Category Archives: ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS WITH THANKS

TO ALL THE PEOPLE

OLD GOVERNMENT HOUSE WINDSOR

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CAWB – Save Windsor from the RTA
Some interesting photosWe have been sent some photos of Old Government House, Windsor that are new to us.

They are particularly interesting because they are the last taken as it was demolished in the early 1920’s. What is of particular interest is that it shows how it was built and some interior glimpses. Unlike stone and brick structures there is almost nothing existing from the 1700’s built of wood and wattle and daub, let alone an important building such as this.

What is extraordinary is it survived termites, fire and flood in this hostile new environment for about 130 years and by looking at the pictures could have been fully restored if the will was there.

If you look closely at the walls you can see the plaster finishing over the wattle timber straps, much of it still in place. The final shot of it being torn down reveals the ceilings of wooden boards. The front exterior shot shows amazingly the original wooden shingle roof which had been accidentally preserved under a replacement tin outer skin and only revealed in demolition.

One can only imagine the dozens of major figures of our colonial history that rested, ate, conversed and lived under its roof as they planned our new country.

It is a tragedy that this prime example of building techniques at the birth of our nation was systematically destroyed. This was done in spite of protests at the time to council.

As one looks at the torn down end wall we can see revealed the still solid cedar roof structure. One senses a repeat performance for the Jolly Frog Hotel.

The cultural vandalism demonstrated here robs us all of our shared cultural memory for short term gains and long term loss. The saga of the Jolly Frog is yet to begin but it is should become a symbolic marker that such disrespect for heritage ends here.

We, the guardians of our culture, are offended and degraded by such activity and do not regard expedience, greed, ignorance and laziness as valid justification for robbing us of a unique legacy to hand onto our great grandchildren – its our responsibility to resist and win.

CAWB - Save Windsor from the RTA's photo.

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FROM BRIAN AHEARNTHE BOOK OF THE ATLAS AND MORE

Aug 16, 6:05 pm

Beyond the Sea two volumes copy

Hi Lynne,
Thanks for your kind offer.
II can send you a colour shot of the books and the Log book of the Atlas. Not sure if your site can accommodate the size?

Kind regards
Brian
Here is a brief outline:
On the morning of November 29, 1801, a heavy wooden wagon, lumbered through the streets of Cork and moved slowly in the direction of the port of Cobh. Absorbing the bumps in the springless cart was a young sworn United Irishman named Murtagh Ahern and his two brothers John and Michael. They had been sentenced to suffer death for rebellious outrages and the brutal murders of all the male members of a Tithe-Proctor’s family at Croom in County Limerick.
Their commuted sentences to life ‘beyond the sea’ would see them chained below the deck of the ‘Death ship’ Atlas and spend 220 agonising days amongst sick, hungry and disease ridden inmates. It would be the worst voyage in the history of Irish convict transportation to the infant colony of New South Wales. Sixty-five convicts, including his brother John, would join the sufferers on their voyage to the deep.
At 2 o’clock on July 6, 1802 Murtagh arrived in Port Jackson with his brother Michael. They would suffer, but survive, the most turbulent times in the history of Australia. Murtagh would marry English convict Mary Abbey. They would produce seventeen children and become one of the pioneer families of Liverpool. He worked for Lieutenant Edward Lord in Van Diemen’s Land and under Lieutenant-Governor David Collins. In 1810 he received a pardon from Governor Lachlan Macquarie. He became a constable, a hotelier and a prominent farmer on the Georges River.
This is the story of an ordinary Irishman who arrived in Sydney, his neck and ankles locked in heavy irons and chains, with only a tattered shirt and trousers to protect him from the extreme elements. Penniless, sick, hungry and treated as a beast of burden, he was classed as an inferior being, one on the scrap heap of humanity. Murtagh had been and continued to be confronted by some of the most extraordinary circumstances and times in our history, yet he showed immense courage and compassion and overcame his predicament to create a large family of many proud ‘native Australians’. He lived up to his family motto:

Per ardua surgo
I rise through difficulties

This book gives a sweep of Irish history from Murtagh’s ancestor Brian Boru the High King of Ireland, the dark days of Oliver Cromwell, the horrors and privations of the 1798 Irish rebellion to the discovery and founding of Australia. It details the struggles of succeeding Governors and the characters who made Australia what it is today. The second volume also covers the early Irish family records of Murtagh and Mary’s family in Mileham. The background of their seventeen children is also included.
• There are two volumes with a limited special first edition binding.
• Each book is hard-bound in green leather and blocked in gold.
• There are 1,300 pages with 753 illustrations, Including a bibliography and index.
Separate to the two volumes is the log book of the convict transport ‘Atlas’. A total of 363 pages,

SHOTS OF MULL AND TOBERMORY

HOME AND/OR DEPARTURE POINT FOR JENNETT MCLEAN AND OTHER HIGHLAND SCOTS

IMAGES TAKEN OCTOBER 2011.

28.09.11 to mull 03

THE CASTLE OF THE MCLEANS ON MULL.

28.09.11 x mull 09

TOBERMORY.

1838
The BRILLIANT brought Scottish Bounty Immigrants including :
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL( later to become known as GRANNY BELL of LAURIETON, wife of the Invalid Mr John Bell. ) Janet was born in 1831 so she was only a child of 6-7 when she came. Her parents were JOHN MCLEAN and GRACE MCINNES(McGuiness)

A large body of emigrants sailed from Tobermory on the 27th of September for New South Wales. The vessel was the Brilliant, and its size and splendid fittings were greatly admired. “the people to be conveyed by this vessel are decidedly the most valuable that have ever left the shores of Great Britain; they are all of excellent moral character, and from their knowledge of agriculture, and management of sheep and cattle, must prove a most valuable acquisition to a colony like New South Wales.” The Rev. Mr Macpherson, of Tobermory, preached a farewell sermon before the party sailed. The total number of emigrants was 322, made up as follows:—From Ardnamurchan and Strontian, 105; Coll and Tiree, 104; Mull and lona, 56; Morven, 25; Dunoon, 28; teachers, 2; surgeons, 2. A visitor from New South Wales presented as many of the party as he met with letters of introduction, and expressed himself highly gratified with the prospect of having so valuable an addition to the colony. A Government agent superintended the embarkation

29.09.11 x mull 05

29.09.11 x tobermory 17

29.09.11 x tobermory 29

SAMUELS and WHALLEY. from Cheryl Lean.

Hello Pamela & Tracey! I am downline from Henry’s brother (James) and have gathered quite a lot on this side of my family tree. I believe that Jane Whalley died suddenly of heart failure on 20 Dec 1903 at home in Lambert Street, Camperdown – aged 58 (b: c. 1845). Judging by the many memorial tributes from her children in 1904 & 1907, she was a much loved mother & wife of William. William placed his one & only tribute to his wife in 1904, not long before he died of a long and painful illness, on 21 Jan 1904 at 15 Lambert Street, Camperdown.
I found 2 possible births for Jane Whalley. 1) 12 Oct 1845 Padiham, Lancashire to John & Selina. 2) 1 Dec 1844 Blackburn, Lancashire to David & Elizabeth. The NSW BDM Death register has ‘WILLIAM’ as Jane’s father, but that could refer to husband William Samuels. If you purchase the marriage certificate of William & Jane, it ‘MAY’ show her parent’s names. Hope this helps, Cheryl (Qld)

HURRELL FAMILY REUNION 3 SEPTEMBER 2011

Philip Andrew Hurrell Just to let all to know that we are organizing a Hurrell family reunion on the 3rd of September which will be held at Comboyne showground starting at @11.00am. We would love to meet as many descendants of Lucy Jane Sanders who is the sister of my Great Grandfather Thomas Dennis Hurrell. if you need any info on the day please contact me on 0451308018. Cheers and hope to meet many of you there, Phil.

Map picture

NEW YEARS EN MASSE

These first Covers are so odd that I am not posting them. I shall instead wrap up with the WOMENS WEEKLY NEW YEAR COVER for 1949 – year of my own birth. It’s a ripper.

NYThe Australian Women's Weekly , Saturday 1 January 1949,

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47507399

The Australian Women’s Weekly Saturday 4 January 1947

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46944938

1948 ‘The Australian WOMEN’S WEEKLY.’, The Australian Women’s Weekly , 3 January 1948

584 CANTERBURY ROAD HURLSTONE PARK SYDNEY

HOME OF J.G. SANDERS AND FAMILY.

That’s where I spent my babyhood before father Bruce Sanders, built 27 Paxton Avenue Belmore.

Just been sent a Domain Link with the property for sale on 2010.

Here are some images.

20 584 new canterbury road 1925-30 584 canterbury road

BACK THEN

2010

0a53433f-ee6f-4792-ad20-77d826b42a04_FS 2dc6c3e6-4568-4e94-88d0-4bfdb9827743_FS
79f86a61-9088-44c1-9152-87c6f2231de1_FS

That’s her as she is today according to Domain.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT WITH THANKS : MARK ROGERS.

From MARK ROGERS , a descendant of CHRISTINA (BELL) QUIRK), I have received images and documents which I shall post A.S.A.P. Many thanks to you , Mark.

JAMES BELL.

____________

James BELL 26

Born: about 1808 in Glasgow, Scotland

Married: to Wilhelmina McLEOD on 29 Sep 1840 at Scots Church Patterson NSW

Died: 6 Feb 1852 in the Williams River area, near Dungog NSW

Buried: 13 Feb 1852 at Anleys Flat, Dungog NSW

Children: see Wilhelmina McLEOD (no 27) for details.

James Bell was convicted of housebreaking in Glasgow on 9 April 1830 and sentenced to 7 years transportation. He had no prior convictions. He was 21 at the time of his trial and was living with his sister (name unknown) in her house at Gallowgate.

James had broken into a cellar in a sinkflat of a tenement on the east side of Glassford St Glasgow on 21 March 1830 (a Sunday) in the company of one other. Apparently he was attempting to break into the stationery warehouse of Russell and McArthur on the floor above. His accomplice escaped but he was captured and subdued (beaten about the head by a woman with a crutch). He maintained he was unaware of the second person in the cellar and that he had been looking for a “Necessary” at the time. An auger was found in the ceiling and his jacket had two skeleton keys and a breakfast knife. The police statement said that Bell was “a bad character but not quite habit repute a thief”. He was to be detained in the Tollbooth, Glasgow until removed for transportation.

On arrival in NSW on the “York” on 17 Jan 1831 he was described as Protestant, Reads (but not Write), single labourer, 5’6”, dark ruddy pock-pitted complexion, dark brown hair, grey eyes. He was assigned to G. Townsend of Hunter River.

George Townsend, to whom James was assigned, was a major landowner in the Patterson district and it appears that James continued to work for him right through until the time of his marriage. Townsend arrived in Sydney in 1826 and was granted 2560 acres between Patterson and the Allyn River. This property became the Trevallyn Estate. In 1831 the property was described by William Edward Riley in his Journal:

“A settler of four years standing, cannot say much in favour of Mr T’s establishment, his hut being small, plastered only in part& without a single glass window to admit light and keep out the rain… He has raised a large quantity of tobacco last year & has at this time upward of three tons of rolled leaf in the press.”

Townsend continued to grow large quantities of tobacco and experimenting with other cask crops including cotton and grapes (neither successful). In 1830 he had 34 convicts and one free man. In 1838 Townsend had 25 convicts, 6 men free by servitude and one Ticket of Leave man, working 50 cleared acres, 40 acres under cultivation and with 7 horses, 130 cattle and 655 sheep. In 1834 Townsend purchased John Webber’s farm (Penshurst) for 1000 Pounds. But financial problems were just around the corner – by early as 1836 Townsend was disposing of, or mortgaging some of his land and by 1841 Townsend was insolvent and was forced to sell Penshurst.

James was granted a Ticket of Leave for the District of Patterson on 1 July 1835 (ref 35/372). This was surrendered and torn up when he obtained his Certificate of Freedom dated 9 August 1838 (ref 38/98). In the 1838 Muster he is recorded at Patterson.

Having served his sentence he was free to marry without approval, which he did in September 1840 to Wilhelmina McLeod at Scots Church, Patterson. James was living at Penshurst at the time. The Minister of Scots Church was Rev. William Ross and it appears that Wilhelmina was a member of the congregation there. Witnesses were Donald McLeod (Wilhelmina’s brother) and Mary McMaster. The current St Anne’s Church Patterson was not opened until 27 Aug 1842 by Rev. Ross, so it appears they were married in an earlier, cruder church.

Probably shortly after his marriage he would have been forced to leave “Penshurst” due to George Townsend’s financial difficulties. Family tradition has it that he farmed for a time at Barties Swamp (near Seaham). The “Gloucester & Raymond Terrace Examiner” on 1 June 1842 reported that Mr Bartie was draining an extensive swamp to cultivate corn and was paying the highest market price for grain from his tennants.

But soon the family moved to “Mulconda” near Bandon Grove. Here the first of his seven children was born. He would have worked at “Mulconda” as a tennant farmer, housing his family in a wooden hut at the base of the hill to the east of the current house on the property. Interestingly, “Mulconda” also grew tobacco, so he may have been able to apply some of his experience with the crop from “Trevallyn”.

By at least 1850 the family had moved to “Mt Pleasant” only about 10 miles distant near Salisbury (and close to the Allyn River property he first arrived at. He farmed in the district as a tennant farmer until his death.

The Maitland Mercury of Saturday 14 Feb 1852 reported that “on Friday last, after a severe illness, Mr James Bell, a respectable settler died, & yesterday the funeral was attended by nearly all the neighbours.” It goes on to describe a serious accident involving the carriage carrying James’ casket.

COMPILED BY MARK ROGERS.

HURRELLS

HURRELL SISTERS COURTESY OF MERILYN HURRELL AND HER NAN.

Hurrell Sisters

COMPARE THIS ONE WITH THE ONE IN MY FAMILY WITH GRANDMA SANDERS AKA LUCY JANE HURRELL. ( FRONT LEFT IN MERILYN’S PHOTO. SECOND FROM RIGHT IN MINE.)

 

GRANDMA AND THE AUNTS 001

_____________________________________________________

Hurrell Clan - Thomas Dennis and Isabella Kerr possible

HURRELL CLAN.

Twins photo WITH BLACKBERRY SANDERS

BLACKBERRY SANDERS AND ‘ THE TWINS’.

SITES TO SEE : THE TIME OF ANN MORAN AND THE HERCULES.

http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1802.htm

http://www.convictconnections.org.au/shipsA-I.html

http://www.danbyrnes.com.au/blackheath/ships3.htm

http://www.historyservices.com.au/nsw_colonial_chronology_1770_1803.htm

http://www.jstor.org/pss/27516597

http://www.mcginleyclan.org/irishslaves.htm

 

EXTRACT FROM http://www.ulladulla.info/historian/1804deaths.html

Deaths 1804 NSW & Norfolk Island Early Colonial History Research and Indexed by Historian Cathy Dunn. 

Castle Hill

HUGHES

James

1804

SG 19 Jan 1806. Last week a native informed Tarlington, a settler, that the skeleton of a white man, with a musket and tin kettle laying beside him, had been seen under the first ridge of the mountains. The settler accompanied the native, and found the skeleton, and as described, the bones of which being very long, leads to a more than probable conjecture, that the remains are those of James Hughes, who absconded from Castle Hill the 15th of February 1804, in company with 15 others, most of whom had recently arrived in the Hercules, on the ridiculous pretext of finding a road to China, but in reality to commit the most unheard of depredations; the consequences of which were, that the whole except Hughes were shortly apprehended, and 13 capitally convicted before the Criminal Court, of whom two were executed, and 11 pardoned. Hughes was an able active man, well known in Ireland during the rebellion that existed in that country for his abominable depravities; and it is hoped his miserable end will warn the thoughtless, inexperienced and depraved against an inclination to exchange the comfort and security derived from honest labour, to depart from which can only lead to the most fatal consequences

Parramatta

HUMES

Samuel

Mar 1804

Leader in the 1804 Battle of Vinegar Hill – rebellion executed at Parramatta and hung in chains, Convict Hercules I 1802

________________________________________________________

 

Revolution, counter-revolution, and union

By Jim Smyth

PAUL FERGUS AND ANN MORAN AND JOHN CURTIS

 

Dear Lynne
I also am descended from John Curtis and Ann Moran through their daughter Catherine and George Eccleston. I am their third great-grandson.
In two weeks, my wife and I will be visiting Ireland and I am hoping that I might be able to do a bit more research on the ground about Ann as she certainly seems to have been a remarkable woman.
I am trying to resolve a number of discrepancies between various items of information in my possession.
The best information seems to indicate that she was convicted in Trim in Co Meath in 1797 (coincidentally the year that John arrived in Sydney)in connection with political activities and that she was held in jail in Ireland for five years before being transported to Australia on the Hercules in November 1801, arriving here on 26 June 1802. One record in the State Library implies that the prisoners on the Hercules were convicted for offences in the “late rebellion” which can only mean the United Irishmen in 1798 from the context.
I should be grateful for any information you can provide that might assist with my research in Ireland.
While visiting my son and his family in London after Ireland, I intend to return to Bristol to undertake more research into John Curtis. I obtained a lot of information 18 months ago including records of the marriage of John Curtis and Jane Purrier and of the baptisms of all 11 of their children in St Philip and St Jacobs Church in Cheese Lane, Bristol. From these records, I managed to visit the three streets in which they lived at the times of the births of different children. For most of their married life they lived in Cheese Lane, near the Church. I suspect that as his accountancy practice failed and he got into financial difficulties, the family was forced to move to less salubrious accommodation.
I also managed to obtain copies of one press report of John’s conviction and death sentence at Gloucester Assizes for coining. The judge must have been feeling sympathy for John because another man convicted and sentenced to death at the same sittings was immediately taken for “execution of the sentence” but the judge commuted John’s sentence to transportation for life.
After returning to Australia in April 2008, I managed to locate descendants of John’s and Jane’s youngest child in New York.
Paul Fergus

JOHN READY c 1790-1831 PT 2.

Whilst John Ready journeyed out, Governor Macquarie had been making tremendous advances in the affairs of the Colony and had worked hard to better the lot of all. The new towns of Windsor, Castlereagh, Wilberforce and Pittown that he had created were going well, but the Gentry were upset by his kindness and thoughtfulness to the emancipists whom he considered to be the backbone of the future nation. He was also having problems with the 73rd Regiment and asked that it be removed complete for instead of upholding the law, it was like its predecessor the NSW Rum Corps, flouting it. (Macquarie His Life, Adventures and Times. A. M. Ellis.)

Drought had continued all through the Summer and Autumn of early 1814, but by April the road to Windsor was finished and the Turnpike from Sydney to Liverpool almost completed, with all able bodied men having to contribute labour in building the section near the properties, which would benefit them when completed. 

It was into this scene, with food becoming ever scarcer as the drought continued and the Colony awaiting the shipment of grain from India, that JOHN READY and the other prisoners from the THREE BEES entered.

Taken to the prisoners’ barracks they were divided into groups, allocated to Parramatta, Windsor or Liverpool and sent there under guard. John , travelling along the newly completed road was sent to WINDSOR and put to work in the Government Dairy. Whether this was just coincidence, or because his mother, JOHANNAH READY, worked in Government House is unknown, but he was receiving rations there in 1814 (Windsor Ration Book loc. A 803 pp 56,66,116 ML) and in the same year was mentioned as being Overseer at the Government Dairy.

Towards the end of that desperate year, whilst Cox was building his road over the mountains, the rains came and the crops which such a short time before looked doomed, began to look as if they would give a reasonable harvest. Things commenced to improve for all, grass finally started to grow again, the cows to give more milk and the beef cattle to fill out.

In the SYDNEY GAZETTE of the 21st September 1816 and again in 1817, it is recorded that a letter had arrived for JOHN. Regretfully there is no record of who sent them or where they came from but the family in Ireland was obviously keeping in touch as moves were later made by his mother to bring his brother Philip and family out to Australia. On his next visit to Sydney, John was able to see the advances made to the Town for the new Hospital was rising in Macquarie Street under the direction of FRANCIS GREENWAY and built at no cost to the Government.

 

For the next two years John went about his business at the Dairy without attracting adverse attention and on the 30th April 1819 there appeared an entry in the LAND OFFICE Records.

 

DOWNEY TO READY

Deed Poll bearing the date the 15th day February 1819 under the hand and seal of PATRICK DOWNEY of prospect, settler whereby for the considerations therein mentioned he, the said PATRICK DOWNEY.

Did absolutely bargain, sell, assign, transfer and make over to JOHN READY of PARRAMATTA all his right, title and interest of five houses and tenements, situate in GEORGE ST PARRAMATTA, formerly the Property of THOMAS PEARCE purchased by him the said PATRICK DOWNEY at Public Auction which said houses and Tenements are more particularly described in a certain assignment dated 30th day November 1818 from  ROBERT JENKINS to him the said PATRICK DOWNEY. 

On the 31st August John was granted a pardon by Governor Macquarie (Pardons Reel 771 AO) and on 4th February 1820 at the age of thirty, was joined at ST JOHN’S PARRAMATTA, in the bonds of Holy Matrimony to Elizabeth, the 17 year old daughter of JOHN CURTIS and ANN MORAN who lived nearby at Toongabbie. The ceremony was conducted by JOHN CROSS with MICHAEL AND MARY DWYEE as witnesses. ( St Johns Register ML).

As a married man owning twenty head of cattle, John applied for a grant of 50 acres of land to start a farm of his own. The grant was made in 1821 and listed in the 12 May edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE.

 

On the 31st August John was granted a pardon by Governor Macquarie (Pardons Reel 771 AO) and on 4th February 1820 at the age of thirty, was joined at ST JOHN’S PARRAMATTA, in the bonds of Holy Matrimony to Elizabeth, the 17 year old daughter of JOHN CURTIS and ANN MORAN who lived nearby at Toongabbie. The ceremony was conducted by JOHN CROSS with MICHAEL AND MARY DWYEE as witnesses. ( St Johns Register ML).

In the 1825 Muster, John is listed as being a landholder at CASTLE HILL but he is recorded as supplying fresh meat to the Commissariat at Parramatta on 24 February 1821 and Pork on 24th March 1821 so must have had access to some land in the meantime. 

John and Elizabeth’s marriage however was going through a stormy time with the unhappy Elizabeth eventually running away, for in the 15 February edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE a notice appeared warning anyone against giving credit to his wife ELIZABETH READY, formerly Curtis, on his account as she had run away from home without any just cause or provocation.

John was again mentioned in the SYDNEY GAZETTE of 8th JANUARY 1823 as having supplied meat to the Government Stores.

With the income from the property acquired from PATRICK DOWNEY earlier, John decided to expand his interests and on the 25th April 1825, a notice from the Surveyor-General’s Office appeared in the AUSTRALIAN that a grant of land was ready for delivery to JOHN REIDY(sic) and FRANCIS PENDERGRASY. ( Francis had married John’s mother Johannah the previous year.)

READY OR NOT – FOREWORD

  0 5 julia & george ready 1880s

‘GEORGE’ PETER READY

M 15/11/1882

JULIA JACKSON

0 4 george ready snr 1880s

  CHILDREN OF GEORGE AND JULIA READY DATE BIRTH DATE DEATH
1 UNNAMED 7/11/1883 7/11/1883
2 MABEL 25/9/1884 ????????
3 GEORGE PETER MARK 18/10/1885 25/10/1955
4 FRANK 8/5/87 9/12/87
5 SYDNEY 11/5/1888 4/5/1964
6 ETHEL ELIZABETH MAY 20/9/89 12/2/1890
7 WILLIAM HENRY 1/11/1890 18/2/1964
8 JESSIE SARAH 30/5/1892 18/12/1971
9 FREDERICK BENSON 7/9/1894 10/8/1895
10 ESMA JACKSON 12/7/1896 29/8/1898
11 ARTHUR CHARLES 10/7/1899 29/3/1953
12 ALFRED JAMES 29/4/1901 10/8/1954
  20 9 flora & syd ready 0 8 esma & jessie ready c1898 10 9 arthur front L alf back R
  FLORA AND SYD READY – PARENTS OF PHIL ESMA AND JESSIE READY APP 1898 REDFERN ARTHUR FR L ALF BACK R
   10 11 alf arthur mick & ..scan0013 10 3 jessie ready 1915  10 10 bill & em ready
  ALF READY , ARTHUR READY , MICK BELL AND MORE AT LAURIETON JESSIE SARAH READY BILL AND EM READY

 

THIS IS THE FOREWORD PHIL READY WROTE FOR HIS BOOK – “READY OR NOT “. I AM REPRODUCING IT FOLLOWING HIS EMAIL RE MY PUBLISHING HIS FINDINGS. PERMISSION GRANTED.

When I decided in 1981 to research the history of my family, i believed that we were on my father’s side, descended from an average English, Protestant  family with nothing very exciting to be found.

How wrong I was for I have found that we are descended from Irish Roman Catholic  convicts, that there are numerous skeletons in the family closet and that there existed adventure and romance that I for one never dreamed of and my father, as far as I am aware, never realised.

My mother, would have been shocked, for my earlier memories of her are that she was rather biased against Irish Roman Catholics and judgemental about people’s moral values but as she got older, in line with the changes going on, she mellowed and became more tolerant of other people’s points of view.

The detective work necessary to ferret out the information has taken my wife,Lois, and I to many parts of NSW and VICTORIA whilst the rest of the family have waited to see what would be the next discovery.

The pleasant surprise of receiving phone calls from others researching the READY family has introduced me to Doug Howe and Betty Alford, grandchildren of Catherine Louisa and Sarah Ann, my grandfather’s sisters who married Joseph Howe and William henry Watson respectively. This has opened up more information and has not only led to a continuing friendship with Doug but introduced me to several more cousins on his side of the family. Research by Doug also led to a meeting with Ken Eccleston, great grandson of George Eccleston and his wife Catherine, sister of my great,great grandmother Elizabeth Curtis. Ken’s contributions on the Curtis Family have been invaluable.

Each time I find more information I get a thrill, for there are times when I despair of ever finding the information I want, such as; WHAT HAPPENED TO THOMAS and ELIZABETH HOGAN and to JOHANNAH PRENDERGAST?  I thought that release of the Victorian Records might help but a search of these records has also proven fruitless. Time and further research may find the answer.

Finding my ancestors and researching their history has helped fill in some of my genetic heritage and what has helped in making me the way I am, for each member has added their contribution. I well remember strange feelings I had when I read JOHANNAH’s letter to Governor Darling, and also the story of HANNAH HUTCHINS or HITCHINS ( for there are many variations to the spelling of her name.)

Reading the Surgeon’s account of the voyage of the ‘Dorothy’ gave me some idea of what it was like to travel out on one of the Convict Transports, although the Dorothy apparently had a much better trip than many others.

In some ways I feel that I may have deprived those who come after me of the fun I have had but there is still a lot left untold and each day I guess, we are making history. I hope  that later researchers will enjoy it as much as I have. be careful of what you throw out for, I believe, that although we are not responsible for our ancestors, who incidentally wen through situations that I,for on, would not like to have gone through, we are, as guardians of our heritage, responsible to our descendants.

Phil Ready. July 1988. 

 

TRIAL BAY AND SOUTH WEST ROCKS

trial bay

TRIAL BAY WAS built in a later period than what I’m usually looking at. The connection with South West Rocks was earlier for my direct family. I do however have documents and images from Jan Maurice and Sanders’ were out there as Boatsmen and running a boarding house as well as one lad being remembered in the Memorial Pines. Killed in the war. So we took a drive out there on our recent 2 week Loop and took a look through the Boatsmen’s Houses which are carefully maintained and where,as usual, we encountered enthusiastic and helpful volunteers hanging on to our heritage with Tenacity. Below are some links to TRIAL BAY and some images from our exploration.

TRIAL BAY GAOL

Established in 1886, Trial Bay Gaol is the only example of a state prison specifically built to carry out public works. The intention was for prisoners to construct a breakwater in Trial Bay and create a safe harbour between Sydney and Brisbane.

http://www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au/clicka.htm

KEMSPEY AND THE MACLEAY RIVER

 

http://www.australianexplorer.com/photographs/nsw_architecture_trial_bay_gaol.htm

Trial Bay (Gaol) Photos – (New South Wales)

 

http://www.nnsw.com.au/southwestrocks/trialbay.html

TRIAL BAY GAOL Photo Gallery

 

http://migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/places/zivillager/history.shtml

ZIVIL LAGER

 

http://www.collectionsaustralia.net/org/Trial_Bay_Gaol_National_Parks_and_Wildlife/about/

Trial Bay Gaol National Parks and Wildlife : COLLECTIONS AUSTRALIA NETWORK

 

TRIAL BAY IN 2001  
NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 120 NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 117
NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 121 NOV HPLS GRAFTON TO PORT MACdays 4 119

 

PERMISSION GRANTED

Today I received an email from PHIL READY, who with his wife Lois, ( descendant of 2nd fleet) compiled READY OR NOT . Hours and hours he tells me in the Mitchell Library and many cemeteries. Phil’s work was one of the major initiating factors for me in this venture. He has given me full permission to use his research . Thank you, indeed, Phil.

BACK ON THE TWEED RIVER

march tweed 002

 

WHATEVER it was the BELLs were doing, they are listed as landholders from 1869-1890 , Norman and Agnes have JANET LAURIE and WILLIMINA here in 1871 and 1872, JOHN and MARY ANN have children on the Tweed between 1879 and 1890 and at least JANET LAURIE marries in Murwillumbah in 1898.

JAMES and WILHELLMINA BELL’s children  are listed at the time of Wilhelmina’s death 2 March 1903 as;

NAME AGE COMMENTS ON NSW BDM LISTINGS
MARY(LAURIE) 57

MARY’s marriage is listed as 1866 to ALEXANDER J  LAWRIE in DUNGOG . DOD Stroud 1918

WILHELMINA(DINSEY) 56

MARRIES GEORGE DINSEY IN 1865 IN DUNGOG. This would indicate that Wilhelmina was Mrs Dinsey by the time the Bells moved north. Dinsey Creek is between Condong and Tumbulgum. She dies in 1911 in Murwillumbah.

NORMAN 54 Married AGNES in 1870 at DUNGOG
JOHN 52 Marries MARY ANN MCNEIL in 1878 at TAREE
MARGARET(MCEACHRAN) 50

Listed as an 1880 marriage to  MACEACHRAN JOHN IN LISMORE
Death recorded in 1920 at MURRUMBURRAH.

ELIZABETH(WALKER) 48 I cannot find a WALKER marrying a BELL as yet but ELIZABETH WALKER does die in 1948 in GLOUCESTER.
CHRISTINA(QUIRK) 47 Nor for CHRISTINA as yet but I do have her death In Murwillumbah in 1944 so she was a Tweed woman.

 

 

JOHN and MARY ANN’s 9 children with places and years of birth;

JAMES
1879
TWEED RIVER

NORMAN
1881
TWEED RIVER

ANNE MCLEOD
1883
TWEED RIVER in 1918 married STANLEY WITCHARD in TAREE.

JANET
1885
TWEED RIVER

LESLIE DONALD RAYMOND
1887
TWEED RIVER

MARY HENRIETTA
1890
MURWILLUMBAH married THOMAS MCLENNAN IN TAREE 1914

ROY MCNEIL
1895
LAURIETON

WILHELMINA ELIZABETH
1897
LAURIETON

WILLIAM ALLEN MARRIED JESSIE SARAH READY

 

000_2889

JOHN BELL LANDHOLDER PRIOR TO 1892

 

YOUNGBUTTS ETC 018 YOUNGBUTTS ETC 019
ALONG THE TWEED RIVER NEAR CONDONG EARLY 2008
YOUNGBUTTS ETC 017 YOUNGBUTTS ETC 016
IN THE VICINITY OF THE BELL LAND ON TWEED VALLEY WAY

 

 

 

JOHN BELL’S land survey is dated 1869. His marriage to MARY ANN MCNEIL took place 27 June 1878 down South in the Taree district. Was he in the north before that or did he not come north until that time ? 

From ROY BURTON; at the time of the marriage John gave his place of residence as RAWDON VALE district of GLOUCESTER. Witnesses to the marriage were JOSEPH LAURIE and MARGARET BELL. JOSEPH LAURIE Senior owned property in the RAWDON VALE locality. The witness Joseph was probably the 5th son of Joseph Snr. Refer to the Early History of the Camden Haven p 16. “THE LAURIES”. He was probably best man and was living at PEACH GROVE now known as LAURIETON at the time of the marriage. MARGARET BELL is possibly JOHN’S SISTER. It is possible John worked for the Lauries at Rawdon Vale. After the wedding they moved to the Tweed River where John was cane farming. he was invalided after an accident and the family move from the Tweed to Laurieton in 1892. John died in 1919 and Mary Ann died in 1935.

We still have not located JOHN’S birth in BDMS.

 

CONNECTIONS FROM MURWILLUMBAH AND THE TWEED – BELLS, BIGNELLS, LAURIES AND MORE

NORMAN BELL was the older brother of JOHN BELL wife of MARY ANN MCNEIL. They had adjoining land at CONDONG on the TWEED.

Their parents were JAMES AND WILHELMINA as noted elsewhere. James was the housebreaker transported from Glasgow in 1831 on the YORK and WILHELMINA was the daughter of WILLIAM MCLEOD and JANET MACKAY who came on the JAMES MORAN in 1839. They married in 1839 at MAITLAND when WILHELMINA was 17 years old. Check in the search engine to the right for further details. It appears at this time that the Mcleods and Mackays came as a result of the ruthless clearances of the Sutherland Shires in the HIGHLANDS of Scotland. In the 1860s the BELL boys have land on the TWEED. The NSW BDM records indicate that their father JAMES died in 1859( to be verified). I do not know what brought the boys ( and perhaps more members of their family north from the Maitland Area). Land is also indicated to belong to WILHELLMINA BELL – mother ? sister ? daughter ?

NORMAN BELL was born 1845 and died 15 June 1924 . He is buried in BARRINGTON CEMETERY. His occupations are listed at TWEED RIVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY as farmer/grazier. Whilst on Tweed he was resident at CONDONG. Norman married in 1870 at DUNGOG NSW. His wife was AGNES FRASER HIGGINS and her mother was JANET LAURIE. As my mother used to tell me the BELLS and the LAURIES were ‘tied in somehow”. Her father was JOHN HIGGINS. Agnes Higgins was born at Pt Stephens in 1846 and died in CHATSWOOD, SYDNEY in 1929.

Their children;

names birthdate and place marriage date and spouse death date and place
JANET LAURIE 1871 TWEED RIVER 1898 GEORGE BIGNELL MURWILLUMBAH  
WILLIMINA A 1872 TWEED RIVER JOHN A. GUNN COPELAND 1895 1911 STROUD NSW
JAMES WALTER 1874 PORT STEPHENS   15-8-1886 NSW
AGNES MARY 1876 PORT STEPHENS GORDON A D CLARK STROUD 1915  
ELIZABETH J 1878 PORT STEPHENS JOHN STACE PORT STEPHENS 1903
MARGARET CHRISTINA 1881 BARRINGTON THOMAS FARLEY CRICK SYDNEY 1907  
MARY HENRIETTA 1883 COPELAND WILLIAM JAMES MARTIN STROUD 1907 22-8-1938 KRAMBACH NSW
JOHN JAMES 1889 COPELAND   1923 BARRINGTON
NOREINE F 1893 COPELAND    

From these dates it appears Norman left the Tweed district by the early 1870s whereas John’s Children are born on Tweed between 1879 and 1890 with the youngest being born at Laurieton in the early 90s. Hmm. A rethink required again.

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THE INFORMATION I HAVE IS THAT NO 49 IS JOHN BELL’S LAND . ( YET TO BE VERIFIED AS ONE MAP INDICATES CONDONG AND ONE IS FURTHER ALONG NEAR STOTTS CREEK)

 

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GEORGE  BIGNELL. IN 1898 AT MURWILLUMBAH MARRIED JANET LAURIE BELL DAUGHTER OF NORMAN BELL WHO WAS BROTHER OF JOHN BELL, GRANNY’S HUSBAND.  http://www.aif.adfa.edu.au:8080/showPerson?pid=22518

 

______________________________________________________________

FROM THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1368785

There is mention of a MR BELL managing the ABBOTSFORD SUGAR MILL on the TWEED.

 

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MURWILLUMBAH LINKS

http://www.mit.edu/~dfm/genealogy/sercombe.html Sercombe Families

JAMES MORGAN AND WILLIAM BROWN

5ships_30588_md

SHIPS AT SEA ( NOT OUR SHIPS. JUST SHIPS )

ozmariners@ozlists.com ozmariners@ozlists.com

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WILHELMINA MCLEOD AND SIBLINGS WITH THEIR MOTHER JANET MACKAY IN 1839 and THE JACKSONS ON THE WILLIAM B BROWN IN 1853.

I stumbled across a classified advertisement in an 1839 Gazette for the ship WAVERLEY. I had been looking for the JAMES MORGAN on which I had been told that Wilhelmina and family travelled . It appears now that JAMES MORGAN is the Master’s name and the ship on which they immigrated is the WAVERLEY.

THE WAVERLEY seems also to be carrying Irish convicts so I shall begin looking. The Mcleods and Mackays are registered as from the SUTHERLAND SHIRE of SCOTLAND and coming as immigrants.

Finding that curly one caused me to wonder about the WILLIAM BROWN. I thought that might also have been the Master’s name rather than that of the ship. In fact it is the name of the Schooner and of the owner who, as you will see below, also becomes Master.

 

gse_multipart39203

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly.

 

MARY ANNE WARNER provides this detailed site. I just found the WILLIAM B BROWN on it. The schooner on which the JACKSONS came free in 1853. Mary Anne has a gracious way of dealing with things which I envy and a knack of saying thanks to her helpers which I lack. Great Site.

 

AND FROM NLA. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article667247  The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 21 May 1853, page 2. News

The William Barry Brown, schooner, left
Honolulu 17th February, and called at Strong’s
Island. The crew of the Paragon, whaler of

Nantucket, Captain Nelson, were there, that
vessel having been wrecked on the outer reef on
the 20th March ; she had been out 27 months,
with 400 barrels, and part of the crew came on

to Sydney in the schooner. On account of some
misunderstanding existing between Captain
White, who commanded the William Barry
Brown,on her leaving Honolulu, and Mr. Brown

the owner, Captain While was left at Strong’s
Island.

 

globe_sm

 

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KERSWELL COAT OF ARMS COURTESY MIKE AND SHORT KERSWELL FAMILY HISTORY.

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-family-crest-coat-arms.html

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-coat-of-arms.html

 

LOOK FOR SUSANNAH KERSWELL

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne’s-heritage-web-site