SARAH ANN READY ( BENSON) & GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

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0 2 sarah & george moore 19th C

SARAH ANN READY (BENSON)

1830-1910

GEORGE MOORE Jnr

1828 -1903

PHIL of READY OR NOT has now sent me an email in response to my request to use his research online. PERMISSION GRANTED said Phil only recently back in Action  after a nasty accident. It was years of work and travel and research that provided the information on the READY line for this generation. PERMISSION GRANTED.  A very gracious response indeed. Phil is currently at work on his Index and updates on READY OR NOT.

from ready or not ; following the death of Peter Mark Ready on the Goldfields of Victoria. Following on from

PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON ON THE GOLDFIELDS

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/07/27/peter-mark-ready-and-sarah-ann-benson-on-the-goldfields/

SARAH ANN (BENSON) READY and GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

Faced with the problem of survival, and with 5 young children to feed, on the 30th October 1863, Peter Mark Ready’s widow, SARAH READY, took the only acceptable course open to her. At the age of 31, 16 months after her husband’s death, she married 35 year old GEORGE MOORE, born in 1828 in SYDNEY to GEORGE MOORE Snr and ANN TRACEY. ( Vol 63 no 897 RGI )

GEORGE MOORE’s relationship to the family before the tragedy is not known but he seems to have been a close friend. Soon after the death of PETER MARK READY, he brought the family back to NSW for it would have been an unhappy reminder to all if they had remained. The fact that George had paid for the funeral and married Sarah the following year, taking on 5 children at the same time says something of his regard for them.

 

GEORGE SENIOR AND ANN TRACEY. George Jnr’s father, GEORGE MOORE Snr, was a 19 year old carpenter who had been living at Newcastle, England , when he was sentenced at his trial on 24 October 1821 to a life sentence and transportation to NSW. Arriving aboard the ASIA II on 24 July 1822, he was assigned to work for SOLOMON LEVY in SYDNEY and in 1826 received permission from the Governor to marry. His marriage to ANN TRACEY who had come free to the Colony, took place on 5 February 1827 and over the next 24 years they had a family of three sons. GEORGE 1828. HENRY 1832  WILLIAM 1842.and a daughter MARY in 1851. George had received a conditional pardon from the Governor in 1837 and lived until 17 April 1883.

 

GEORGE MOORE Jnr and SARAH settled down in SYDNEY and three years later a son WILLIAM THOMAS MOORE was born, the first of their three children. A daughter ESMA was born in 1870 and the last of their children HENRY THOMAS MOORE was born in 1874.

Seeing an opening, GEORGE MOORE Jnr set up as a PRODUCE MERCHANT at 165 Sussex Street Sydney with the family residence at 92 GLEBE STREET, GLEBE. it was here in this area that the children went to school and grew to maturity until on the 4th April 1874, Sarah Ann Ready married WILLIAM HENRY WATSON, a blacksmith from NEW ZEALAND. Four years later, in 1878, her sister ELIZABETH HANNAH READY, married JOHN SMITH and on the 10 June 1879, three months before the establishment of the first steam trams in Sydney, the last of PETER MARK READY’S daughters CATHERINE LOUISA was married to JOSEPH HOWE.

1897 saw the marriage of HENRY MOORE their younger half brother to ELLEN MCPHEE, setting up home across the road from his parents at No 75 GLEBE ROAD GLEBE. Esma Moore appears not to have married.

At the time GEORGE MOORE died , Sarah and he were living in no 94 Glebe Road Glebe, the house next door to their original home. it was here that Sarah died on 17 October 1910. Their graves are in the Church of England Section of Rookwood Cemetery along with the body of one of Sarah’s grandchildren FREDERICK BENSON READY.

There is some evidence that SARAH and PETER MARK READY may have quarrelled on the night so long before when he was killed, for a saying has come down through their daughter Sarah Ann Watson’s branch of the family ;

“ NEVER SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR HUSBAND IN ANGER FOR HE MAY FALL DOWN A MINE.”

SARAH ANN(BENSON) READY m 30/10/1883 GEORGE MOORE JNR
WILLIAM THOMAS
1865-1872
ESMA
1868
HENRY THOMAS
1874-19??
M ELLEN MCPHEE

 

 

 

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FROM MARILYN;  George Moore married Sarah Ann Ready in Sydney not Victoria, have a marriage transcript and it says Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth St, Sydney, witnesses Henry Samuels (step father) and Jane Samuels!!  Hadn’t noticed before but this must be a half sister, but is she ‘Jane’ or ‘Hannah’.

Their 3rd child, Henry Thomas Moore who married Ellen McPhee, then their 2nd child Leslie Francis Moore who married Gladys May Robinson, then their 1st child Gladys Ivy Moore who married , Allen William Roberts

TRIAL OF GEORGE MOORE SENIOR

GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS, GEORGE MOORE, Theft > pocketpicking, 24th October 1821.

Reference Number: t18211024-151
Offence: Theft ; pocketpicking
Verdict: Guilty; Guilty
Punishment: Transportation

FROM TRIALS OF THE OLD BAILEY ONLINE http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18211024-151-defend1366&div=t18211024-151#highlight

1324. GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS and GEORGE MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of James Larbalesher , from his person .

JAMES LARBALESHER . On Monday last, between twelve and one o’clock at night, I was at the corner of Hatton-garden , coming home with my wife, several people passed near me, I felt and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner Lewis give it to a woman. I took him and the woman. Moore came up and said, "What have you to do with this woman, she has nothing of yours." I called the watch and took Moore too as an accomplice; he endeavoured to escape, but I pursued and took him. I do not know what became of the woman. I am sure I saw it in Lewis’s hand.

BENJAMIN RUSHBROOK . I was parting from a few friends at the corner of Hatton-garden. I heard a bustle, and saw Moore lay hold of the prosecutor, and say "What have you to do with this woman, she has no handkerchief of yours." The prosecutor took him, the woman escaped with the handkerchief.

THOMAS BARTLET . The prisoners were given in my charge.

LEWIS’S Defence. I was out of employ and was distressed, my parents having a large family I did not like to live on them, which caused me to keep late hours. I humbly implore mercy.

MORRIS’S Defence. I got intoxicated and shoved one of these gentlemen, but what else I did I cannot say. I was in the woman’s company.

LEWIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

MORRIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

New Edition of the 1831 Census

FROM STAFFORSHIRE UNIVERSITY

New Edition of the 1831 Census

The Victorian Census Project has now digitised the entire 1831 census for the whole of Great Britain and its offshore islands of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. A copy of the full census in machine-readable form will be available from the Data Archive, at the University of Essex, in early 2005. By clicking on the appropriate links below a new version of the 1831 census, reworked according to registration district in England and Wales, and hundred in Scotland, can be downloaded.

http://www.staffs.ac.uk/schools/humanities_and_soc_sciences/census/vichome.htm

BACK ON THE BEEJAPORE 1853

FROM TWAS HARD TO DIE FRAE HAME

‘IT WAS HARD TO
DIE FRAE HAME’:
DEATH, GRIEF AND MOURNING AMONG SCOTTISH MIGRANTS TO NEW ZEALAND,
1840 -1890.

 

By
Debra Powell
A Thesis
Submitted to the University of Waikato
in fulfilment of the
requirements for the degree of
Master of Arts
in History
2007

Infectious diseases, chronic illness, accidents at sea, dysentery and diarrhoea, and the debilitating effects of constant seasickness on pregnant women and breast-feeding mothers, all took a toll on passenger numbers. Migrants were not unaware of the risks involved. The loss of babies and infants was considered an inevitable consequence of long seaboard journeys. William Usherwood on board the Beejapore to Sydney in 1853 expressed a common sentiment when he wrote: ‘The … adults are all in good health, we have lost several children but this was quite expected, being always the case’.

EMIGRATION 1848

Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, May 2, 1850

 

 

1848 EMIGRATION Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, May 2, 1850 ass emig The Bristol Mercury (Bristol, England), Saturday, June 24, 1854; Issue 3353.

 

 

EMIGRANTS FROM THE FAMILY :

YEAR SHIP NAME
1838 BRILLIANT JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL
1839 JAMES MORAN MCLEODS AND MACKAYS
1849 VICTORIA WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS
1853 WILLIAM BROWN JACKSONS
1853 BEEJAPORE CRAIGS AND HURRELLS