ELLEN
1846
 
PENNY  SENT THESE DETAILS :
 
  •  
    • Greatly interested as  Hannah Hitchens/Hutchings is my gt gt grandmother by her second marriage to Henry Samuels. Their daughter Louisa Matilda married to Jabez Brown was my gt grand mother.I have just this very day being trying to trace both parts of the familie’s movements in Victoria and NSW. When was Thomas Benson admitted to Liverpool asylum and why? Hannah and Henry’s 1st child Hannah was born in 1832 within days of his death and they did not mary until 1836 with permission of the govt. Hannah did not get her Conditional Pardon until 1838.Henry was also a convict.
      Cheers Penny
  •  
    • The plot thickens!!!
    • No I don’t have much on Hannah Samuels jnr/Kilfoyle except Victorian death certs for her and husband Joseph (1889 & 1905).in Victoria.

      I also have dc’s for all her Samuels siblings except Ellen and a bc for Benson 1/2 sister Mary Ann born 1827 Lower Minto.

      Next step is to obtain a transcript of her birth cert. I feel there must have been a wee bit of a relationship overlap to say the least whilst Thomas was languishing in Liverpool insane asylum! His death cert has occupation – LUNATIC!

      I had a quick look on nsw BDM and saw the 1833 Jane Benson death but no mother is given. Where is the info from? It could be another Benson. I found Glen Mc Kenzie’s family tree on Rootsweb 2002 – World Connect a good guide to Samuels that got me going.  @   GLNMCK@HOTMAIL.COM 1927760   There are some inaccuracies eg Henry Samuels senior place of birth.

 
MARILYN ADDED THIS INFORMATION REGARDING HER DESCENT FROM SARAH ANN BENSON AND HER SECOND HUSBAND GEORGE MOORE:
  • I am descended from their 3rd child, Henry Thomas Moore who married Ellen McPhee, then their 2nd child Leslie Francis Moore who married Gladys May Robinson, then their 1st child Gladys Ivy Moore who married my father, Allen William Roberts. Mum and Dad only lived 3 streets away from each other in Lilyfield and knew each other from childhood. You would know that George was the 1st son of George Moore, convict of the ‘Asia’ 1822 and Ann Tracey, who came free on ‘ Elizabeth ’ 1818.  They married in 1827 and George was born in 1828.
  • Thanks for the new info and Penny has raised a few questions actually.  I hadn’t noticed but I have a child, Jane Benson, registered born and died in 1833 to Hannah and Thomas Benson, besides the child Penny mentioned, Hannah, born in 1832 (parents Hannah and Henry Samuels).  I hadn’t noticed the cross over of dates.  Will have to investigate further.  Perhaps ‘Jane’ and ‘Hannah’ are the same child?  Is it possible to ask Penny if she has anything on ‘Hannah’ except for a birth? I don’t have anything further on Thomas Benson’s death, only the BDM registered in Liverpool .  If Penny has a certificate she knows more than I at this time.  Of course, back in the early days asylums were also classified for use as ‘benevolent’, for not just the ‘ insane’ but also for people with invalidism or ill-health, or as paupers.  A cert would give some idea of his ‘condition’.

LYNNE WRITES : Sarah Ann was married in 1851 to Peter Mark Ready. They then go to Victoria in 1852 with their baby daughter. Hannah being only one year younger than Sarah it does seem likely there  is a connection in the Victorian experience. They lived in White Hills and then Back Creek near Amherst ( ah! this then became known as Talbot in 1861) It was there in 1862 that Peter Mark ready fell down a mine shaft and died.

We had always pictured Sarah as alone in Victoria with her 5 children but I doubt that after reading Penny’s emails. She married George Moore very quickly and returned to Sydney. Peter Mark was also known as Hogan ( the 2nd husband of his mother)

MORE ABOUT HANNAH

Two descendants have now made contact – Marilyn and Penny. See their comments on previous entries.

 

Hannah then is landed in Sydney. Two years later on 15 march 1826 she is listed with these names HANNAH (HITCHINGS, HITCHINS, HITCHERS OR HUTCHINS ) as a spinster of Parramatta when she has the permission of Governor Darling to marry THOMAS BENSON, Batchelor at St Johns Church, Parramatta. The ceremony was carried out by the assistant chaplain , Thomas Hassell and was witnessed by John Baker and Christabella Ferguson.

On 4 may 1827, at lower Minto, a daughter was born. MARY A BENTON ( SIC)

(Phil Ready cites vol1 no 7991, vol2 no25 RGI)

Hannah was granted a ticket of leave in 1829 ( 29/1007 reel 913 AONSW) and two years later on 3 August 1831 gave birth to a second daughter  SARAH ANN BENSON who was baptised in St Phillips Church Sydney on the 5 November 1831. ( vol 15 no 308 RGI)

Nine months later, Thomas Benson died in the Lunatic Asylum at Liverpool leaving Hannah with five year old Mary Ann and one year old Sarah Ann to rear. On 23 August after a simple ceremony , Thomas was buried. ( Vol 16 1562 RGI) 

The same year Hannah gave birth to another daughter whom she named Hannah, this time the father was Henry Samuels whose surname the child bore.

HANNAH HITCHINS

OLD BAILEY

Hannah Hitchins  ( Hitchens,Hutchens etc) was a native of Islington, London. She was just  over 4ft 10in tall. Her hair was brown, her eyes grey and they described her skin as being sallow and pock marked. (Brothers Indents) . Having been sentenced to death at the Old Bailey, Hannah was instead transported to The Colony. On December 6th, 1823, a complement of women prisoners and several passengers were aboard the transport, BROTHERS, and ready to depart. A light sail was set and BROTHERS pulled out from the pier at the Downs. She set her sails and glided out of the harbour.  ( letter to Sir Thomas Brisbane from James Hall, Surgeon Superintendent of THE BROTHERS 4/1774 reel 2662 pp 41-50 and 4/4009A AONSW)

According to Hall, soon after leaving England, six of the women conspired to murder him and actually formed a mutiny in the prison in which he was knocked down, beaten and kicked.

It was afterwards discovered that the First Mate was involved. According to Hall,the Mate had conspired with the women and had actually hit him and rescued one of the mutineers, whom the master, Charles Motley, Hall and the Second Mate had seized. He also stated that Mate James Thompson Meach had offered the mutineers a bottle of rum if they would ” jump his bl—- guts out” Said he would blow Hall’s brains out;throw him overboard in a gale or bribe some men in Sydney to throw him over The Rocks.

It transpired that James Meath had made a duplicate key to the prison and had taken one of the prisoners , twenty one year old Mary Smith to bed with him. He has also directed the Third Mate to let a prisoner out of the gaol for the purposes of prostitution.

Hall stated that most of the prisoners had been very well behaved except for a few whose bad conduct he believed could be wholly attributed to the influence of James Meath and his associates. These never exceeded more than six or seven of the women, in spite of Meath’s efforts to seduce all of the women and crew to engage in mutual and unrestrained intercourse, although a number of the crew had also entered the prison secretly to enjoy the women.

One of the prisoners, nineteen old Ann Bullen, had risked her life to warn hall of the conspiracy against him.  The ship arrived at Hobart Town on 15 April 1824 and after spending ten days there, sailed for Sydney on the 25th. On arrival in Sydney, the Cook, William Lovell, had also broken into the prison for the purposes of prostitution. James Meath was tried in Sydney at the Police Office where he admitted to using the women for prostitution.

Charles Motley, Master of THE BROTHERS, requested that Sir Thomas Brisbane allow him to discharge three other members of his crew as well as James Meath. They were William Meath ( Brother of James),  who had taken no part in the events Aboard whatsoever, William Lovell, the Cook, and John Phillips who wished to remain in the Colony.

TWO BABIES were born during this voyage but both died. Three other children, two male passengers and one of the convicts Mary Partridge also died.

Hall wrote a report on the state of the prisoners . He noted that the majority of the forty women were aged between nineteen and twenty seven and except for one who died of consumption,all were in good health. Most were apparently well behaved but six were entered as being LOOSE WOMEN. Among the latter was HANNAH HITCHINS.

more to come : 20 May 2008

RESEARCHED AND RECORDED BY PHILIP READY. MANY THANKS.

earlysydneyw994h706

 

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE OLD BAILEY 

    PAINTINGS OF THE SEA – TASMANIA

    ADB BIO OF JAMES HALL ( A DIFFERENT SLANT ON THE STORY OF HANNAH’S SHIP )

PHOTOS FROM LONDON COURTESY JON SANDERS

RE HANNAH HITCHENS ( HUTCHENS)

St Andrews Holborn is the scene of Hannah Hutchens (Hitchens) theft. The church is really the only thing left that would have been there at the time – but is a very nice church with the two curious statues on either side of the door. I haven’t come across anything like them anywhere else. St Andrews is one of half a dozen streets that radiate out from Holborn Circus – most of the streets heading south (including St Andrews) are almost totally modern but those heading north give a little more sense of what it may have been like.

It has always worried me in London that I can’t quite get my bearings. This time I realised that it’s largely because there is a big modern city that still follows a totally chaotic medieval street plan. Holborn is just outside of the old city as defined by the old city wall but it is still a very old part of town.

Jon Sanders.

ST A2 ST ANDREWSSTA5 STA6 

STA 3STAA4

RE THOMAS BENSON. 

Gravel Lane is the scene of thomas Benson’s crime. There is even less to see here but it is probably an even older part of town – indicated by the name of the area Aldgate (or old gate). It is in the east, not far from the Tower of London but suffered badly during the blitz. It is an area that is one of the business centres of London and I have included a photo of one of London’s ‘iconic’ new buildings, the Gherkin, which is only a block or so away (London blocks are usually much shorter than blocks in other cities because of the previously mentioned chaotic medieval street plan – shorter and seldom straight)

Jon Sanders

ALDGATE ALDGATE2 ALDGATE3

THANKS TO JON SANDERS FOR THE PHOTOGRAPHS AND COMMENTARY. MAY 2008.

HANNAH HITCHENS AND THOMAS BENSON WERE THE PARENTS OF SARAH ANN BENSON WHO MARRIED PETER MARK READY AND THEN GEORGE MOORE. SARAH WAS THE MOTHER OF PETER READY WHOSE DAUGHTER JESSIE SARAH MARRIED WILLIAM BELL. THEY WERE THE PARENTS OF JACK, JEAN, JOYCE AND BETTY BELL.

 

LYNNE BELL SANDERS › Dashboard — WordPress

SARAH AND GEORGE MOORE.

SARAH AND GEORGE MOORE. 19TH CENTURY

 

IN 1988 , PHILIP READY  DISTRIBUTED A FAMILY HISTORY OF THE READY FAMILY TO THE MEMBERS OF HIS FAMILY. MUCH WORK HAD BEEN PUT INTO THIS AND HE ISSUED IT IN THE FORM OF 45 PAGE BOOKLET WHICH HE CALLED ” READY OR NOT” . I HAVE JUST ACQUIRED HIS CONTACT DETAILS AND WILL WRITE AND ASK FOR PERMISSION TO PUT IT ONLINE.

IN THE MEANTIME HERE ARE SOME OF THE FAMILY DETAILS WHICH HE SO PAINSTAKINGLY RESEARCHED  WITH HIS WIFE LOIS IN PRE-INTERNET DAYS WHEN THIS WAS NO SMALL TASK.

 

SARAH WAS BORN SARAH ANN BENSON. 

Her parents were THOMAS BENSON and HANNAH HITCHINS ( HUTCHINS. HUTCHINGS) and both had come to Australia as convicts. 

THOMAS BENSON – 1802 -1832

HANNAH HITCHINS – 1803 -1864.

THOMAS BENSON

Thomas was a black-haired , 5’3″ tall, brown complexioned twenty year old  maker of steel toys when he was brought in the 4 December 1822 Middlesex Gaol Delivery to Court. Thomas was tried and sentenced to transportation for life to The Colony of NSW. He ha been apprehended on 30 October 1822 when he attempted to steal , along with two others, five shirts valued at 20 shillings and two handkerchiefs valued at 2/-  . These were the goods of one Sarah Spencer. Sarah Spencer lived with her mother who was a laundress in Vinegar Lane , Commercial Road, London.  The three men had been standing nearby  at about 7.45 pm when Sarah stepped out of a shop in Gravel Road with a bundle of of clothes  and a pair of shoes.

One man grabbed the bundle of clothes and the second had run off close behind whilst the prisoner, Thomas, had held Sarah for a couple of minutes to aid the escape of the other two. When Sarah had screamed for assistance Thomas had also run off after the other two but had been apprehended before he reached them. ( Old Bailey Trials. Reel 30 No. 28 page 12 ML . These can now be read online. )

In April of 1823, Thomas was one of 172 convicts from the Leviathan and York Hulks who were placed aboard the OCEAN II.

According to James McTernan, Surgeon and Superintendent aboard the Ocean II, the 85 or so convicts from the YORK Hulk were of the most unsavoury character: ” who had made attempts to escape , in which some had perished; who had attacked the clergyman in the performance of his functions and who had declared  their determination to take possession of the OCEAN II on her passage to NSW. Mc Ternan also stated that the men of the Leviathan ” were men of good conduct and fair character. “

 

HANNAH HITCHINS

On 25 June 1823, 16 year old Hannah Hutchins was tried at the Old Bailey  for stealing from a dwelling place  and sentenced to death. Apparently this was later commuted to transportation for life to NSW. 

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

911. MARIA WILLIAMS and HANNAH HUTCHINS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , at St. Andrew, Holborn , thirty-three yards of poplin, value 2 l., the goods of Miles Metcalf , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES WILSON . I am shopman to Miles Metcalf , a linendraper , who lives in High Holborn . On the 20th of May, between six and seven o’clock in the evening, I was called down from tea, and found the prisoners in the shop, and as they were going out, I said I suspected they had something which did not belong to them; Hutchins denied it – Williams desired her to give it up if she had anything; she still persisted that she had nothing. I sent for a constable, and before he came Hutchins took the poplin from under her clothes, and gave it to me – it measured thirty-two yards, and is worth exactly 40 s., it cost us 1 s. 4 d. a yard – we should sell it for 5 s. or 6 s. more. Williams begged hard to be let go, and said she would take the print away, and pay the money if we would let them go; she said nothing about the poplin. Hutchins said she had never seen it after she had given it up – she could not account how it got under her petticoats. They at first said they had not enough to pay for the print, which came to 8 s. 3 d., but 14 s. was found on one of them.

JOHN LATIMER CLARK . I am servant to Mr. Metcalf; the prisoners came to the shop, and both asked to see a printed cotton; I saw Bow the shopman who is not here, shew them a great many. I was behind the counter opposite to them, about a yard from them; they were about ten minutes looking at them, and did not like any of them. I saw Hutchins convey a piece of figured poplin under her petticoat; she rather stooped to do it; Williams was close to bet, she did not put it on the side Williams stood, but Williams came on the other side of her at the time, and held up a printed cotton, while she was doing it, and asked me the price of it. I immediately ran up stairs and told Wilson, who came down with me, they were than paying 1 s. deposit for a print – they were going out, and he said, he thought they had something which did not belong to them, Hutchins denied it. I left them with Wilson, while I fetched Collins, the officer.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a constable. I was fetched. Wilson gave me the poplin and the prisoner’s in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS’S Defence. I was coming along Holborn, and met Hutchins very much in liquor. She asked me to go with her to buy a gown, and I went with her, not knowing that she meant to steal.

HUTCHINS – GUILTY – DEATH . Aged 16.

WILLIAMS – NOT GUILTY .

On December 6,1823, the complement of women prisoners and several passengers were aboard the ship BROTHERS and ready to depart.  Setting a light sail the BROTHERS pulled out from the pier at The Downs, set her sails and glided out of the harbour bound direct for the Colony and Hobart Town. ( Letter to Sir Thomas Brisbane from James Hall, Superintendent of the BROTHERS. 4/1774 Reel 2662 pp 41-50 and 4/4009A  AONSW)

MORE TO COME. 10/5/08

 

LYNNE SANDERS – JOYCE BELL(SANDERS) – JESSIE SARAH READY(BELL) – GEORGE PETER READY – SARAH BENSON/READY/MOORE