Irish Convicts to Australia

http://www.claimaconvict.net/index.html

 

Lesley Uebel

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http://newsarch.rootsweb.com/th/read/AUS-PT-JACKSON-CONVICTS/2001-10/1001976898

Governor King to the Transport Commissioners
HRA – Aug 1802
Gentlemen,
I had the honor of receiving your letters and their several enclosures dated
as per margin by the Coromandel which arrived here 13th June, Hercules 26th
June, Atlas 6th July and Perseus 4th instant.
The above transports were cleared of all the prisoners, passengers,
provisions and stores, before the time limited for that purpose was expired;
and the Commissary has furnished the respective masters with receipts for
all that was landed here.
The healthy state in which the Coromandel and Perseus arrived requires my
particularly pointing out the masters of those ships to your notice. It
appears by the log books, surgeon’s diaries and the unanimous voice of every
person on board those ships that the utmost kindness had been shown by the
masters and surgeons to the convicts. This, with the proper application of
the comforts Government had so liberally provided for them and the good
state of health all the people were in, induced the master of the Coromandel
to proceed without stopping at any port. He arrived here in four months and
one day, bringing every person in a state of high health, and fit for
immediate labour; and altho’ it appears that the Perseus necessarily
stopped at Rio and the Cape, yet the convicts were in as good condition as
those on board the Coromandel; nor can I omit the great pleasure felt by
myself and the other visiting officers at the grateful thanks expressed by
the prisoners and passengers for the kind attention and care they had
received from the masters and surgeons, who returned, an unusual quantity of
the articles laid in by Government for the convicts during the voyage.
I am sorry that the conduct of the Masters of the Hercules and Atlas appears
to be the reverse of what I have just stated. By the surgeon’s list, and
the masters of the Hercules and Atlas’s letters to me, of which I send you a
copy, you will observe the dreadful mortality that raged on board those
ships, exclusive of the numbers killed. Altho’ there was no mutiny on board
the Atlas, yet in every other respect the master of that vessels conduct
appears as much if not more reprehensible than the other. The miserable
state the survivors were in in both those ships on their arrival in this
port, being filthy beyond description, some of the convicts lying dead with
heavy irons on, many of them died as they were coming from the ship to the
hospital. These circumstances, together with the complaints made against
the masters by the officers, rendered it necessary to investigate the
necessity of their having to put in Rio de Janeiro and the Cape, and how far
the masters had infracted the charter-parties. The result of these
investigations are enclosed. The log books and diaries will be forwarded by
the first direct conveyance mentioned in my letter of the 23rd ultimo.
The master of the Hercules was necessarily tried by a Court of
Vice-Admiralty on two indictments, first for killing ten men in the mutiny,
and afterwards for shooting one man (a ringleader), it was alleged, some
time after the mutiny had subsided. On the first count he was acquitted,
and on the second he was found guilty of manslaughter, and was sentenced by
the Court to pay a fine of 500 Pounds to the Orphan School, and to be
imprisoned until it was paid. As a doubt arose in my mind respecting the
propriety of his being fined, I have given a conditional remission of that
part of the sentence which I have referred to the judge of the Admiralty
Court, for His Majesty’s pleasure being signified thereon; and that the
course of justice may not be perverted (if I am wrong respecting the fine)
the master is bound over to abide by that determination and to surrender
himself within five days after his arrival in the port of London.
The master of the Atlas having such a quantity of private trade and spirits
on board, appears to have produced most of the bad consequences complained
of in that ship. What that private trade consisted of , and the bulk
occupied on board, will be obvious from the enclosed report of that ship’s
entry.
I have judged it necessary to forward this by the Hercules, in case she
should arrive in England before my letters which I mean to send by the
conveyance pointed out in my letter of the 23rd ultimo
I have, etc
Philip Gidley King

SHIP ON WHICH ANN MORAN ARRIVED.

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Mayberry Home Page

http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/

_________________________________________

Wicklow United Irishmen
1797 – 1804

http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/wicklow.htm

THE RISE OF THE DEFENDERS 1793-5

 

http://www.iol.ie/~fagann/1798/dfender3.htm

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Index to the Colonial Secretary’s Papers, 1788-1825

http://colsec.records.nsw.gov.au/indexes/colsec/default.htm

_______________________________________________

Deaths and Mutiny on convict vessels provoke a scandal

http://www.convictcreations.com/history/description.htm

Sydney, August 9. Despite the past disgraces of convict ships, and the regulations and warnings designed to improve their condition, two more vessels have arrived at Sydney in deplorable state, and with awful death rates.
The Hercules arrived on June 26 with the news that 30 convicts had died on the voyage and another 11 had been killed during a mutiny, with two dying later of their wounds and a third being summary executed by the captain.
The Atlas arrived on July 6, having lost 68 people through scurvy and dysentery.
Governor King described the ships as being "filthy beyond description. Some convicts were lying dead with heavy irons on, while many more died as they were coming to the hospital"
There has been an inquiry as to whether the masters had contravened their charters as convict carriers. The Governor noted that the Atlas was carrying liquor.

INFO ON JOHN CURTIS AND ANN MORAN COURTESY MARY WILSON

John Curtis was probably born in Daglingworth/Bristol England c 1750 and was married at St Phillips and Jacobs in Bristol to Jane Purrier in 1773. They had 10 children. John practiced accountancy until the early 1790’s .

In March 1795 he was tried and convicted at the Lent Assizes in Gloucester on 4 counts of “forging, counterfeiting, coining . . . silver coin of the realm called a sixpence”. He was sentenced to 7 years which was transmuted to transportation to Australia. He left England on the Ganges in August 1796 and arrived in Sydney on 2 June 1797.

In his first years in NSW he worked for the Government as a dairyman at Toongabbie. He was promoted to overseer and Superintendent of the Government herd in 1802.

John was emancipated on 4 June 1802 and the next year petitioned Governor King for permission to return to his family in England, unaware that his wife, Jane, had died from consumption in 1800. Despite his good reputation and that Governor Patterson, George Johnston and Rev. Marsden signed his plea he never returned to England.

In 1802, an Irish convict, Ann Moran arrived in NSW and was assigned to work for John. They eventually married in 1814 and had 5 children (not necessarily in that order).

In 1809 John was granted 80 acres of land at Liberty Plains (now Chester Hill), Sydney. Curtis Rd in Chester Hill runs across part of this land grant. By 1821 he owned a house in Parramatta, which he left to his oldest daughter, Betsy, 26 head of cattle and a mare, a 30 acre farm on Sydney Rd, near Haslem’s Creek (now Lidcombe), adjoining a grant of 100 acres made to Ann after John’s death. This land stayed in the family.

The Villawood Migrant Hostel in Millers Rd Villawood stands on John Curtis’s original estate.

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John Curtis Petition to Governor King in 1803

 

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This is from “Kings Papers” in Sydney Library. It was sent to me by Ken Eccleston about 15 (?) years ago. Looking at the handwriting it is very similar to my father’s handwriting (also a John) – he always had the reputation of having beautiful handwriting when he was young; may be it is inherited. Dad was also an accountant.


John Curtis Letter to Governor MacQuarie

 

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John died on 12 September 1821 and is buried at St John’s Pioneer Cemetery Parramatta.

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John Curtis Will:

 

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Ann Moran (c1767 – 1832)

Born c 1767 in Ireland. She was one of the first hundred Irish women convicts to come to Australia. She arrived on the “Hercules” in 1802 after being convicted in County Heath, Ireland.

After arrival she was assigned to work for John Curtis1 They eventually married on 6 August 1814 at St John’s Parramatta, NSW, and had 5 children, not necessarily in that order.

After John’s death in 1821 she applied for and was given a further land grant of 100 acres adjoining John’s original 30 acres in c1824.

Ann died ion 6 October 1832 and was buried at the site of Central Railway Station in Sydney. Later the original cemetery was moved to the Pioneer Cemetery at Botany.

HURRELLS

HURRELL SISTERS COURTESY OF MERILYN HURRELL AND HER NAN.

Hurrell Sisters

COMPARE THIS ONE WITH THE ONE IN MY FAMILY WITH GRANDMA SANDERS AKA LUCY JANE HURRELL. ( FRONT LEFT IN MERILYN’S PHOTO. SECOND FROM RIGHT IN MINE.)

 

GRANDMA AND THE AUNTS 001

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Hurrell Clan - Thomas Dennis and Isabella Kerr possible

HURRELL CLAN.

Twins photo WITH BLACKBERRY SANDERS

BLACKBERRY SANDERS AND ‘ THE TWINS’.

ONLINE BOOKSTORE

GUTENBERG PROJECT

Journal of a Voyage to New South Wales

with sixty-five plates of non descript animals, birds, lizards, serpents, curious cones of trees and other natural productions
by
John White Esquire, (1757/8-1832)
Surgeon-General to the [First Fleet and the] Settlement [at Port Jackson]

THE JOURNEY TOOK PLACE IN 1787 .

ANCESTORS ARRIVING APP SAME TIME

1791
MATILDA
THOMAS SANDERS

1797
GANGES
JOHN CURTIS

1801
HERCULES
ANN MORAN

1804
COROMANDEL
FRANCIS PRENDERGAST

______________________________________________________________

Botany Bay

True Tales of Early Australia
Lang, John (1816-1864 )

http://purl.library.usyd.edu.au/setis/id/p00025

_________________________________________________________________

Records of Legislative Proceedings from 1824

PARLIAMENT OF NSW

http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/web/common.nsf/key/pre1991Hansard

________________________________________________________________


A Project Gutenberg of Australia eBook Title: Letters from an Exile at Botany Bay (1794) Author: Thomas Watling (b. 1762)

http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks04/0400011.txt

Letters from an Exile at Botany Bay, to his Aunt in DumfriesGiving a Particular Account of the Settlement of New South Wales,with the Customs and Manners of the Inhabitants.Watling, Thomas (b.1762)First Published: 1794THE PUBLISHER OF THE ENSUING PRODUCTION,SENDS IT INTO THE WORLD FOR THE TWO FOLLOWING REASONS.First; he hopes it may contribute a little to the relief of an old,infirm, and friendless woman, to whom it is addressed.And Secondly; he imagines, the account here given of a country so littleknown, may be interesting to some, and amusing to all. With the original,which is now in his hands, he declines taking any liberty, but leaves theunfortunate exile to tell his story exactly in his own words, and how heacquits himself, the public must determine.

In the warmer season, the thunder very frequently rolls tremendous,accompanied by a scorching wind, so intolerable as almost to obstructrespiration;–whilst the surrounding horizon looks one entire sheet ofuninterrupted flame. The air, notwithstanding, is in general dry. Fifteenmonths have been known to elapse without a single shower; but though thusdry, the transitions of hot and cold are often surprisingly quick andcontrasted without any discernable injury to the human system. I havefelt one hour as intensely warm as if immediately under the line, whenthe next has made me shiver with cold, yet have I not experienced any harm therefrom; owing, without a doubt, to the dryness and salubrity, ofthe atmosphere.

_______________________________________

Hard life in the colonies, and other experiences by sea and land, now first printed. Comp. from private letters (1892)

 

http://www.archive.org/details/hardlifeincoloni00jenkiala

Jenkyns, Catherine Carolyn; Jenkins, Arthur Cardew; Jenkins, Gilbert Chilcott; Dunbar, Haln Killegrew

SITES TO SEE : NEW SOUTH WALES

NEW SOUTH WALES

THE ONLINE BOOKS PAGE.

EMIGRANTS FROM THE FAMILY :

YEAR
SHIP
NAME

1838
BRILLIANT
JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL

1839
JAMES MORAN
MCLEODS AND MACKAYS

1849
VICTORIA
WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS

1853
WILLIAM BROWN
JACKSONS

1853
BEEJAPORE
CRAIGS AND HURRELLS

FOR SOME BACKGROUND ATMOSPHERE OF THIS PERIOD , try this one from Google Books:

Notes and sketches of New South Wales: during a residence in that colony

A RESIDENCE IN THAT COLONY FROM 1839 TO 1844.

By Mrs. Charles Meredith

CONTENTS.

Preface \ -i

CHAPTER I.

Embarkation — Indisposition—Pleasures of a Sea Voyage—Fellow-pas-

sengers—Observance of Character—Devonshire Coast—Pilots—Land

Luxuries—H.M.S. Hercules—Eddystone Lighthouse—Last Land . 1

CHAPTER II.

Bay of Biscay—Spanish Coast—Employment the best preventive of.

Ennui—Phosphorescence of the Sea—Portuguese Men-of-war—Swal-

lows— Tenerifie — Speaking the Cherub — Fear of Pirates—Por-

poises—Flying Fish—Capture of a Boneto—Dolphins . 7

Chapter in.

Calm in the Tropics—Sharks — Turtle — lanthina—Shovel-board—

" Crossing the Line "—Loss of the North Star—Southern Constellations

—Moonlight in the Tropics—Sunsets—Waterspouts—"Sun-dogs" . ’16

CHAPTER IV.

Whales and " Jets d’eau"—Birds—Boatswain—Boobies—Cape Pigeon—

Mischief of Idleness—" Mr.Winkles" at Sea—Great Albatross—Nelly

—Stormy Petrel—Blue Petrel—Sailors’ Delicacies—Stormy Weather 23

CHAPTER V.

Island of St. Paul’s—Islands in Bass’s Straits—Mutton-birds—Botany

Bay Heads—General excitement—Heads of Port Jackson—Scenery—

New Zealanders—First sight of Sydney—Pull ashore—Comforts of

Land Life—George Street, Sydney—The Domain—Eucalyptus, &c.

—Wooloomooloo—Government Gardens 31
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VI.

Sydney Market—Fish, &c.—Dust, Flies, Mosquitoes—Drive to the

Lighthouse — Flowers — Parrots—Black Cockatoos—Hyde Park—

Churches — Libraries — " Currency " Population — Houses — Balls,

&c. —Inns—Colonial Newspapers Page 43

CHAPTER VII.

Leave Sydney—" Clearings"—Huts of the Working Classes — Chain-

Gangs — Parramatta — Creeks and Rivers —Inn — Birds — Road to

Penrith—Grasshoppers—Penrith—Nepean—Emu Plains—Ascent of

the Blue Mountains—Waratah 56

CHAPTER VIII.

A "Country Inn"—Breakfast—Contrasts—A Bush Ramble and Digres-

sion about Ants—Mountain Scenery—Cattle Skeletons—"Weather-

board" Inn—Supper and Night at " Bliud Paddy’s"—Mountains, and

the Surveyor’s Roads—Mount Victoria—Convict Gangs and Bush-

rangers—Inn at the " Rivulet," and its Inhabitants—The Ruling Vice 66

CHAPTER IX.

" Hassan’s Walls"—Grass Trees—Mount Lambey—Victoria Inn—Speci-

men of Benevolent Politeness—Colonial Bridges—First View of

Bathurst—The " Settlement"—Dearth—Climate—Hot Winds—Pro-

cessions of Whirlwinds—Hurricanes . . . . . .79

CHAPTER X.

».

Bathurst Society and Hospitality—" White Rock"—Native Dance and

Ceremony—Kangaroo Dance—Appearance of Natives—Children—

" Gins "—Their marriage, slavery, and sufferings—Family Dinner-

party—Adopted Children—Infanticide—Religion — " Devil-Devil"—

Language—Story of Hougong and Jimmy—" Ay, ay ?"—Duties of

the Toilet—Native Songs—Mimicry—Fondness for English Dress—

Boundary Laws—Legal Parricide—Habitual Treachery . .90

CHAPTER XI.

Native Huts—" Gunyon"—Natives’ ingenuity in Duck-Snaring and

Fishing—Native Weapons—Green Frogs—Freshwater Shells—Platy-

pus — Spur-winged Plover—Australian Harebell — Convolvulus —

Everlastings—Peppermint Tree—Opossums—Natives’ mode of taking

His
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XII. ,

Native Turkeys—Their mode of Incubation—Native Cranberry—Our

Return — Locusts — Manna — Transformations — Ground Grubs —

Night at the Rivulet—New flowers—Heat and Dust—" Weather-

board" Inn—Walk to the Cascade—Fringed Violet—Waratahs—

Fine View—Lories Page 114

CHAPTER XIII.

Storm and fine view on Lapstone Hill—Farm-house in the " public" line

—Arrive at Parramatta — Steamboat — Scenery on the " River "—

Sydney Christmas Tree—Christmas Day—Tippling Servants . 124

CHAPTER XIV.

Homebush—Colonial Country-houses—The " Avenue"—Gates—Slip-

rails — Bushrangers — Mounted Police — Dingoes — Flying Fox —

Flying Opossum—Native Cats—Birds—Robins—Swallows— Knife-

grinder—Coachman—Bell-bird—Laughing Jackass—Larks—Game 129

CHAPTER XV.

Norfolk Island Pine—English Pear-tree—Daisy — Bush Flowers—

Creepers—He-oak—Zamia—" Wooden Pear-tree"—Native Cherry—

Insect Architecture—Twig-nests, &c.—Butterflies—Ground Spiders—

Tarantula—Silk Spiders—Scorpions—Hornets—Mosquitoes—Ants . 139

CHAPTER XVI.

Guanas—Lizards—Snakes—Salt Marshes—Fishing—Crabs—Toad-fish

—Mangrove-trees—Romance and reality—Night sounds — Orange-

Groves—Gardens—Gigantic Lily—Scarcity of fresh water—Winter

Rains—Salt Well — Climate in Winter—Society — Conversation—

Servants—Domestic matters—Embarkation for Van Diemen’s Land 150

N.B. OUR EMIGRANTS WOULD NOT HAVE HAD THE SAME ADVANTAGES AS MRS MEREDITH .

ODD LINKS AND SITES TO SEE HERBERT BURDETT SANDERS ON AWM ROLL OF HONOUR.

AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL

10 bert grandpa maude & grandma

HERBERT BURDETT, MAUDE, GRANDMA LUCY JANE AND GRANDFATHER FREDERICK

http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/roll_of_honour/person.asp?p=504594

HERBERT BURDETT SANDERS

Herbert Burdett Sanders

Service number: 1074

Rank: Private [Pte]

Unit: 2nd Battalion (Infantry)

Service: Army

Conflict: 1914-1918

Date of death: 23 July 1916

Cemetery or memorial details: Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France

War Grave Register notes: SANDERS, Pte. Herbert Burdett, 1074. 2nd Bn. 23rd July, 1916. Age 19. Son of Lucy Jane Sanders, of Lu-Bert, Myra Rd., Dulwich Hill, New South Wales, and the late Frederick John Sanders. Born at Kinchela, New South Wales.

Source: AWM145 Roll of Honour cards, 1914-1918 War, Army

image

image

http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/roll_of_honour/person.asp?p=504594

THE STORY OF BERT’S LAST ACTION IN FRANCE.

HERBERT BURDETT SANDERS

image

THERE IS A GOOD DEAL MORE CORRESPONDENCE  in the PDF below. I had always thought he had died from illness but it seems not. One report says he was app 29 years old but he is on his mother’s form as being 19.

http://www.awm.gov.au/cms_images/1DRL428/00031/1DRL428-00031-2410905.pdf

___________________________________________________________________________

GRANDFATHER SANDERS, JOHN GEORGE.

EMBARKATION ON EURIPIDES http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/nominal_rolls/first_world_war_embarkation/person.asp?p=35376

____________________________________________________________________________

FATHER BRUCE SANDERS

http://cas.awm.gov.au/privaterecord/PR01895

ID Number:
PR01895

Title:
Sanders, Bruce (Warrant Officer Class 2) 1920-

Maker:
Sanders, Bruce

Object type:
Papers

Place made:
Australia

Date made:
1931-2001

Measurements:
2 boxes: x 28 cm + 2 folio

Summary:
Personal papers of Warrant Officer Class 2 Bruce Sanders, including: school, employment and Army service records; personal diary covering war service and post-war life; membership records of 2/3 Pioneer Battalion Association, kept during term of office as Assistant Secretary.

Copyright:
External copyright

Copying provisions:
Makers papers – copying permitted

Access:
Open

Related subject:
Correspondence; Diaries; Documentation; Rolls

Related unit:
2/3 Pioneer Battalion

Related conflict:
Second World War, 1939-1945

SITES TO SEE : THE TIME OF ANN MORAN AND THE HERCULES.

http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1802.htm

http://www.convictconnections.org.au/shipsA-I.html

http://www.danbyrnes.com.au/blackheath/ships3.htm

http://www.historyservices.com.au/nsw_colonial_chronology_1770_1803.htm

http://www.jstor.org/pss/27516597

http://www.mcginleyclan.org/irishslaves.htm

 

EXTRACT FROM http://www.ulladulla.info/historian/1804deaths.html

Deaths 1804 NSW & Norfolk Island Early Colonial History Research and Indexed by Historian Cathy Dunn. 

Castle Hill

HUGHES

James

1804

SG 19 Jan 1806. Last week a native informed Tarlington, a settler, that the skeleton of a white man, with a musket and tin kettle laying beside him, had been seen under the first ridge of the mountains. The settler accompanied the native, and found the skeleton, and as described, the bones of which being very long, leads to a more than probable conjecture, that the remains are those of James Hughes, who absconded from Castle Hill the 15th of February 1804, in company with 15 others, most of whom had recently arrived in the Hercules, on the ridiculous pretext of finding a road to China, but in reality to commit the most unheard of depredations; the consequences of which were, that the whole except Hughes were shortly apprehended, and 13 capitally convicted before the Criminal Court, of whom two were executed, and 11 pardoned. Hughes was an able active man, well known in Ireland during the rebellion that existed in that country for his abominable depravities; and it is hoped his miserable end will warn the thoughtless, inexperienced and depraved against an inclination to exchange the comfort and security derived from honest labour, to depart from which can only lead to the most fatal consequences

Parramatta

HUMES

Samuel

Mar 1804

Leader in the 1804 Battle of Vinegar Hill – rebellion executed at Parramatta and hung in chains, Convict Hercules I 1802

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Revolution, counter-revolution, and union

By Jim Smyth

NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIA NEWSPAPERS – RANDOM SANDERS’ AND MURDERS

With nothing in particular to do this morning, I am listing entries found when I entered SANDERS and MURDER in the search tab.

There is no indication at all that these have any connection at all with OUR Sanders Name.

    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954) Tuesday 4 February 1862. Which is about the time that Peter Mark Ready was down on the same goldfields with his young family.

THE SANDERS AND JOHNSON GANG OF BUSHRANGERS.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5709445

 

SUFFRAGETTES

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5804820

 

 

Northern Territory Times and Gazette (Darwin, NT : 1873-1927) Saturday 9 February 1884

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3155297 This one wasn’t murder . It was an accident.