Category Archives: A ONE WAY TICKET

NSW List of Female Convicts Assigned During the Month of May, 1832

Remembering the Past Australia is a site designed for the family historian and history lover, dedicated to providing copies of original articles and resources, with the aim of shedding new light on the lives of ordinary people as they made a life for themselves and their families in colonial Australia and beyond. This site provides free lists of names, along with articles and stories which provide a different perspective of our richly layered history that capture the human spirit, connecting us with the history of ourselves, our families, our communities and with our great country.

Source: NSW List of Female Convicts Assigned During the Month of May, 1832

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SHOTS OF MULL AND TOBERMORY

HOME AND/OR DEPARTURE POINT FOR JENNETT MCLEAN AND OTHER HIGHLAND SCOTS

IMAGES TAKEN OCTOBER 2011.

28.09.11 to mull 03

THE CASTLE OF THE MCLEANS ON MULL.

28.09.11 x mull 09

TOBERMORY.

1838
The BRILLIANT brought Scottish Bounty Immigrants including :
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL( later to become known as GRANNY BELL of LAURIETON, wife of the Invalid Mr John Bell. ) Janet was born in 1831 so she was only a child of 6-7 when she came. Her parents were JOHN MCLEAN and GRACE MCINNES(McGuiness)

A large body of emigrants sailed from Tobermory on the 27th of September for New South Wales. The vessel was the Brilliant, and its size and splendid fittings were greatly admired. “the people to be conveyed by this vessel are decidedly the most valuable that have ever left the shores of Great Britain; they are all of excellent moral character, and from their knowledge of agriculture, and management of sheep and cattle, must prove a most valuable acquisition to a colony like New South Wales.” The Rev. Mr Macpherson, of Tobermory, preached a farewell sermon before the party sailed. The total number of emigrants was 322, made up as follows:—From Ardnamurchan and Strontian, 105; Coll and Tiree, 104; Mull and lona, 56; Morven, 25; Dunoon, 28; teachers, 2; surgeons, 2. A visitor from New South Wales presented as many of the party as he met with letters of introduction, and expressed himself highly gratified with the prospect of having so valuable an addition to the colony. A Government agent superintended the embarkation

29.09.11 x mull 05

29.09.11 x tobermory 17

29.09.11 x tobermory 29

WINDSOR AGAIN

WINDSOR 002

VIEW FROM THE TERRACE MOTEL AT WINDSOR. THE WHARF IS DOWN THERE SOMEPLACE.

http://www.westernsydneylibraries.nsw.gov.au/hawkesbury/history.html

http://www.hawkesburyaustralia.com.au/information/thingsToDo_windsor.asp

I don’t know what I was thinking when we went to visit Windsor. I thought the Old Government House where the Readys were Housekeeper and Dairyman, was out of town somewhere. 

Research remains messy with the 3 house moves and one baby of the last two years. Now, I begin to settle in and unpack previous findings and access some of the newer resources on the net and discover that it was near Thompson Square.

This is our story. We were booked into a ‘resort ‘ online at Vineyard and on arrival found it to be a Last Resort. We sacrificed our pre paid money and headed into Windsor itself, ending up at the Terrace Motel on the River. Now, we find that we were right there where the Old Government House was. Where the Readys walked and worked. WE LOVE RESEARCH !

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=CV0RAAAAIBAJ&sjid=P5YDAAAAIBAJ&pg=443,7905

SITES TO SEE : NEW SOUTH WALES

NEW SOUTH WALES

THE ONLINE BOOKS PAGE.

EMIGRANTS FROM THE FAMILY :

YEAR
SHIP
NAME

1838
BRILLIANT
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL

1839
JAMES MORAN
MCLEODS AND MACKAYS

1849
VICTORIA
WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS

1853
WILLIAM BROWN
JACKSONS

1853
BEEJAPORE
CRAIGS AND HURRELLS

FOR SOME BACKGROUND ATMOSPHERE OF THIS PERIOD , try this one from Google Books:

Notes and sketches of New South Wales: during a residence in that colony

A RESIDENCE IN THAT COLONY FROM 1839 TO 1844.

By Mrs. Charles Meredith

CONTENTS.

Preface \ -i

CHAPTER I.

Embarkation — Indisposition—Pleasures of a Sea Voyage—Fellow-pas-

sengers—Observance of Character—Devonshire Coast—Pilots—Land

Luxuries—H.M.S. Hercules—Eddystone Lighthouse—Last Land . 1

CHAPTER II.

Bay of Biscay—Spanish Coast—Employment the best preventive of.

Ennui—Phosphorescence of the Sea—Portuguese Men-of-war—Swal-

lows— Tenerifie — Speaking the Cherub — Fear of Pirates—Por-

poises—Flying Fish—Capture of a Boneto—Dolphins . 7

Chapter in.

Calm in the Tropics—Sharks — Turtle — lanthina—Shovel-board—

" Crossing the Line "—Loss of the North Star—Southern Constellations

—Moonlight in the Tropics—Sunsets—Waterspouts—"Sun-dogs" . ’16

CHAPTER IV.

Whales and " Jets d’eau"—Birds—Boatswain—Boobies—Cape Pigeon—

Mischief of Idleness—" Mr.Winkles" at Sea—Great Albatross—Nelly

—Stormy Petrel—Blue Petrel—Sailors’ Delicacies—Stormy Weather 23

CHAPTER V.

Island of St. Paul’s—Islands in Bass’s Straits—Mutton-birds—Botany

Bay Heads—General excitement—Heads of Port Jackson—Scenery—

New Zealanders—First sight of Sydney—Pull ashore—Comforts of

Land Life—George Street, Sydney—The Domain—Eucalyptus, &c.

—Wooloomooloo—Government Gardens 31
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VI.

Sydney Market—Fish, &c.—Dust, Flies, Mosquitoes—Drive to the

Lighthouse — Flowers — Parrots—Black Cockatoos—Hyde Park—

Churches — Libraries — " Currency " Population — Houses — Balls,

&c. —Inns—Colonial Newspapers Page 43

CHAPTER VII.

Leave Sydney—" Clearings"—Huts of the Working Classes — Chain-

Gangs — Parramatta — Creeks and Rivers —Inn — Birds — Road to

Penrith—Grasshoppers—Penrith—Nepean—Emu Plains—Ascent of

the Blue Mountains—Waratah 56

CHAPTER VIII.

A "Country Inn"—Breakfast—Contrasts—A Bush Ramble and Digres-

sion about Ants—Mountain Scenery—Cattle Skeletons—"Weather-

board" Inn—Supper and Night at " Bliud Paddy’s"—Mountains, and

the Surveyor’s Roads—Mount Victoria—Convict Gangs and Bush-

rangers—Inn at the " Rivulet," and its Inhabitants—The Ruling Vice 66

CHAPTER IX.

" Hassan’s Walls"—Grass Trees—Mount Lambey—Victoria Inn—Speci-

men of Benevolent Politeness—Colonial Bridges—First View of

Bathurst—The " Settlement"—Dearth—Climate—Hot Winds—Pro-

cessions of Whirlwinds—Hurricanes . . . . . .79

CHAPTER X.

».

Bathurst Society and Hospitality—" White Rock"—Native Dance and

Ceremony—Kangaroo Dance—Appearance of Natives—Children—

" Gins "—Their marriage, slavery, and sufferings—Family Dinner-

party—Adopted Children—Infanticide—Religion — " Devil-Devil"—

Language—Story of Hougong and Jimmy—" Ay, ay ?"—Duties of

the Toilet—Native Songs—Mimicry—Fondness for English Dress—

Boundary Laws—Legal Parricide—Habitual Treachery . .90

CHAPTER XI.

Native Huts—" Gunyon"—Natives’ ingenuity in Duck-Snaring and

Fishing—Native Weapons—Green Frogs—Freshwater Shells—Platy-

pus — Spur-winged Plover—Australian Harebell — Convolvulus —

Everlastings—Peppermint Tree—Opossums—Natives’ mode of taking

His
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XII. ,

Native Turkeys—Their mode of Incubation—Native Cranberry—Our

Return — Locusts — Manna — Transformations — Ground Grubs —

Night at the Rivulet—New flowers—Heat and Dust—" Weather-

board" Inn—Walk to the Cascade—Fringed Violet—Waratahs—

Fine View—Lories Page 114

CHAPTER XIII.

Storm and fine view on Lapstone Hill—Farm-house in the " public" line

—Arrive at Parramatta — Steamboat — Scenery on the " River "—

Sydney Christmas Tree—Christmas Day—Tippling Servants . 124

CHAPTER XIV.

Homebush—Colonial Country-houses—The " Avenue"—Gates—Slip-

rails — Bushrangers — Mounted Police — Dingoes — Flying Fox —

Flying Opossum—Native Cats—Birds—Robins—Swallows— Knife-

grinder—Coachman—Bell-bird—Laughing Jackass—Larks—Game 129

CHAPTER XV.

Norfolk Island Pine—English Pear-tree—Daisy — Bush Flowers—

Creepers—He-oak—Zamia—" Wooden Pear-tree"—Native Cherry—

Insect Architecture—Twig-nests, &c.—Butterflies—Ground Spiders—

Tarantula—Silk Spiders—Scorpions—Hornets—Mosquitoes—Ants . 139

CHAPTER XVI.

Guanas—Lizards—Snakes—Salt Marshes—Fishing—Crabs—Toad-fish

—Mangrove-trees—Romance and reality—Night sounds — Orange-

Groves—Gardens—Gigantic Lily—Scarcity of fresh water—Winter

Rains—Salt Well — Climate in Winter—Society — Conversation—

Servants—Domestic matters—Embarkation for Van Diemen’s Land 150

N.B. OUR EMIGRANTS WOULD NOT HAVE HAD THE SAME ADVANTAGES AS MRS MEREDITH .

SITES TO SEE : THE TIME OF ANN MORAN AND THE HERCULES.

http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1802.htm

http://www.convictconnections.org.au/shipsA-I.html

http://www.danbyrnes.com.au/blackheath/ships3.htm

http://www.historyservices.com.au/nsw_colonial_chronology_1770_1803.htm

http://www.jstor.org/pss/27516597

http://www.mcginleyclan.org/irishslaves.htm

 

EXTRACT FROM http://www.ulladulla.info/historian/1804deaths.html

Deaths 1804 NSW & Norfolk Island Early Colonial History Research and Indexed by Historian Cathy Dunn. 

Castle Hill

HUGHES

James

1804

SG 19 Jan 1806. Last week a native informed Tarlington, a settler, that the skeleton of a white man, with a musket and tin kettle laying beside him, had been seen under the first ridge of the mountains. The settler accompanied the native, and found the skeleton, and as described, the bones of which being very long, leads to a more than probable conjecture, that the remains are those of James Hughes, who absconded from Castle Hill the 15th of February 1804, in company with 15 others, most of whom had recently arrived in the Hercules, on the ridiculous pretext of finding a road to China, but in reality to commit the most unheard of depredations; the consequences of which were, that the whole except Hughes were shortly apprehended, and 13 capitally convicted before the Criminal Court, of whom two were executed, and 11 pardoned. Hughes was an able active man, well known in Ireland during the rebellion that existed in that country for his abominable depravities; and it is hoped his miserable end will warn the thoughtless, inexperienced and depraved against an inclination to exchange the comfort and security derived from honest labour, to depart from which can only lead to the most fatal consequences

Parramatta

HUMES

Samuel

Mar 1804

Leader in the 1804 Battle of Vinegar Hill – rebellion executed at Parramatta and hung in chains, Convict Hercules I 1802

________________________________________________________

 

Revolution, counter-revolution, and union

By Jim Smyth

PAUL FERGUS AND ANN MORAN AND JOHN CURTIS

 

Dear Lynne
I also am descended from John Curtis and Ann Moran through their daughter Catherine and George Eccleston. I am their third great-grandson.
In two weeks, my wife and I will be visiting Ireland and I am hoping that I might be able to do a bit more research on the ground about Ann as she certainly seems to have been a remarkable woman.
I am trying to resolve a number of discrepancies between various items of information in my possession.
The best information seems to indicate that she was convicted in Trim in Co Meath in 1797 (coincidentally the year that John arrived in Sydney)in connection with political activities and that she was held in jail in Ireland for five years before being transported to Australia on the Hercules in November 1801, arriving here on 26 June 1802. One record in the State Library implies that the prisoners on the Hercules were convicted for offences in the “late rebellion” which can only mean the United Irishmen in 1798 from the context.
I should be grateful for any information you can provide that might assist with my research in Ireland.
While visiting my son and his family in London after Ireland, I intend to return to Bristol to undertake more research into John Curtis. I obtained a lot of information 18 months ago including records of the marriage of John Curtis and Jane Purrier and of the baptisms of all 11 of their children in St Philip and St Jacobs Church in Cheese Lane, Bristol. From these records, I managed to visit the three streets in which they lived at the times of the births of different children. For most of their married life they lived in Cheese Lane, near the Church. I suspect that as his accountancy practice failed and he got into financial difficulties, the family was forced to move to less salubrious accommodation.
I also managed to obtain copies of one press report of John’s conviction and death sentence at Gloucester Assizes for coining. The judge must have been feeling sympathy for John because another man convicted and sentenced to death at the same sittings was immediately taken for “execution of the sentence” but the judge commuted John’s sentence to transportation for life.
After returning to Australia in April 2008, I managed to locate descendants of John’s and Jane’s youngest child in New York.
Paul Fergus

JOHN READY c 1790-1831 PT 2.

Whilst John Ready journeyed out, Governor Macquarie had been making tremendous advances in the affairs of the Colony and had worked hard to better the lot of all. The new towns of Windsor, Castlereagh, Wilberforce and Pittown that he had created were going well, but the Gentry were upset by his kindness and thoughtfulness to the emancipists whom he considered to be the backbone of the future nation. He was also having problems with the 73rd Regiment and asked that it be removed complete for instead of upholding the law, it was like its predecessor the NSW Rum Corps, flouting it. (Macquarie His Life, Adventures and Times. A. M. Ellis.)

Drought had continued all through the Summer and Autumn of early 1814, but by April the road to Windsor was finished and the Turnpike from Sydney to Liverpool almost completed, with all able bodied men having to contribute labour in building the section near the properties, which would benefit them when completed. 

It was into this scene, with food becoming ever scarcer as the drought continued and the Colony awaiting the shipment of grain from India, that JOHN READY and the other prisoners from the THREE BEES entered.

Taken to the prisoners’ barracks they were divided into groups, allocated to Parramatta, Windsor or Liverpool and sent there under guard. John , travelling along the newly completed road was sent to WINDSOR and put to work in the Government Dairy. Whether this was just coincidence, or because his mother, JOHANNAH READY, worked in Government House is unknown, but he was receiving rations there in 1814 (Windsor Ration Book loc. A 803 pp 56,66,116 ML) and in the same year was mentioned as being Overseer at the Government Dairy.

Towards the end of that desperate year, whilst Cox was building his road over the mountains, the rains came and the crops which such a short time before looked doomed, began to look as if they would give a reasonable harvest. Things commenced to improve for all, grass finally started to grow again, the cows to give more milk and the beef cattle to fill out.

In the SYDNEY GAZETTE of the 21st September 1816 and again in 1817, it is recorded that a letter had arrived for JOHN. Regretfully there is no record of who sent them or where they came from but the family in Ireland was obviously keeping in touch as moves were later made by his mother to bring his brother Philip and family out to Australia. On his next visit to Sydney, John was able to see the advances made to the Town for the new Hospital was rising in Macquarie Street under the direction of FRANCIS GREENWAY and built at no cost to the Government.

 

For the next two years John went about his business at the Dairy without attracting adverse attention and on the 30th April 1819 there appeared an entry in the LAND OFFICE Records.

 

DOWNEY TO READY

Deed Poll bearing the date the 15th day February 1819 under the hand and seal of PATRICK DOWNEY of prospect, settler whereby for the considerations therein mentioned he, the said PATRICK DOWNEY.

Did absolutely bargain, sell, assign, transfer and make over to JOHN READY of PARRAMATTA all his right, title and interest of five houses and tenements, situate in GEORGE ST PARRAMATTA, formerly the Property of THOMAS PEARCE purchased by him the said PATRICK DOWNEY at Public Auction which said houses and Tenements are more particularly described in a certain assignment dated 30th day November 1818 from  ROBERT JENKINS to him the said PATRICK DOWNEY. 

On the 31st August John was granted a pardon by Governor Macquarie (Pardons Reel 771 AO) and on 4th February 1820 at the age of thirty, was joined at ST JOHN’S PARRAMATTA, in the bonds of Holy Matrimony to Elizabeth, the 17 year old daughter of JOHN CURTIS and ANN MORAN who lived nearby at Toongabbie. The ceremony was conducted by JOHN CROSS with MICHAEL AND MARY DWYEE as witnesses. ( St Johns Register ML).

As a married man owning twenty head of cattle, John applied for a grant of 50 acres of land to start a farm of his own. The grant was made in 1821 and listed in the 12 May edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE.

 

On the 31st August John was granted a pardon by Governor Macquarie (Pardons Reel 771 AO) and on 4th February 1820 at the age of thirty, was joined at ST JOHN’S PARRAMATTA, in the bonds of Holy Matrimony to Elizabeth, the 17 year old daughter of JOHN CURTIS and ANN MORAN who lived nearby at Toongabbie. The ceremony was conducted by JOHN CROSS with MICHAEL AND MARY DWYEE as witnesses. ( St Johns Register ML).

In the 1825 Muster, John is listed as being a landholder at CASTLE HILL but he is recorded as supplying fresh meat to the Commissariat at Parramatta on 24 February 1821 and Pork on 24th March 1821 so must have had access to some land in the meantime. 

John and Elizabeth’s marriage however was going through a stormy time with the unhappy Elizabeth eventually running away, for in the 15 February edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE a notice appeared warning anyone against giving credit to his wife ELIZABETH READY, formerly Curtis, on his account as she had run away from home without any just cause or provocation.

John was again mentioned in the SYDNEY GAZETTE of 8th JANUARY 1823 as having supplied meat to the Government Stores.

With the income from the property acquired from PATRICK DOWNEY earlier, John decided to expand his interests and on the 25th April 1825, a notice from the Surveyor-General’s Office appeared in the AUSTRALIAN that a grant of land was ready for delivery to JOHN REIDY(sic) and FRANCIS PENDERGRASY. ( Francis had married John’s mother Johannah the previous year.)

COLONIAL MOTHERS

THE SAG Newsletter reports that Dr Tanya Evans, now of Macquarie University, is engaged in researching the history of motherhood in early Colonial Australia and Britain between 1750 and 1850. The focus has caught my fancy. My Mind seems to have taken a disproportionate amount of time in recovering from the Change of year and the Summer Season and I haven’t been able to get my mental historical  hard drive functioning at all but this little article has begun to bring the ghosts back to life again. Dr Evans is asking for assistance from any who have worked extensively on their family histories and have details of mothers from these early times. Dept of Modern History at Macquarie University, Sydney would have the contact details for you.

As for me, it has me thinking of all the Mothers of Mine who and the folkore I have been given. The Scottish Widow who was asked to be Laird of the Clan but came out here with her children instead.  Johannah Ready Prendergast, whose son John was sent as a convict to Government House at Windsor where his mother was Housekeeper. I wonder often about Johannah who was 47 when convicted in Ireland. She tried to have another son and his family sent out but failed. When John’s marriage failed and he became excessively odd in his behaviour and was sentenced to Moreton Bay, Johannah disappears from the records. I like to think she followed him.

Ann Moran and Hannah Hutchings/Hitchens. What was it like for them to be mothers here in the early 19th Century ? Young convict women. Ann had 5 children to John Curtis who was already husband and father to a family in England and had attempted to have them brought to him.  Hannah was recorded as a ‘ loose woman’ on the convict ship THE BROTHERS. How did her life as a mother develop from that starting point and from the death of her first husband in the Lunatic Asylum, Liverpool ?

IN THIS YEAR : 1838 -JESSIE – JENNET-JANET MCLEAN (later MCNEIL) ON THE BRILLIANT

 

1838
The BRILLIANT brought Scottish Bounty Immigrants including :
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL( later to become known as GRANNY BELL of LAURIETON, wife of the Invalid Mr John Bell. ) Janet was born in 1831 so she was only a child of 6-7 when she came. Her parents were JOHN MCLEAN and GRACE MCINNES(McGuiness)

The John Bells during the 1880s are said to have had a house at Palm Vale on the Tweed and the accident which invalided him. apparently rendering him unable to walk and preceding their removal to LAURIETON, took place in the sugar industry on the Tweed near CONDONG and TUMBULGUM.

Mary Ann married John  in 1878 in Taree.   

44691_family_md

 

immigration article4168774-3-001The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 17 November 1837, page 2 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4168774
The Hobart Town Courier Friday 17 November 1837 Supplement: Supplement to the Hobart Town Courier., page 2.

The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 5 January 1838, page 2
With the BRILLIANT due later in JANUARY.

BUNMORAH article4167785-3-001The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 5 January 1838, page 2

5ships_30588_md

JESSIE – JENNETT – JANET MCLEAN AND THE BRILLIANT 1838

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, October 14, 18372 EMBARKATION BRILLIANT

THIRD AND LAST EMBARKATION OF HIGHLANDERS TO AUSTRALIA FOR THE SEASON
Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, October 14, 1837; Issue 18331.

Ships to Australia 1837-39

From the British Parliamentary Papers of 1839 II – Respecting Emigration to the Colonies

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/au1838.htm

The Brilliant, a sailing ship of 428 tons, left Scotland for the Australian Colonies on September 27, 1837 and carried some 300 Scottish
people who were leaving their homeland under the bounty immigration system.

The selection was made by a selecting officer. 320 people embarked on the BRILLIANT and there was only one death recorded. The BRILLIANT was built in MONTREAL in 1834 and was 429 tons. She was taken up by the EMIGRATION DEPARTMENT on August 19 1837 in LEITH . The emigrants embarked in the HEBRIDES. The name of the owner was S PATERSON and she was hired at the rate of 4pounds 17/6 per ton.  A. Campbell was the Surgeon Superintendent on the voyage. The BRILLIANT departed on the 27 Sep 1837 and arrived in NSW on 27 Jan 1838. 126 days at sea with a touching at the Cape on 29 Nov 1837.
74 males.
84 females.
59 children between 14 and 7.
103 children under 7.
320 in total with 2 children born on the voyage.
The 1 death was that of a child.

"They Came in the Brilliant: A History of the McLaurin, McMee" Author: J. O. Randell

Title: They Came in the Brilliant: A History of the McLaurin, McMeekin and Paton Families
Publisher: Brown Prior Anderson Location: U.S.A.

From Log Of Logs, Vol.2. By Ian Nicholson
Brilliant, ship 428t, Gilkinson; Tobermory, Mull, 27/9 with 318 Highland
1837-1838 immigrants for Sydney.
+ Account of departure published in *Inverness Courier,
reproduced in
*Australian Biography & General Record, No. 15. (Sydney July
1990)

 

 

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-IMMIGRATION-SHIPS/2007-12/1197018234

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/australia1837.htm

 

Watterson Family http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~watterson/wattersonrootsweb.html

McLeod Family of Ulmarra

  • Letters published in Sydney Morning Herald in January 1838 regarding the voyage of the "Brilliant"

NSW State Records film # 1288 SCOTTISH BOUNTY MIGRANTS.

ON THE BRILLIANT 1837-1838

JOHN McGREGOR .

John, Elizabeth and their young family came to Australia in 1838 on the ship "Brilliant" and settled in the Williams River area. They later moved to the Clarence River district where John and Elizabeth resided for the remainder of their lives.

John McGregor died 28th August, 1888 at Ulmarra, NSW, and Elizabeth on 25th August, 1869, also at Ulmarra.

http://www.angelfire.com/bc/juliette/page4.html

MAY HOLS 08 006
ULMARRA 2008

404px-Queen_Victoria,_1838  

Meanwhile  Queen Victoria was being crowned as per following article

When Victoria Was Crowned; DESCRIPTION OF THE CORONATION OF 1838, BY AN EYE-WITNESS OF THE IMPOSING CEREMONIAL.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9F0CEED6103DEE32A25752C1A9639C946397D6CF

FROM THE CEMETERIES SITE OF GREAT LAKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM

http://greatlakeshistorical.museum.com/cemeteries.html
http://greatlakeshistorical.museum.com/krambach.html

Obituary notice.

Donald Cameron.

The death of Mr. Donald Cameron of Port Stephens of which the usual Obituary Notice was inserted in the "Empire" of Friday last deserves a more extended notice than it then and there received.

Mr. Cameron was a native of Ardnamurchan, Argyleshire, Scotland and was upwards of sixty years of age when he emigrated with his family to the colony per ship "Brilliant" which sailed from Tobar Mory in the Isle of Mull in the year 1838, being ninety years of age when he died on the 12th instant. READ ON

JANET/JENNETT MCLEAN ALSO SAILED FROM TOBER MORY IN THE ISLE OF MULL.

tobermory1

TOBER MORY BY JAMES WISEMAN http://www.jameswiseman.com/tobermory.php

OTHER MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT.
Allan McLean and Janet McFarlane

http://jamesobrien.id.au/genealogy/allan-mclean-and-janet-mcfarlane/

Inverness Courier Index 1837, p212

A large body of emigrants sailed from Tobermory on the 27th of September for New South Wales. The vessel was the Brilliant, and its size and splendid fittings were greatly admired. “the people to be conveyed by this vessel are decidedly the most valuable that have ever left the shores of Great Britain; they are all of excellent moral character, and from their knowledge of agriculture, and management of sheep and cattle, must prove a most valuable acquisition to a colony like New South Wales.” The Rev. Mr Macpherson, of Tobermory, preached a farewell sermon before the party sailed. The total number of emigrants was 322, made up as follows:—From Ardnamurchan and Strontian, 105; Coll and Tiree, 104; Mull and lona, 56; Morven, 25; Dunoon, 28; teachers, 2; surgeons, 2. A visitor from New South Wales presented as many of the party as he met with letters of introduction, and expressed himself highly gratified with the prospect of having so valuable an addition to the colony. A Government agent superintended the embarkation.

THERE are a lot of MCLEANS on this BRILLIANT trip of 1838.
Some of them include:

MCLEAN Allan 49
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Wife 40; boat builder

MCLEAN Allan 28
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Wife 20; shepherd

MCLEAN Allan 19
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Anne 18
Brilliant
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Anne 15
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; country servant

 

 

MORE MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT 1838

MCLEAN Archibald 22
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Archibald 16
Brilliant 24/01/1838
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Bell 25 Brilliant
24/01/1838
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN Charles 36
Brilliant  24/01/1838 

Wife 35; farm servant

MORE MCLEANS ON THE BRILLIANT 1838

MCLEAN Donald 28 Brilliant
Wife 30; mason

MCLEAN Donald 30
Brilliant
Wife 28; farm servant

MCLEAN Dugald 30
Unmarried; fam overseer

MCLEAN Ellen 20
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Hugh 23
Unmarried; shepherd

MCLEAN Isabella 20
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN James 16
Unmarried; farm servant

MCLEAN Janet 18
Unmarried; country servant

MCLEAN Janet 29
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN John 32
Wife 28; farm servant

MCLEAN John 32
Wife 27; farm servant

MCLEAN Marion 68
Widow; farm housekeeper

MCLEAN Mary 27
Unmarried; housemaid

MCLEAN Roderick 35
Wife 35; farm servant

MCLEAN Roderick 30
Wife 22; farm servant

article2550732-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 27 January 1838

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 27 January 1838

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550732

brilliant article2550113-3-001The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1838, page 3
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 30 January 1838, page 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550113

   

 

article2547105-3-002brilliantbrilliant 

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 3 February 1838, page 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2547105

   

 

JANET MACKAY AND WILHELMINA MCLEOD ON THE WAVERLEY

arrow_16061_lg

(CHECK DATES AND NAMES: INFORMATION FROM TWEED HISTORICAL SOCIETY;

JAMES BELL ,28, from Gallowsgate , Glasgow , Scotland transported for housebreaking. Tried in Glasgow. 7 years. Arrived on the YORK on 7-2-1831. Assigned to Paterson River. Certificate of freedom – 9.8.1838

WILHELMINA MCLEOD emigrated from Sutherland Shire Scotland, with her mother JANET MACKAY , two sisters and a brother on the JAMES MORGAN arriving Sydney 11-2-1839. The family moved to the Hunter.

James and  Wilhelmina married on 29-9-1840  at the Scots Church Paterson.)

The only records I have so far found are as below but its later than February. Best visit BB again and set my thinking straight. In the meantime;

 

JAMES MORGAN MASTER

SHIP Waverley (1) ARRIVED NSW 17.6.1839

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549022

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 14 May 1839, page 2.

The Mellish sailed from the Downs on
the 17th January, with a cargo of mer-
chandise for this port. Her agents are
Messrs. Hughes and Hosking.

The Whitby cleared outwards on the
12th January, and the Waverley on the
16th in ballast ; both for Sydney. In

all probability they bring either emigrants

or convicts.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2551381

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 18 June 1839, page 3. News

The Whitby, Captain Melbank, sailed
from Dublin, with female prisoners,
bound to Sydney, four days previous to
the Waverley.

The Waverley spoke the Lady Bute,

from Greenock, bound to South Aus
tialia and Sydney, with merchandise and
passengers, on the 3d May, in lat. 38 °
45′ S., long. 25 50′ E.-all well ; and,
on the 4th May, spoke the Ann Watson,
from Bristol, bound to Launceston and

Sydney, with merchandise and passen-
gers-all well.

SYDNEY GAZETTE.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2551380

TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 1839.

English Intelligence.

By the Waverley, with male convicts
from Ireland, we have received London
papers to the 18th February, inclusive.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549645

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 20 June 1839, page 2

The Waverley and Indemnity are advertised for freight or charter.

 

EXPORTS.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549648

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 20 June 1839, page 2.

THE WAVERLEY.-Among the convicts
arrived by the Waverley is Carrick, the
Roman Catholic Monk, whose trial and
conviction on a charge of torturing a
child to death created a strong excitement
in Ireland some eight or nine months

since. The Roman Catholics not being
quite so powerful at head quarters as they
were in the time of Sir Richard Bourke,
when another special who shall be name-
less, was brought to Sydney and allowed
to go at large, we presume Carrick will
be forwarded to Port Macquarie forth-
with, or sent to vegetate on Cockatoo

Island.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2546850

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 25 June 1839, page 2

The CONVICT BARRACKS.-On Satur-
day last His Excellency the Governor
visited the Prisoners’ Barracks, Hyde
Park, for the purpose of inspecting the
convicts who arrived by the Waverley.
The names of the men were called over,

and they were ranged round His Excel-
lency in a circle, when he explained to
them the situation in which they were
placed in regard to the term of probation
they were required to serve before being
assigned to private service, and the
rewards held out to them, by indulgences,
for good behaviour.

 

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2537911

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 23 July 1839, page 3.

Vessels cleared from the 13th to the 20th instant

inclusive

July 13-WAVERLEY, 436 tons, Morgan,

master, for India, in ballast.

 

  • Richard GILBERT, 22, Soldier, b. SAL, T: from Dublin 22/02/1839 to Sydney NSW17/06/1839, Ship: Waverley 1.

 

 

 

     

  • Guide to Using the ARK – Musters & Other Papers
  • Waverley (1) 1839 p.1

    Receipts for prisoners etc; and Chief Justice’s Warrants for Military prisoners

     

  • I am including this snippet due to the Bell name being linked with a WAVERLEY trip South. Wilhelmina Mcleod married James Bell. 
  • WINDUSS family – Tasmania and Victoria, Australia

John WINDUSS was born in December 1809 at Otterburn, Yorkshire, England and married Mary BELL. John belonged to the 96th Regiment and arrived in Hobart on 21st September 1841 on the ship “Waverley” with wife Mary.
As with the TEVELEIN family I have found most WINDUSS names in Tasmania and Victoria are connected to John and Mary and there are also WINDUSS descendants of John and Mary in Western Australia and New Zealand.
http://www.flexi.net.au/~rkbt/more_research.html

____________________________________________________________

While I’m at this one – research to date indicates that WILLIAM and ELIZABETH JACKSON came on WILLIAM BROWN SCHOONER in 1853. Looking at records I find that the BEEJAPORE ( see also CRAIGS AND HURRELLS) which arrived in 1853, brought a number of JACKSONS and was clearly an emigrant ship which the WILLIAM BROWN was not.

Note to self. FOLLOW THROUGH ON THESE RECORDS. NSW STATE ARCHIVES

JACKSON
Elizabeth
32
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Elizabeth
dv
1
and family
Beejapore
1853
2464

JACKSON
Elizabeth
5
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
William
7
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Marianne
10
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

ACKSON
Mary
bv
inft
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Susan
30
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Susan
3
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Thomas
bv
inft
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Robert
32
and family
Beejapore

JACKSON
James
39
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
James
12
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
James
9
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
George T
2
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

JACKSON
Henry
32
and family
Beejapore
1853
2136, 2464

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________

QUIRKS ON THE VICTORIA 1849. WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS ARRIVED AS ASSISTED EMIGRANTS ON VICTORIA 1849

http://www.baker1865.com/quirk.htm

Peter Quirke (1798-1863)- arrived on board the Ship Neptune in 1854

  • Arrived with wife Mary and five children in 1854.
  • Farm labourer, the son of James QUIRKE and Alice QUIRKE née REID, was born at St Johnswell ,Kilkenny Ireland in 1798.

  • He married Catherine RYAN in Kilkenny, Ireland circa 1823. The marriage producing four children.

    • James  QUIRK (c. 1824-dec.),

    • Nicholas (c. 1825-c. 1835), Arrived in NSW on board the Ship Victoria in 1849, he married Mary McMahon

    • Margaret QUIRK (c. 1828-1915),  – Arrived in NSW on board the Ship Victoria in 1849,  she Married George Fell in 1855 and died at Waverley in 1915.

    • Michael Quirk (c1832)

JAMES MORGAN AND WILLIAM BROWN

5ships_30588_md

SHIPS AT SEA ( NOT OUR SHIPS. JUST SHIPS )

ozmariners@ozlists.com ozmariners@ozlists.com

_________________________________________________________

WILHELMINA MCLEOD AND SIBLINGS WITH THEIR MOTHER JANET MACKAY IN 1839 and THE JACKSONS ON THE WILLIAM B BROWN IN 1853.

I stumbled across a classified advertisement in an 1839 Gazette for the ship WAVERLEY. I had been looking for the JAMES MORGAN on which I had been told that Wilhelmina and family travelled . It appears now that JAMES MORGAN is the Master’s name and the ship on which they immigrated is the WAVERLEY.

THE WAVERLEY seems also to be carrying Irish convicts so I shall begin looking. The Mcleods and Mackays are registered as from the SUTHERLAND SHIRE of SCOTLAND and coming as immigrants.

Finding that curly one caused me to wonder about the WILLIAM BROWN. I thought that might also have been the Master’s name rather than that of the ship. In fact it is the name of the Schooner and of the owner who, as you will see below, also becomes Master.

 

gse_multipart39203

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly.

 

MARY ANNE WARNER provides this detailed site. I just found the WILLIAM B BROWN on it. The schooner on which the JACKSONS came free in 1853. Mary Anne has a gracious way of dealing with things which I envy and a knack of saying thanks to her helpers which I lack. Great Site.

 

AND FROM NLA. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article667247  The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 21 May 1853, page 2. News

The William Barry Brown, schooner, left
Honolulu 17th February, and called at Strong’s
Island. The crew of the Paragon, whaler of

Nantucket, Captain Nelson, were there, that
vessel having been wrecked on the outer reef on
the 20th March ; she had been out 27 months,
with 400 barrels, and part of the crew came on

to Sydney in the schooner. On account of some
misunderstanding existing between Captain
White, who commanded the William Barry
Brown,on her leaving Honolulu, and Mr. Brown

the owner, Captain While was left at Strong’s
Island.

 

globe_sm

 

_________________________________________________________

KERSWELL COAT OF ARMS COURTESY MIKE AND SHORT KERSWELL FAMILY HISTORY.

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-family-crest-coat-arms.html

http://www.4crests.com/kerswell-coat-of-arms.html

 

LOOK FOR SUSANNAH KERSWELL

http://www.myheritage.com/site-29656891/lynne’s-heritage-web-site

FATTORINI ISLAND MCLEAY RIVER NSW

WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS arrived in the Colony per VICTORIA on 4-9-1849. Their first child ELIZABETH GRACE was born at Horsely in 1850. Apparently they went to THOMAS SANDERS or his family in this western area of Sydney. They then moved North via the New England and eventually to the MCLEAY RIVER where they made their home. In 1852 HARRIET FRANCES was born at YARRABANDINI as was WILLIAM GEORGE in 1854.  FREDERICK JOHN was born on the MCLEAY RIVER in 1855 and CHARLES HENRY at AUSTRAL EDEN in 1860.

YARRABANDINNI.

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-NSW-SE/1999-06/0928673407

Yarrabandini, Mcleay River, Kempsey, NSW was a station 19,200 acres owned by R. Searle that I have listed in 1865

The next three children were born at FLATTORINI ISLAND in 1861,62 and 64. They were ALFRED SIVERT, ERNEST ALBERT and MARY ANN.

The next 5 children were all born in KINCHELA. WALTER,AGNES,EDRED,SARAH and CHRISTOPHER who was accidentally shot by his brother when he was 9 years old and killed.

FLATTORINI ISLAND has my attention today. Looking through the NLA digitised newspapers – I come across the word FATTORINI and am beginning to consider that the Island may well have derived from that name.

I  have a mention of DR FATTORINI. In 1830 he is mentioned as one of the medical men treating the poor of Sydney at the SYDNEY INFORMARY. Other medicos mentioned are DRS BLAND, MITCHELL, FORSTER AND JEANNERET.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2195705

He is also an Honorary Surgeon with the Benevolent Society. In October 1830, a MR MOWATT was robbed by villains. Amongst the takings by the thieves were bills drawn by DR FATTORINI for considerable sums of money. Two villains were involved in the robbery . One was a short man dressed in a black hat, velveteen jacket and dark trowsers. The other was thin and wore a straw hat. An old straw hat. He had dark skin and ” to the best of Mr Mowatt’s recollection” wore whiskers.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2196392

On the 11th April 1831 – one AUGUSTUS ANTONIO was attended By Dr Fattorini and Dr McTiernan at the TALBOT INN BRICKFIELD-HILL. He had succumbed to deliterious fumes from one of the vats which were were a-brewing and despite attempts to resuscitate  , life was declared extinct.

I still have no connection between the Island in the River McLeay where the Sanders children were born and the Good Doctor – but I find him an interesting character.

In August 1832, Dr FATTORINI was coming into Sydney from Liverpool, in company with JOSHUA JOHN MOORE Esq. They were travelling on top of the coach when they saw a crowd of people gathered. There was EDWARD KENNEDY in custody of some constables. Straightaways, Dr F recognised the the greatcoat Kennedy wore as being the Doctor’s very own which had been stolen from his servant. Mr Moore joined in. THAT’S THE MAN THAT ROBBED ME – said he. Mr and Mrs Moore had been vigorously robbed of a good many things only a few days before whilst on the road.

Edward Kennedy, however, had witnesses, two of them, to say that he was with them and intoxicated ( a not uncommon condition of the times apparently). The witnesses did a less than effective job of convincing anyone of their veracity and Mr Kennedy was in deep trouble along with his perjuring mates.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208002

In October 1832, the Doctor purchases a farm near the Orphan School At Parramatta. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208970

The transaction ends up in the SUPREME COURT with disputes over the bills and deposit. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2209304

March 1833 sees DR FATTORINI back in the SUPREME COURT in SYDNEY. The case is FATTORINI vs UNDERWOOD.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2211052

Mr Underwood had refused to pay the Doctor for 90 visits he had made. The Judge does mention that Dr F does not appear to be a graduate of any Universities and is a mere surgeon. He does in the end win his case to the amount of 150 pounds.

In 1834 , he applied for 2 lots of over 600 acres each at Brisbane Water, Northumberland Shire. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2215174

The land was bounded on the South by Bean’s land , on the North by the section line and on the east by a line to include the quantity. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2215587

Still no indication of his having land as far north as the McLeay.

In March 1834 , 3 horses were impounded from the ESTATE OF DR FATTORINI. If they were not claimed by the 24th , Walter Schutt the Poundkeeper was going to sell them. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2215738

5 JULY 1834 SYDNEY GAZETTE http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2216550

Notwithstanding the late improvements made in the streets of Sydney, there is still great room for further amendment. From the recant rains, parts of Kent and Sussex streets, especially that portion of the former which lies between King and Market streets have become nearly ‘impassable, and several accidents to carriage and foot passengers have been the consequence. Dr. Fattorini a few days since was in great danger of being thrown out of his chaise from this circumstance, while making the tour of his professional visits in that quarter ; we trust therefore that no time will be lost in correcting this evil, of which the inhabitants residing in that neighbourhood loudly complain.

JAMES HAMAGE a servant in Dr F’s employ was brought before the court as a runaway. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2196957 Jan 1835. Sydney Gazette.

In the same month another assigned servant who ran away was apprehended . http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2197017

Thursday 5 February 1835 . DR FATTORINI HAS REMOVED TO NO 75 PITT-STREET.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2197251

This left the elegant verandah cottage he had previously occupied, available for rental. It was in Castlereagh=street – at a rental of 86 pounds per annum. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2197406

STILL NO CONNECTION TO THE MCLEAY. WE WILL RETURN TO THE GOOD DOCTOR AT A LATER DATE.

DR FATTORINI’S ASSIGNED SERVANTS ( In brackets after the name is the ship on which the convict arrived . If a number follows it indicates the 1st, 2nd , 3rd etc voyage of that ship to the Colony. )

The first listing is a DR FATTORINI in Sydney in the SYDNEY GAZETTE of July 1832. He had been assigned a labourer GEORGE POTTER (Guildford 8).
DR FATTORINI is also assigned a tinman and brazier by the name of GEORGE COLLINS ( ROYAL GEORGE). DR FATTORINI is still in Sydney in August 1832.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208207
In September 1832, JAMES GORDON (EXMOUTH) was assigned to Dr F as GROOM. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208724
SAMUEL ASHMAN ( LADY HAREWOOD) was assigned to Dr F as a brickmaker. Dr F is listed as SYDNEY. 1832
SAMUEL PARKER (CAMDEN 2) assigned as bricklayer. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2211546 APRIL 1833
A carrier to Dr F. JULY 1833 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2212740
To Dr F a blacksmith http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2215740

 

 

FOR MORE 19th CENTURY AUSTRALIAN INFO :  http://melindakendall.wordpress.com/

FOR BRITISH GENEALOGY: http://www.british-genealogy.com/forums/index.php

 

 

ANN MORAN CURTIS : FOLLOWING THE DEATH OF JOHN

 

ANN MORAN CURTIS : FOLLOWING THE DEATH OF JOHN

FROM PHIL READY’S READY OR NOT.

In his will JOHN CURTIS left everything to ANN in trust for his children, ELIZABETH, JAMES, JOHN, PETER and CATHERINE.

Ann having an equal portion in the rest. To his married daughter ELIZABETH READY he also left 10 head of cattle.

This left 26 head of cattle and 2 mares, a certain house in the township of PARRAMATTA , and a 30 acre farm along the SYDNEY ROAD which he had bought from JAMES WRIGHT. These were to be divided as evenly as possible between ANN and the children but if ANN were to remarry ad the childrens’ shares become endangered , then his friends, JOHN LACEY and THOMAS GARTY were to become the guardians of his children’s property until they were able to look after their own interests. Witnesses to his signature were JOHN LACEY, THOMAS GARTY and his son-in-law JOHN READY.

Two months after John’s death, a letter came from J MEEHAN ordering him to remove his herds etc from his land at TOONGABBIE as it was now required by the Government. ( NSW COL SEC in letters p 14 reel 2167 ) .

ANN had received a grant of 100 acres at PARRAMATTA ( Vol 18 p 169) and was leasing two small blocks nearby one of 36 perches ( Vol 16 pp 339 and one of 38 perches Vol 16 p 231 ) In 1822 she is reported as supplying yeast for the prisoner’s barracks at PARRAMATTA (A 766 p 2 ML)

As ANN’S brewing licence had expired although her eyesight had been damaged in an accident she went to SYDNEY on 5 MARCH 1822 to renew the licence. Upon her return she found that her brewery with most of its stock had been destroyed by fire. There was always the danger of this happening for at that time there were only wood fires for cooking or oil lamps for lighting. The fire was put out with the help of several people and in the 14th March Edition of the AUSTRALIAN Ann thanked them for their help. At the same time she circulated a petition for help from the local populace to get started in business again so that she could feed her children. ( petition to the people of SYDNEY from ANN CURTIS )

The 16 October 1822 edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE carried an advertisement from Ann advertising that she was leaving the Colony but in November that year a court case COOPER V CURTIS took place with the verdict being found in favour of COOPER.

On the 10 November 1822, J T CAMPBELL placed a notice in the SYDNEY GAZETTE,

Pursuant to levy I will cause to be set up and sold. one Cow and calf, 1 pig,a small quantity of sugar and sundry household items of furniture . I will further sell by auction at my office in HUNTER STREET at 12 noon the defendant CURTIS’ right, title and interest in and to the house wherein she now resides situated near the Turnpike gate at PARRAMATTA on the road leading to WINDSOR being on a corner of the road leading to the ORPHAN SCHOOL.

On Tuesday 25 November 1823 JOHN CURTIS’ request for land was granted ( too late for JOHN ) : 80 acres at PILGRIM HILL, LIBERTY PLAINS. (Bk p 4 D 225 ) . The following year 1824 on page 4 of the 19th February Edition of the SYDNEY GAZETTE Ann’s home was again advertised for sale and she moved to the 30 acre farm on SYDNEY ROAD where in 1826 she was listed as  property owner ( Wentworth Papers A 767 p39).

As soon as he was old enough PETER CURTIS was apprenticed as a BUTCHER to WILLIAM SHARP in HUNTER ST SYDNEY and on 5 DECEMEBER 1828 gave sworn evidence for SHARP when SHARP was accused of dishonesty. Apparently Sharp was unable to read and signed a document read out to him by one BENJAMIN KIRKBY purported to be an agreement to lease a house which Kirkby was about to take from one MERRITH. it later turned out that what Kirkby had really tricked Sharp into signing was a bill of exchange for 50 pounds and it was only because of PETER being there at the time that he was able to appear as a witness for SHARP.

By 1828 John and Ann Curtis’ eldest son JAMES had reached the age of 22 and had met and courted MARY PARSONS born in the Colony in 1811. During the year they were joined in marriage and set up home together.

When the Census was taken in November of 1828, there were only 15 year old Catherine, Ann and 72 year old JOHN BRYAN left living at the SYDNEY ROAD property. Bryan had arrived on Sat 15 Feb 1806 aboard the TELLICHERRY and was working as a labourer for ANN.

(This census shows ANN as arriving on the ATLAS but careful research shows that none of the three Anns who arrived aboard that ship married a CURTIS. AS THE ATLAS and HERCULES had left the same port on the same day sailing most of the way together it is reasonable to assume that a mistake has been made in the entry.)

1829 saw the birth of a son JOHN HENRY to JAMES and MARY CURTIS and to ELIZABETH READY who had given birth to a daughter in 1826, a son- PETER MARK READY.

WHAT part if any ANN played in the events that shook the family in 1829-30 is not known but one day in 1830 her son-in-law JOHN READY arrived at her farm with some cattle which were branded JC on their rumps . These beasts he left at the farm and departed. The next day they were removed by the Police. Later JEREMIAH DALEY who lived at the farm testified that JOHN READY was the one who brought them there.

Two years later on 6 October at the age of 60, ANN died and was buried at the SYDNEY BURIAL GROUND, at that time where central Railway Station now stands. About 73 years after ANN’S burial, when the land was required to build the Railway Station and tracks her remains were transferred to the PIONEER SECTION of BOTANY CEMETERY where her headstone still stands today among those of numerous well known early settlers. 

 

2. JOHN CURTIS MARRIED 1814 TO ANN  MORAN

1 1803 ELIZABETH MARRIED 1820 TO JOHN READY
2 1806 JAMES MARRIED 1828 TO MARY PARSONS
3 1807 JOHN  
4 1811 PETER MARRIED 1842 TO ADELA AUSTIN
5 1814 CATHERINE MARRIED 1833 TO GEORGE ECCLESTON

JAMES CURTIS became a very successful cabinetmaker, upholsterer and UNDERTAKER carrying on his business in HUNTER STREET , SYDNEY and several times having to move into larger premises. After the death of his wife MARY in 1848, JAMES with a family of 7 children to care for remarried , his wife being ELLEN SWEENEY.

CATHERINE continued to live at the SYDNEY ROAD property until she married GEORGE ECCLESTON who had arrived in NSW as a soldier and was later a founding member of the NSW MOUNTED POLICE.

Very little is know of JOHN CURTIS JNR and although there is an interesting story of a JOHN CURTIS who was executed in 1828 for stealing a cow at BRINGELLY belonging to W C WENTWORTH, the account does not appear to tie up with our JOHN whom I believe was in the MOLONGOLO PLAINS AREA where he advertised in 1844 for three lost horses which had strayed. It was to this general area that PETER CURTIS and GEORGE ECCLESTON moved after their respective marriages with George setting up his cattle station BLACKFOREST near COOMA and PETER running a very successful cattle and butchering business there . The last known of JOHN JNR was at DIAMOND CREEK in VICTORIA . After that there were too many JOHN CURTIS’ to distinguish one from another.

PETER CURTIS raised a family of four girls and one son  and lived until 1885 , his wife ADELAIDE, having died in 1875 at the age of 52. 

CATHERINE and GEORGE ECCLESTON had a family of two boys and eight girls. both George and Catherine died in 1882. George on the 18 May and Catherine on 22 September at the age of 62.

THE NSW BEGINNINGS ARE WITH JOHN CURTIS AND ANN MORAN.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626806

No person whatever is to pass through or

into the Town of Parramatta, either by

night or day, with a musket , who has not

the Magistrate’s permission for that purpose.

By Command of His Excellency,

G. Blaxcell Acting Sec.

June 7, 1805

JOHN AND ANN PART 2. PARRAMATTA

FROM PHIL READY’S READY OR NOT.

KING’S successor WILLIAM BLIGH had even more trouble with MACARTHUR and the NSW CORPS as he was more interested in discipline than seeing the officers get rich for he well remembered the mutiny of his crew on the BOUNTY. So while JOHN and ANN  worked hard to build a future for their family which had grown to five with the birth of two sons, JAMES and JOHN, friction was building up between BLIGH and MACARTHUR.

The smaller settlers and emancipists  whom the Corps despised, backed BLIGH as he tried to bring the Corps under control and stop them abusing the privileges they had squeezed from his predecessors. On Friday 1st January 1808 as evidence of their backing they penned an address of loyalty to him , which JOHN CURTIS also signed.

Unfortunately, under the threat of financial ruin along with other signatories, John was forced to retract and sign another in favour of MAJOR JOHNSTON when MCARTHUR and the more influential settlers , feeling threatened by Bligh, persuaded Johnston to depose BLIGH and assume command himself ( Banks papers. vol 622 captan bligh and nsw corps 1906 1811 p 301).

As no provision had been made for settlers by the English Government when setting up the prison Colony, there was a great shortage of coins at this period so coins from other nationalities were put into use and IOUS and PROMISSORY NOTES came into circulation. John Curtis was unfortunate enough to lose one of these promissary notes and during March 1809 advertised in the papers for its return. ( Check the details on  https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/08/21/st-johns-church-parramatta-john-curtis-and-ann-moran/. They read a little differently with access to NLA ).

Leaving Lt Gov Patterson in charge McArthur and Johnston made the mistake of going to England to explain their actions to the English Government which was not amused by the way they had deposed BLIGH. Major Johnston was casheered and John McArthur exiled from the Colony for 8 years.

___________________________________________-

On 17th December  1809 JOHN CURTIS was notified that Lt Gov Patterson had granted him land at Parramatta. Eleven Days later Lachlan Macquarie Bligh’s replacement arrived and within a few weeks had assessed the situation and cancelled everything that had been done officially since Johnston had deposed Bligh ; all land grants, appointments and trials. It had been decided that the NSW CORPS was to become one of the ordinary regiments of the British Army and sent home.

With staggering speed Macquarie started to clean up the mess he had inherited for he found the population continually threatened with starvation, the buildings decaying and the morals of most of the population in the lowest state of debasement whilst religious worship seemed to be in a state of almost total neglect. Arrival of the grain ship MARIAN a fortnight after Macquaries arrival followed by a mild autumn and bounteous spring partly relieved the problem of feeding the starving community and Macquarie was able to concentrate on other matters needing his attention.

Cancellation of all land grants made during the rebel’s rule meant that JOHN CURTIS too lost the land granted to him by Lt Col Gov Patterson so he wrote a memorial to Gov Macquarie seeking confirmation of the grant. ( sm folio pp 4 1810 NSW Colonial Sec in letters and memorials 1810 AK NO 80 REEL 1066 AONSW). Macquarie as was his way when dealing with those he considered worthy emancipists acquiesced.

The skills John was  acquiring in the Colony coupled with those he had learned as an accountant in England were coming in handy and life was improving steadily for he appears to have been able to use some of the Government Land at the dairy for his own cattle. Ann  too was proving to be a marvellous help and mother and on Wed 3rd July 1811 gave birth to their third son PETER. This was ANN’s 4th child but John’s 16th, two of his English children had died before he left England leaving 5 sons and 5 daughters there.

During March 1812 there were again heavy rains and the Hawkesbury rose 12 feet over its banks. Flood years seemed to stir John’s spirit for on 7th December he further petitioned the Governor , this time for a free pardon which was granted. (NSW COL SEC IN LETTERS Petitions mitigating sentences 1811 – 1812 pp 110-111 reels 1227 and 612 ) (register of pardons and tickets of leave Vol 1 p 183 Col Sec papers COD ML ).

As cattle were always straying through the burial grounds  behind St Johns Church Parramatta, an appeal for funds towards enclosing the grounds was made, to which JOHN CURTIS subscribed ( Sydney Gazette Jan 1813).

On Tuesday 16 August 1814 in a ceremony at St Johns Church at Parramatta witnessed by Chistopher Grogan and Margaret Neale , JOHN CURTIS and ANN MORAN were married. This ceremony was followed by the baptism of 3 year old PETER and his baby sister CATHERINE ( Kitty) born on 7th June that year ( 1814) . A muster taken at this time lists JOHN, ANN and these 2 children as still being supplied from Govt Stores whilst the other 3 children were not.

The CURTIS children grew as the years passed with all helping out on the farm as they became able . Elizabeth blossomed into a young woman and JOHN READY  who lived nearby became interested in  her.  In 1829 when ELIZABETH was 17 and JOHN READY was 30 they were married.

With other ROMAN CATHOLIC members of the community, JOHN CURTIS signed a petition to J T  BIGGE for a ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPEL when Bigges came out to the Colony to investigate and report on how it was going. ( 20 Feb 1820 Bigges Report app p 3943).

Because of John’s advanced age,( he was now 72), ANN CURTIS set up business for herself. On 21 April 1821 she paid into the POLICE FUND for 6 months brewing licence and a retailing licence ( Wenworth Papers dip 228).

Almost six months later on Wed 12 September 1821 , John Curtis died and was laid to rest in the BURIAL GROUND behind ST JOHNS CHURCH PARRAMATTA.

  

 

 

 

SOME MORE SANDERS STORY FROM JAN AND BARRY MAURICE

1. WILLIAM SANDERS m SARAH STARK c 1768 probably at Tifford outside KENTON near EXETER DEVON.

2. Their son  WILLIAM was baptised on 11/11/1792 at Tifford and was probably born the same day or the day before according to the custom of the time. He later married ELIZABETH GREEN. Their son :

3. WILLIAM was born at KENTON on 15/4/1823. He married MARY ANN SKIVINGS who was born in 1830. Mary’s parents were both born at KILLERTON ( also known as Broad Clyst) near EXETER, Devon.  Her mother, GRACE, was born in 1804. William and Mary  arrived in Sydney on board the VICTORIA on 2/9/1849, Mary possibly pregnant with their first ( surviving ) child.

They settled in the MACLEAY DISTRICT. Oral history has it that William was invited to come to Australia by a retired British Army Colonel to be employed as an expert ploughman having become known as such back in Devon. William is also reputed to have introduced blackberries to the North Coast. This act of folly earned him the nickname ” BLACKBERRY BILL”. William was also a champion rower and rowed in the Kempsey Regatta of 1856. William died on 19/12/1910 aged 87. Mary died on 13/11/1882 aged 52, the mother of 13 children.

Husband    WILLIAM SANDERS   

Birth    Apr. 15, 1823    KENTON DEVON ENGLAND   
Marriage    Aug. 28, 1848    EXETER ENGLAND   
Death    Dec. 19, 1910    FREDERICKTON KEMPSEY   
Burial        FREDERICKTON   
Other Wives       
Parents    WILLIAM SANDERS and ELIZABETH GREEN

Wife    MARY ANN SKIVINGS   

Birth    About 1830    SILVERTON DEVON ENGLAND   
Death    Nov. 13, 1882    FREDRICKTON KEMPSEY NSW AUSTRALIA   
Burial        FREDERICKTON CEMETERY   
Other Husbands       
Parents    GEORGE S SKIVINGS and GRACE 

Children  

1    ELIZABETH GRACE SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Oct. 28, 1850    HORSLEY NSW   
Husband    EDRED EVERSON   
Marriage    Aug. 3, 1868    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Jan. 30, 1904    KINCHELA NSW   
Burial    

2    HARRIET FRANCES SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jun. 4, 1852    YARRABANDINI NSW   
Husband    THOMAS ROWE   
Marriage    Dec. 6, 1869    KINCHELA NSW   
Death    Oct. 13, 1942    DUNGOG   
Burial        

3    WILLIAM GEORGE SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Feb. 11, 1854    YARRABANDINI NSW   
Wife    ELIZABETH HURELL   
Marriage    Jul. 30, 1879    KINCHELA NSW   
Death    Aug. 10, 1923    SOUTH WEST ROCKS NSW AUSTRALIA   
Burial    

4    FREDERICK JOHN SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Oct. 18, 1855    MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Wife    LUCY JANE HURRELL   
Marriage    Apr. 11, 1878    KINCHELA   
Death    Jan. 23, 1921    MARRICKVILLE SYDNEY AUSTRALIA   
Burial   

5    CHARLES HENRY SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jan. 1, 1860    AUSTRAL EDEN   
Wife    MARY ANN PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Aug. 17, 1881    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Jul. 16, 1926    MACKSVILLE   
Burial    

6    ALFRED SIVERT SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jan. 4, 1861    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Wife    EMILY JANE MINCHEN   
Marriage    Apr. 29, 1886    SMITHTOWN   
Death    1933    KEMPSEY   
Burial  

7    ERNEST ALBERT SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Dec. 21, 1862    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Wife    ANNIE JANE PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Jun. 9, 1886    SUMMER ISLAND MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Death    Nov. 20, 1911    UPPER UNKYA   
Burial    

8   MARY ANN SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Nov. 17, 1864    FLATTORINI ISLAND   
Husband    JOSEPH ISAAC HARRIS   
Marriage    Jun. 7, 1885    AUSTRAL EDEN   
Death    Dec. 4, 1941    BRISBANE   
Burial  

9    WALTER THOMAS SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Mar. 18, 1867    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife    ELIZABETH PARTRIDGE   
Marriage    Jul. 10, 1895    KEMPSEY   
Death    Jan. 24, 1922    KEMPSEY   
Burial    

10    AGNES JANE SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jul. 9, 1869    KINCHELA CREEK MACLEAY RIVER NSW   
Husband    CHARLES HENRY WILLIAM  TAYLOR   
Marriage    Nov. 25, 1891    ST LEONARDS   
Death    Aug. 6, 1951    QUEENSLAND   
Burial        LUTWYCHE CEMETERY BRISBANE  

11    EDRED JAMES SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Oct. 2, 1870    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife    ANNIE EDITH NELSON   
Marriage    Dec. 25, 1912    WEST KEMPSEY NSW AUSTRALIA   
Death    Mar. 26, 1938    KEMPSEY   
Burial    

12   SARAH ELLEN SANDERS   

Gender    Female   
Birth    Jan. 27, 1872    KINCHELA CREEK   
Husband    ROBERT EVAN KITCHING   
Marriage    Oct. 26, 1895    SYDNEY AUSTRALIA   
Death    Feb. 9, 1946    CAMPBELLTOWN   
Burial 

13    CHRISTOPHER GEORGE SANDERS   

Gender    Male   
Birth    Jul. 3, 1873    KINCHELA CREEK   
Wife       
Marriage           
Death    Jan. 3, 1882    KINCHELA CREEK   
Burial       

 

   

 

      

 

      

         

   

 

SANDERS MISCELLANEOUSLY IN THE 1850s IN THE NLA NEWS

SANDERS ARE HERE.

1850 – THE SHIP, THE ROMAN EMPEROR , ARRIVES FROM THE DOWNS AND PLYMOUTH AND ON BOARD IS MR GEORGE SANDERS AS A PASSENGER. MOST LIKELY NOT ONE OF OURS. WE TEND TO ARRIVE ASSISTED IN ONE WAY OR ANOTHER AND NOT LISTED AS MR OR MRS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article697056

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 16 January 1850, page 2.

1850  – A MR SANDERS SAILS INTO SYDNEY  AS PASSENGER FROM PORT PHILLIP ON THE FRANCIS RIDLEY.
THERE IS ALSO A CAPTAIN SAUNDERS IN THIS ARTICLE – MASTER OF A BARGQUE CALLED THE CAPE HORN – BUT I AM NOT EVEN GOING NEAR THE SANERS/SAUNDERS DEBATE AT THE MOMENT.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article690078

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 14 September 1850,

1854 –  A VERY ANGRY J SANDERS, PUBLICAN IN ARMIDALE,  PROTESTS THE ACCUSATION BROUGHT AGAINST HIM RE THE SERVING OF ALCOHOL TO AN INTOXICATED MAN . IN TYPICAL SANDERS MAN HE DECLARES

IF THIS BE JUSTICE – FAREWELL LIBERTY.

AND REFUSES TO RENEW HIS LICENCE. 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article688195

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 15 April 1854, page 3.

SANDERS MISCELLANY IN NLA NEWSPAPERS : 1849 AND WILLIAM AND MARY ANN ARRIVE ON THE VICTORIA.

Now we look at the era 1849 onwards. The shipping indents say that neither WILLIAM nor MARY ANN had any living relatives in the Colony. Just to remind you.  However, later research indicates that they went to the property of THOMAS SANDERS who came as convict in 1791. Out west of Sydney.

NSW STATE ARCHIVES  REEL 58

ASSISTED IMMIGRANTS INWARDS TO SYDNEY PER SHIP VICTORIA ARRIVED 2nd SEP 1849

SAUNDERS, WILLIAM –  26 YEAR OLD BUTCHER BORN KENTON DEVONSHIRE SON OF WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH SAUNDERS – STILL LIVING IN KENTON C OF E. READS AND WRITES NO RELATIONS LIVING IN COLONY IN GOOD HEALTH. COMPLAINED OF SHORT ISSUE OF RATIONS DURING EARLY PART OF VOYAGE

 

SAUNDERS MARY ANN – 19 YEARS FARM SERVANT BORN SILVERTON DEVONSHIRE DAUGHTER OF GEORGE AND GRACE SKIVINGS STILL LIVING IN SILVERTON C OF E READS AND WRITES NO RELATIONS IN COLONY IN GOOD HEALTH.

__________________________________________________________

 

 

MARY ANN SKIVINGS
MARY ANN SKVINGS SANDERS CAME FREE ON THE VICTORIA WITH WILLIAM

SANDERS MEN BLACKBERRY , FRED J, FRED W , ESSEL REECE

BLACKBERRY BILL AND HIS LADS

SANDERS AS I HAVE FOUND THEM IN THE

NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIAN HISTORIC

NEWSPAPERS

NO KNOWN CONNECTION TO OUR FAMILY :

HOWEVER – ONE NEVER KNOWS.

1849 – AND A MR E SANDERS IS LISTED AS AN EMIGRATION AGENT IN ANDOVER ( ENGLAND ) The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 3 February 1849, page 2.
1849 – A MR E SANDER WAS LEAVING SYDNEY ON THE STEAMER SHAMROCK FOR MELBOURNE, TWOFOLD BAY AND LAUNCESTON.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article705017
1849 –

Married. On the 19th May, by special license, at St. Paul’s Church, Port Adelaide, by the Rev. G. C. Newenham, Captain Thomas Sanders, of the barque Margaret Brock, to Margaret, eldest daughter of Mr. W. Galway, of Port Adelaide, and formerly of West Maitland.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article702341

1849 –

26th day of November.

conditional pardons.

His Excellency the Governor has directed it to be notified, that her Majesty has been graciously pleased to authorise the issue of pardons to the undermentioned persons, on condition that during the remainder of the term of their respective sentences, they do not return to the countries or colonies from which they were respectively transported, as hereunder more particularly specified. Dated 20th September, 1849. Pardons available everywhere, save in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland,

SANDERS, SUSAN.

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article699166

SUSAN SANDERS in the 1950s
 60 susan as a french lady
PARDONED FOR WHAT ?

MORE SANDERS MISCELLANY IN THE NLA NEWSPAPERS.

SANDERS AS I HAVE FOUND THEM IN THE

NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIAN HISTORIC

NEWSPAPERS

NO KNOWN CONNECTION TO OUR FAMILY :

HOWEVER – ONE NEVER KNOWS.

1840 – MEANWHILE IN PERTH, WILLIAM SANDERS HAS ANOTHER ALLOTMENT RESUMED – FOR NOT FULFILLING THE CONDITIONS THIS TIME. LOT NO. 39.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article642480

1843 – ST PATRICK’S TEMPERANCE SOCIETY – MEETS IN EAST MAITLAND AND A DELIGHTFUL EVENING IT APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN – INCLUDING  A MR SANDERS AMOMGST OTHERS WHO ENTERTAINED WITH SONGS.

THE TEMPERANCE SOCIETY HAD APPARENTLY REDUCED THE RIOT AND DRUNKENNESS IN MAITLAND DURING THE PREVIOUS FOUR YEARS. PRIOR TO THAT SCENES OF INFAMY WERE COMMON.

ST. PATRICK’S.TEMPERANCE FESTIVAL.

On Tuesday evening last the members of St. Patrick’s Total Abstinence Society, East Maitland, gave a tea party in the large barn belonging to the late Mr. Riley, of that place, which was very tastefully fitted up with evergreens, flowers, and banners’ for the occasion. About 200 persons sat down to tea ; a band was in attendance, which during the evening enlivened the proceedings by playing several popular airs. The arrangements reflected great credit on the parties concerned in getting up the meeting, which presented a highly respectable and decorous appearance

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article661631

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 12 August 1843, page 4.

 

 

TEMPERANCE IS IT ?

30 7 bruce

BRUCE SANDERS 1940s.

1843- In WEST MAITLAND DANIEL RICHARDSON – HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTER – TAKES OVER THE PREMISES WHERE MR SANDERS HAD BEEN OPERATING AS A COMBMAKER. JUST NEAR THE SCOTS CHURCH IT WAS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article662944
1844 –  meanwhile – OVERSEAS – ON THE INDIAN FRONT –

Col. Sanders, Assistant Military Secretary to the Governor General and acting Aid-de-camp to the Commander-in-Chief, received a shot through the heart and died instantly.

THAT WAS AT GWALIOR ABOUT 60 MILES SOUTH OF AGRA .

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article645008

The Perth Gazette and… Saturday 13 April 1844, page 2.

1845 – IN WEST MAITLAND WHERE NOT LONG BEFORE MR SANDERS HAD SUNG AT THE TEMPERANCE TEA PARTY , A MYSTERIOUS AND SUSPICIOUS DEATH TAKES PLACE. YOUNG GUILDFORD SANDERS ( SON OF JOHN SANDERS ) IS BROUGHT HOME INTOXICATED AND PUT TO BED. THIS IS A GOOD READ. THERE ARE HINTS OF FOUL PLAY AND LAUDANUM. A POST MORTEM IS HELD AND A BLUE MARK FOUND ON HIS SKULL .

WAS IT INTOXICATION , DRUGS OR THE FALL FROM THE GIG WHICH LED TO HIS DEATH ?

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article673671

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 31 May 1845, page 2.

1846 – JAMES SANDERS APPEARS AT THE BENCH ACCUSING HIS MASTER Robert Pringle, of Carrington Park, Jerry’s Plains, of non- payment of £4 balance of wages. PRINGLE IS REPRESENTED BY A MR SAUNDERS. IT IS TO DO WITH A LOST COW. READ THE ARTICLE TO DISCOVER THE OUTCOME. IT WAS SAID TO BE A VERY OLD COW.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article681248

1846 – FROM CAMBRIDGE – A SANDERS IS ROWING. IN LATER YEARS WILLIAM BLACKBERRY SANDERS IS KNOWN AS A FINE ROWER ON THE MACLEAY IN AUSTRALIA.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article684672

1846 – IN A FINE CASE OF PERJURY. A DENNIS DUNNEEN ACCUSES A MAN BY THE NAME OF BULMER OF SETTING FIRE TO MR CHRISTIAN’S HAYSTACK. DENNIS IT SEEMS WAS IN HOPE OF A FIFTY POUND REWARD  POSTED BY MY CHRISTIAN AND ATTEMPTED TO DO SO BY FALSELY ACCUSING GEORGE BULMER. BULMER HOWEVER HAD A LAME FOOT AT THE TIME AND WAS ALSO IN A KITCHEN IN COMPANY WITH A ‘ MAN NAMED SANDERS’  AND COULD NOT HAVE SET THE FIRE AT ALL. 7 YEARS TRANSPORTATION FOR YOU DENNIS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article684751

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 19 September 1846

1846 – MRS  SANDERS ON THE HUNTER CONTRIBUTES 2/6 TO THE IRISH RELIEF FUND.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article685224

1847 – FROM THE USA – SPOT SANDERS AND HIS FAMILY ARE POISONED BY  WILKINSON WHO HAD TRIED TO STEAL SPOT’S HOGS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article694767

1847 –

Cabinet Woods.-We happen to have
seen (not long ago) some cabinet specimens
of South Australian woods, prepared and
polished for transmission to an eminent
colonial land proprietor in England, and
destined to accompany a collection of
minerals. The conjoint selection was a most
judicious one, as eminently calculated to
raise the colony in British estimation. We
understand, some new discoveries of beauti-
fully variegated stone and marble have lately
been made in the Mount Barker district, and
that wrought or polished specimens will
shortly be prepared for inspection By Mr.
Sanders
, of Grenfell-Btreet.-Register.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article689710

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 5 May 1847, page 2

1847 –

A list of unclaimed letters for the month of July, 1847, addressed to persons resident in the Hunter River district : –

SANDERS, WILLIAM, CARRINGTON.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article692463

1848 –

LOST, on the way from Stroud to Maitland, on the 10th January, a POCKET BOOK, containing memoranda, ice., and the ORDERS, CHEQUES, &c, mentioned in the following list, the payment of which having been stopped, all parties are hereby
cautioned against negotiating the same.

The names Bell and SANDERS appear amongst the cheques lost by the Rev Rusden.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article713714

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 22 January 1848, page 1

This issue also mentions the sale of two ENTIRE horses . ENTIRE ?

 

 

BRUCE SANDERS IN THE 1920s  

20 11 bruce sulking

NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS !

 

LYNNE SANDERS-BRAITHWAITE

 

SANDERS IN THE NEWSPAPERS : AN NLA MISCELLANY.

SANDERS AS I HAVE FOUND THEM IN THE

NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIAN HISTORIC

NEWSPAPERS

NO KNOWN CONNECTION TO OUR FAMILY :

HOWEVER – ONE NEVER KNOWS.

1809 – Nichols, Principal Superintendant. Secretary’s Office, Sydney, Nov. 11, 1809 GRANTS and LEASES are ready to be delivered  on Application :

THOMAS SANDERS

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627860

1810 – THOMAS SANDERS issues a warning against buying anything from a man called Barnett.  George Barnett.

The Public are hereby cautioned against buying or purchasing from George Barnett, a Farm, at the Hawkesbury, known by the name of Boston’s Farm, at Mulgrave Place, or any thing on the said Farm ; together with a Mare, Cart, and Harness, they being my Property., (signed) Thomas Sanders.

We believe THOMAS SANDERS who came on MATILDA in 1791 ( THIRD FLEET) was one of our SANDERS’ from DEVON, ENGLAND. It is thought that Mary Ann and William Sanders stayed with him at APPIN NSW when they came on the VICTORIA in 1849.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627956

 

1817 – MR SANDERS makes a donation to the Auxilliary Bible Society of NSW.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177226

1817 – Women who had absconded from their employment as Government Servants ( i.e convicts) included MARY SANDERS. She is listed just above Pirates who were also on the run.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177630

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 28 February 1818, page 2

JOHN SANDERS is next listed as being a prisoner who has absconded from his employment. Constables & etc are directed to “use their utmost endeavours to apprehend ” John, Mary and the rather large number of other absconders. Well , there are a large number listed with Mary.

With JOHN SANDERS there are two others named. JOHN CARTER and EDWARD SCARR. People are strongly warned against helping them out in any way.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628493

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 23 May 1812, page 4.

1820 -AN UNDELIVERED LETTER FROM THE SARACEN AWAITS GEORGE SANDERS  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179483

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 27 May 1820, page 3.

1821 – 28th April 1821 – THOS SANDERS Jnr IS LISTED amongst new settlers who are to receive land and old settlers who are to receive additional lands.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2180253

 

THOMAS HUNT and JOHN SANDERS leaving the Colony in the Claudine, request all Claims to be presented.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179397

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 12 May 1821, page 2.

1821 – SANDERS and two other constables are paid 5 pounds 8 shillings for executing a bench warrant. Paid from the Police Fund.
Also – Anthony Sanders, Services rendered the Police – 3 0 0
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2180081

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 17 February 1821 Supplement: Supplementary

1822- MARY SANDERS is now listed as a settler at PROSPECT. She , amongst others is to supply the Commissariat at Parramatta with 30 bushels of wheat. This is indeed the area to which Mary Ann and William go in 1849. Where was Mary when she was listed as absconding ?

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2180743

The Sydney Gazette and… Friday 11 January 1822

1823 – TICKET OF LEAVE FOR ANTHONY SANDERS otherwise ALLEN SUTTON – HADLOW I.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2181865
1823 – JAMES SANDERS IS LEAVING THE COLONY IN THE BRIG WELLINGTON AND ASKS FOR ALL CLAIMS TO BE PRESENTED.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2181741
1824 –  RICHARD SANDERS ( FAME) Liverpool.- TICKET OF LEAVE  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2182704
1825 – WILLIAM SANDERS (PRINCE REGENT I)  RECEIVES A CERTIFICATE.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2183689
1825 – A MARE GOES MISSING AND A REWARD OF 8 DOLLARS IS OFFERED. THOMAS SANDERS AT PROSPECT IS ONE OF THE 2 PEOPLE TO BE NOTIFIED IF INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2184815

1826 – WILLIAM SANDERS – PRISONER OF THE CROWN.
Working for JOHNSTON of ANNADALE –  was charged on evidence of another servant with purloining a leg of mutton FROM THE KITCHEN. He resisted the constable who came to arrest him and also assaulted him. 60  lashes he was sentenced to for that leg of mutton.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2184979

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 5 January 1826, page 2.

1833 – A WILLIAM SANDERS (  NOT OUR WILLIAM ) RECEIVES AN ALLOTMENT IN GUILDFORD , PERTH.  AND JOHN SANDERS RECEIVES ONE IN FREMANTLE.

LATER IN 1833 , WILLIAM SURRENDERS HIS ALLOTMENT TO THE CROWN.

HOWEVER , THAT WAS LOT 121. LATER AGAIN HE IS ALLOTED Y39 IN PERTH ITSELF.

IN 1834 HE RECEIVES ANOTHER ALLOTMENT. THIS TIME IT IS No. 54 IN ALBANY.

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article642059

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article641880

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article641799

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article641536

1834 – W H SANDERS IMPORTS ON THE QUEBEC TRADER – ONE CASE.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article641537

The Perth Gazette and… Saturday 26 April 1834, page 274

 

 

LYNNE BELL SANDERS

IN THIS YEAR : 1797 : JOHN CURTIS COMES ON THE GANGES

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article656255

The Hobart Town Gazette… Saturday 1 May 1819, page 2.

Account of prosecutions for forging Bank of England Notes, taken from the returns of the Bank Solicitor :-From 1783 to 1796 inclusive, there were 3 capital convictions and 1 acquittal, being only 4 prosecutions in 14 years- From 1797 to the 25th February 1818, there were 313 persons capitally convicted, 521 for having forged notes in their possession, and 164 acquittals, being 998 prosecutions in the space of 21 years ; of which 288 happened since the beginning of 1816,

20 16 jack jessie joyce & jean 1927

JACK, JOYCE AND JEAN WITH JESSIE SARAH NEE (READY) BELL

1927 : DESCENDANTS OF JOHN CURTIS.

 

 

 

See General Orders of March 10, 1797, and January 14,1804), with details of the rights of convict servants inc rates of pay,rations, hours etc.

 

 

                  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1089944

 

 

 

IN THIS YEAR : 1791 : THOMAS SANDERS COMES ON MATILDA 3RD FLEET

ALSO IN THIS YEAR :

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626603

GENERAL ORDERS FEB 11 1791

The selling or exchanging of The Provisions issued to Convicts is strictly forbidden. Seems they had been trading for tobacco, grog and money and then distressing other persons by robbing their gardens.

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626184 By 1804 , the Secretary’s Office in Sydney  asking

” ANY person knowing whether JOHN BURDETT, who came out to this Colony in the Britannia in 1791, is dead or has left the Colony ”

to let them know toute suite.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article674110

Maitland Mercury… Saturday 21 June 1845

IN 1845,

Preservative Powers of Guano.-Captain Withers, of the ship Colchester, brought home with him from Ichaboe the skeleton of a Portuguese sailor, buried there in 1791. Every part of it was in a a state of perfect preservation. The empty hammock and linen found with it were perfectly sound and strong, whilst the wool and flannel about it crumbled to pieces at the touch.

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article709089

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 23 September 1848, page 3

Connexions of France and Ireland.-The Count de Montalembert, in his letter to Mr. J.O’Connell, talks of the ancient connexions between France and Ireland. These are stronger
than the English people understand. From 1691 to 1791 fifteen thousand Irish were constantly in the French service.

_________________________________________________

 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1278406

MR MUIR ARRIVED FROM SCOTLAND. A REFORMER AND THE MAN WHO NAMED HUNTERS HILL

_____________________________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article640310

A VISIT TO SCHEFFER’S FARM IN DECEMBER 1791.

AND TO THE FARM OF CONVICT CHRISTOPHER MAGEE.

_______________________________________________________

WELL WELL UNCLE TOM !20 6 bruce 06
BRUCE SANDERS IN THE 1920s

 

 

and HUMBOLDT TELLS OF GIANT TREES HE SAW IN SENEGAL IN 1791

THE TREE OF 1000 YEARS

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1298785

IMMIGRATION REPORT 1852

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article671085

 

IMMIGRATION REPORT FOR 1852 INCLUDING STATISTICS FOR THE WHOLE PERIOD OF EMIGRATION.

VERY DETAILED PROFILE OF IMMIGRATION IN AUSTRALIA.

 

(The following year 1853 sees the arrival of the CRAIGS, HURRELLS and JACKSONS. )

 

wilhelmina mcleod 

WILHELMINA MCLEOD

20 12 some indians

WHERE HAVE WE COME FROM ?

THE SANDERS AND IMMIGRATION

I have had information about the Sanders for years now but not put it together. Now I am accessing the Newspapers and understanding a little more of what was involved in the emigration/immigration process, I shall write out some of the details I have and see how they fit with the NLA Articles.

William Sanders married Mary Ann Skivings and they emigrated to Australia.  They sailed from Plymouth on the ship VICTORIA and arrived in SYDNEY on September 4th, 1849 ( 100 years before I was born). Their shipping papers state that they had no relations living in the Colony ( this is disputed re THOMAS SANDERS at Appin but neither is verified by primary source as yet) . Dick Sanders found that the property at Appin to which they went on arriving was at PROSPECT ( now known as WENTWORTHVILLE) and was owned by THOMAS SANDERS who had 100 acres there. Elizabeth Grace, their first child was born there.

They then came north alone the NEW ENGLAND HIGHWAY looking for land. From ARMIDALE, they turned East to the Coast and came to the Macleay River. They moved about in this area for about 8 years before William purchased a block of 60 acres  and paid 60 pounds. DATE AUGUST 13 – 1863.

Each of the children was given a block of land to make a living on. William finally transferred the land to two of his sons, WALTER THOMAS  and EDRED JAMES on Nov 1 1898. These were two younger sons.

It was through SANDERS land that the road was re-routed to HAT HEAD to avoid swampland.

Dick Sanders said that where the school now stands was SANDERS property. Kinchela School.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

HERE ARE SOME PERSPECTIVES OF IMMIGRATION AT APP THE SAME PERIOD. 1849. FROM THE NLA HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS.

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article712494

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 15 April 1848, page 2.

ARRIVAL OF IMMIGRANTS IN MAITLAND.

By Thursday morning’s mail the Police Magistrate received a letter from the Immigration Agent in Sydney intimating that free passages to Maitland on Thursday evening, with board and lodging until they should receive offers of employment at fair wages, would be offered to as many of the immigrants by the Suhraon as chose to avail themselves of the opportunity of at once proceeding to the country ; and requesting the Police Magistrate to make arrangements to receive those who might be sent. Accordingly, by yesterday’s steamer, 57 of the immigrants reached Maitland, and have been lodged in the house formerly occupied by Mr. Rae, next door to the late Blue Bell Inn, East Maitland ; and are now ready to make engagements. Of the new arrivals, 10 are single men, 10 single women, the remainder married couples

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article708687

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 11 October 1848, page 1

ORPHAN EMIGRANTS.
 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article706650

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 3 January 1849, page 2.

A stream of immigration from the mother country has also once more set in upon us, and, as our immigration debt has been paid off, we have every prospect of a steady accession of population from the same source

 

IMMIGRATION ISSUES 1849

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article706437

    THE COLONIZATION SOCIETY.

    MAITLAND MERCURY SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1849.

 

    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article706387

 

 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article705911

SIR-I came to Maitland last week for the  purpose of hiring a few immigrants. I attended the places where they are quartered, and I could not see more, than six or eight at either place.  In taking a ride over to West Maitland I met them in lots of six or eight, and numbers I saw taking their walks on the race-course. These  walks ought to be taken at times so as not to  inconvenience people that may come to hire  these gentlemen. Some observations on this  subject may cause such restrictions as will  operate for the benefit of all parties.

I remain,

sir, yours truly,

Newcastle, July 14, 1849.

J. S.

The Maitland Mercury… Wednesday 18 July 1849, page 2.

 

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article699943

Immigrants.-On Thursday 124 of the immigrants per Kate arrived in Maitland per steamer, comprising 21 married couples, 19 young men and 11 young women above the age of fourteen years, 13 boys and 8 girls between ten and fourteen years, and 31 children under ten years. Of these there had been hired up to yesterday afternoon four married men, as farm or general servants, one at 6s. per week, and the others at £16, £20, and £23 per year, the two latter having one a son and the other a wife to assist, and the first getting current harvest and reaping wages in those seasons ; seven young men, five as farm servants, at £12, £13, £14, and £16 per year, and two as shepherds, at £16 per year ; and one boy of thirteen years as domestic servant, at £4 the first year and £6 the second ; all these parties having rations or board and lodging, in proportion to services .

 

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 29 September 1849, page 2.

Contracts for 1850.- In the Government Gazette of Tuesday last appear the usual notices calling for tenders for supplies for the colonial service, in such quantities as may be required, during twelve months commencing 1st January, 1850; one notice calls for such tenders for districts within the boundaries, and the other for districts beyond the boundaries, and in both cases tenders will be received at the Colonial Secretary’s Office, Sydney, until twelve o’clock of Monday, 12th November. The districts within the boundaries which are comprised in the Hunter River and,northern districts, are Mudgee, Newcastle and Raymond Terrace, Dungog, Maitland, Wollombi and Macdonald River, Paterson, Patrick’s -Plains, Merton and Muswellbrook, Scone and Murrurundi, and Cassilis. The districts beyond the boundaries comprised in the same portion of the colony, are Bligh, Liverpool Plains, Gwydir, New England, Darling Downs, Clarence River, and Maranoa. In these latter districts it is noted, that the stations at which supplies will be required to be delivered, are-Dubbo, Canamble, and Wiabra, in the district of Bligh ; Tamworth, Wee Waa, and Pockataroo, in the district of Liverpool Plains; Warialda, in the district of Gwydir; Armidale, Wellingrove, and Tenterfield, in the district of New England ; Drayton and Warwick, in the district of Darling Downs ; Grafton and Tabulam, in the district of Clarence River ; in the district of Maranoa no stations are named.