GALLOWGATE GLASGOW IN THE 1830s

vkgc_misc100

HOMETOWN OF JAMES BELL. TRIED THERE FOR HOUSEBREAKING IN 1830 AND TRANSPORTED ON THE YORK ARRIVING IN NSW IN FEB 1831.

GLASGOW MAILS Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, March 19, 1832; Issue 17262.

CALEDONIAN MERCURY MONDAY MARCH 19 1832

GALLOWGATE2he Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, September 10, 1831; Issue 8172.

NEWCASTLE COURANT SATURDAY SEP 10 1831

YORK SAILS2 Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, October 4, 1830; Issue 1617.

HAMPSHIRE TELEGRAPH AND SUSSEX CHRONICLE MONDAY OCT 4 1830

___________________________________________________________________

THE YORK 1831

(NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH THE HULK YORK IN ENGLAND)

Convict Ship arrivals – 1831http://www.historyaustralia.org.au/twconvic/tiki-print.php?page=1831

 

SHIP           MASTER        SURGEON               DEPARTED   ARRIVED    MALE CONVICTS FEMALE CONVICTS

York 1831  Leary, Dan.  France, Campbell  Sheerness     Sydney       200                      0

 

(http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/shipNSW2.html
Vessel              Arrived    Port    Sailed      From     Days   Embarked   Sydney    Hobart  Norfolk I    Master               Surgeon
                                                                               M    F    M    F    M    F    M    F
York I (2)         07 02 1831  NSW   04 09 1830  Sheerness   156   200        198                          Dan Leary              Campbell France

 

York I (2) transported only 8 male Irish convicts http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/ships.htm

 

Feb. 8.-YORK (ship), 478 tons, Leary master, from London, Campbell & Co. agents; 198 male prisoners and government stores.)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199042

 

CONVICTS ON BOARD:

CARLISLE James York 1831

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198935

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 8 February 1831, page 2.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1931.

Monday Evening.

The York has brought English news to the last week in September. We have now before us London papers to the 27th of that month, and the first intelligence we have to announce is of a most painful nature, being the sudden DEATH OF MR. HUSKISSON

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198936

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 8 February 1831, page 2. News

Shipping Intelligence

ARRIVALS.

From New Zealand, on Sunday last, the schooner Currency Lass, with 80 tons flax.

From Newcastle, same day, the cutter Fairy.

From London, yesterday, whence she sailed the 4th of September, and from Portsmouth the 29th, the ship York (429 tons), Captain Leary, with 200 male prisoners, 2 having died on the passage. Surgeon Superintendent, Campbell France, Esq. The guard consists of 40 non-commissioned officers and privates of the 17th Regiment, who are accompanied by 4 women and 2 children. Passengers, Colonel Despard, 17th Regt., Mrs. Despard and 3 children, Ensign Owen, and Ann Forster and C. Donohoe, servants to Mrs. Despard.

REMAINING IN THE HARBOUR.

SHIPS.- Louisa, Forth, Nancy, Royal Admiral, Clarkstone, Sir George Murray, Dryade, Denmark Hill, Mary Ann, Andromeda, Burrell, Janet hat, Vittoria, Elizabeth, Albion, Resource, and York.

BRIGs.-Elizabeth, Wellington, Norval, Couvier Thistle, Governor Phillip, and Lord Rodney.

SCHOONERS- Henry, Resolution, Admiral Gifford, Schnapper, Darling, New Zealander, and Currency Lass.

CUTTERS-Emma, Fairy, and Letitia Bingham.
Total.-Ships, 17 ; Brigs, 7 ; Schooners, 7 ;  Cutter, 3 ; in all, 34.

 

NEWS OF THE YORK 1831

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198965 The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 10 February 1831, page 2.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198968

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 10 February 1831, page 2.

We are requested to correct a mistake which occurred in the notice of the arrival of the ship York (Captain Leary) in our last number. The burthen of the York is there stated to be 429 tons, instead of 478 tons, as appears by the register, -which we bave seen. This vessel is not the old York, as some persons, we are informed, suppose.; but was built, in the year 1819, at Southwick, in Durham. Captain Leary, the commander, is an old and much respected visitant to this colony.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199140

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 19 February 1831, page 2.

The male prisoners by the York were landed yesterday morning. Among them are a considerable number of strong healthy labourers accustomed to agriculture, who will doubtless prove no small acquisition to the settlers who may obtain them. There are also several good mechanics and tradesmen.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199405

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 5 March 1831, page 2

The second division of the 57th regiment, will embark on board the York, for Madras, next Thursday.

The following is the ‘ Return ‘ of a detachment of the 57th Regiment, to embark

on board the ship York, on Saturday next,

for Madras :

Major R. Hunt, Captain J. Brown, lady,
and family ; Lieut. G. Edwards, Lieut. R.
Alexander, Lieut. E. Lockyer, Paymaster
G. H. Green, lady, and family ; 9 Serjeants,
J 2 drummers, 7 corporals, 132′ privates,

15 women, and 39 children.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199723

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 24 March 1831, page 2.

Attempt at Robbery.-A seaman
belonging to the ship York, having just come ashore
on Saturday evening with ten dollars in his pocket,
was stopped by two fellows opposite the Dock-yard,
who knocked him down, ond then commenced ful-
filling their intentions on his pockets. Jack how-

ever was not disposed to strike, although boarded on
both sides, and defended himself manfully, till Dowd,
with some other constables, came to his assistance,
on whose approach the villains decamped with all
possible expedition, leaving the tar in possession of
all his shot, and cursing them for a couple of lub

belly rascals.

 

YORK 2 article2199895-3-001

DON’T MISS THIS STORY READ ON : http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199895  The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 5 April 1831, page 2.

AND THEN THE POSTCRIPT;

[ POSTSCRIPT, 9 o’CIock, P. M.

_____________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199991

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 9 April 1831, page 2. News

RETURN OF THE YORK,

We have to announce the gratifying
news of the safe return to port of the ship
York, together with the equally pleasing
intelligence that the apprehensions for

the safety of the crew, which a chain of
circumstances occasioned in the public
mind, turn out to be altogether ground
less. She anchored yesterday evening
about dusk, in Watson’s Bay, the passen
gers and crew all well. From the hasty
particulars which we have been enabled
to glean, it appears that her parting from
the Edward was occasioned by a strong
northerly wind, which induced Captain
Leary to alter his course, and endeavour
to make the passage through Bass’ Straits
When the ship was hailed by Captain
Gilbert, from the Edward, the wind was
so high, that nothing more than a con.
fused sound could be distinguished on

board, and, being unable to lay-to, she
proceeded on her course : the wind
subsequently veered to the southward
and, after beating about the straits for
several days, Captain Leary thought it
most advisable to return to Sydney. We
are most happy at being thus enabled
satisfactorily to allay the ferment which
a rumour so astounding in all the alleged
circumstances which gave rise to it, was
calculated to excite, not only in this Co.
lony, but in every part of the British
dominions to which it might reach.

 

FURTHER TO THE POSTCRIPT

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200039

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 12 April 1831, page 2.

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, LAST.

RETURN OF THE YORK.

We had the heartfelt satisfaction of
announcing in our last, in a hasty Post-
script, the safe return to port of the ship
York, which was supposed, from Captain
Gilbert’s strange story, to have been
piratically seized by the troops she was

conveying to Madras. We must now
give some explanation on the other side,
as derived from the very best authority.

On Sunday, the 27th ult., Captain
Leary, of the York, dined with Captain
Gilbert on board the Edward, and re-
turned to his own ship in the evening,
after arranging for the signals to be made
during that night. This was the last per-
sonal intercourse they had. The wind

was then N. E.

On Monday, the 28th, no communica-
tions took place, “and the wind continued
steady from the N. E.

On Tuesday, the 29th (the memorable
day on which Captain Gilbert supposed
the York to be captured), about 3 o’clock
in the afternoon, Captain Leary, find-
ing the wind so unchangeably contrary,
began to think seriously of putting

ONCE AGAIN. READ ON THIS IS A GRAND STORY.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200039

 

AND THEN THE YORK RETURNS TO SYDNEY AGAIN

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200161

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 19 April 1831, page 2

RETURN OF THE YORK AGAIN!

OUR good friend the York, has visited
us yet once again, having this time en-
countered dangers of no imaginary or
trifling order. She put back on Sunday,
with her rigging a good deal damaged.
The tremendous hurricane of Saturday

night and Sunday morning, was enough
to have foundered the stoutest ship that
ever floated, and when we remember that
it was from the south-east, and how near
the York was to an iron-bound lee-shore,
we may judge how imminent was her
danger, and how providential her escape.
But of this our readers will form a more
adequate conception by the subjoined
extract of a letter from one of the pas-
sengers, written to his friend in Sydney,
immediately after anchoring in Watson’s
Bay.

” You must be a little surprised to “find us
here again : the fears entertained for our
safety on the former occasion were more
sensibly felt by ourselves on this. We
sailed yesterday morning, with a fine wind
from the S.W., the weather looking very
dark and unsettled. About ten o’clock it
changed all round the compass, and at last
settled in the South-East, and increased to
a gale, accompanied with the most awful
thunder, lightning, and the heaviest rain I
ever witnessed, which continued the whole
of the day, and the sea ran to an immense
height. Our fore-top-sail-yard was carried
away-I rather think struck by lightning
the top-sail and two or three other sails

blown to ribbands : two of our boats stove
in. About two o’clock in the morning Cap-
tain Leary came to me, and said it was
necessary to have an additional number of
hands on deck-not that there was any im-
minent danger, but that we were on a lee
shove, and the ship having lost her head
sails, consequently was not easily worked
off. Every assistance was of course af-
forded ; and I am happy to have it in my
power to state to you that no men could

behave better, notwithstanding they had
not a dry shirt to their backs for 24 hour.
As far as my own opinion goes, I feel con-
vinced that his own crew would never have
been able to save the ship from going on
shore, as we were close to the land to the
southward of the Light-house, and the sea
running mountains high. However, thank
divine Providence, we got in as soon as day-
light would permit him to approach the
entrance to the Heads. I am happy to state
how grateful we all feel for Captain Leary’s
zeal and exertions; he never quitted the
deck the whole time; and but for his
thorough knowledge and experience as a
seaman, I really believe we should not have
survived to tell the tale. Our miseries did
not end here ; we bumped two or three
times on the bank at the Sow-and-Pigs.
I hope the ship has not suffered any mate-
rial injury, but it will be as well to have that
ascertained before we make another trial.”

We once more congratulate these brave
troops on their safety, hoping that after
all these untoward events, they will en-
joy a quick and pleasant passage to the
place of destination.

 

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 26 April 1831, page 3 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200267 The York is immediately to be hove down, in order to her undergoing a thorough repair, previously to proceeding to sea once more. She cannot, therefore, leave this spot before the expiration of a month at least. The troops disembarked yesterday morning, and marched hack to their old quarters, looking like any thing but pirates, poor fellows !

 

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 28 April 1831, page 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200302 The detachment of the 57th Regiment, which disembarked from the York on Monday, proceeded to Parramatta, and not to their old quarters,” as we erroneously stated on Tuesday. ‘

 

AND TO FINISH IT OFF FOR THE YORK IN 1831, THE EDITOR OF THE GAZEETE PERHAPS COULD HAVE BEEN A LITTLRE MORE COMPASSIONATE TO THE POET ON THE YORK.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200162

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 19 April 1831, page 2.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

We thank H. H. for his ‘Dream’, which will be

published in a day or two.

The lines written on board the York are not well measured.

J’s ‘ Lines written during the Thunder-storm on

Saturday last, will probably appear in our next.

____________________________________________________________________

SITES TO SEE RE THE YORK:

http://www.jenwilletts.com/Convict%20Ships.htm CONVICT SHIPS JEN WILLETTS

 

Convicts http://www.coraweb.com.au/convict.htm

 

Prison Hulk Records usually giving the names of convicts http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-PT-JACKSON-CONVICTS/2008-07/1215427845

 

CONVICTS TO AUSTRALIA http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/stories.html

 

Ballarat & District Genealogical Society –
Advice for Locating Convict Information  http://www.ballaratgenealogy.org.au/convicts.htm

 

http://www.geocities.com/pennytrueman/chstrans.html 

Joseph IKIN, 35, b. CHS, M, Ploughs, Reaps, Milks, Sows; T: 1831 from Sheerness to Sydney NSW, Ship: York.

John TAYLOR, 23, b. CHS, S, Wheelwright, T: 1831 from Sheerness to Sydney NSW, Ship: York.

 

EVENTS OF 1831 http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1831.htm

 

 

The People’s Health

By Milton James Lewis

 

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RANDOM SITES

RE SANDERS:

The Last Farewell

Devon Convicts Transported to Australia 1782 – 1821

 http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/DevonIndexes/LastFarewell.html

 

DEVON

http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/index.html

“A county of England, reaching from the Bristol to the English Channel, and bounded by Cornwall, and Somersetshire, and Dorsetshire. It is 69 miles in length, and 60 in breadth, and is divided into 31 hundreds. It is very hilly, and abounds in huge granite rocks, some of whose peaks are above 1500 feet in height. The highland is covered with wide moors, of which Dartmoor is the most extensive. But in the valleys and lower ground the soil is fertile. Its rivers are the Exe, the Culm, the Dart, the Tamar, the Otter, &c. Some parts of its coasts are composed of lofty cliffs, but at others there is a beautiful sandy shore. The air and climate are so mild and salubrious that invalids often retire to its sea-ports for the winter. Limestone, granite, some building-stone, and a species of wood-coal are found here, as well as some kinds of variegated marble. It produces corn, &c. and fruit trees, especially apples, whence much cider is made. Its fisheries also are of value. Exeter is its chief city. Population, 533, 460. It sends 22 members to parliament.” (From Barclay’s Complete and Universal English Dictionary, 1842.)

HISTORICAL TIMELINE

Compiled by Anne Mavric  http://home.vicnet.net.au/~pioneers/pppg10.htm

GALLOWGATE GLASGOW

WILHELLMINA MCLEOD MARRIES JAMES BELL – FROM GALLOWGATE

 

Glasgow (East Central)  http://gdl.cdlr.strath.ac.uk/airgli/airgli0104.htm

THE GALLOWGATE. – This street is one of the oldest thoroughfares of Glasgow. Its past history is fascinating, but I shall not pause to dwell thereon. Before the opening of London Street it was one of the chief highways out or into the city. Its leading shops were occupied by prominent citizens who did considerable business, especially among those who came in from the surrounding country districts. In my boyhood its vehicular traffic was considered great and important, and the guard’s bugle notes echoed through it as the mail coach entered the city, especially when bringing tidings of national importance.

 

SUTHERLAND SHIRE SCOTLAND

1808_20Robert_20Laurie_20and_20James_20Whittle-L

The James Moran, a ship of 600 tons, sailed under Captain Ferguson and Dr McNee. It left Loch Inver and Loch Broom, on 21st October, 1838,

Most of the 229 passengers on board were clearance victims. They came to Australia under Rev John Dunmore Lang’s Bounty Scheme. 2 people died on the voyage to Australia. The voyage took 113 days, sailing directly to Cape Town, where it arrived 26th December, 1838. 20 passengers left the ship there on New Year’s Day.

WILHELMINA MCLEOD emigrated from Sutherland Shire Scotland, with her mother JANET MACKAY , two sisters and a brother on the JAMES MORAN arriving Sydney 11-2-1839. The family moved to the Hunter.

James and  Wilhelmina married on 29-9-1840  at the Scots Church Paterson.

  • THE SHIP’S LIST

          http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/au1838.htm


Name of Ship             James Moran
Place of Departure    Loch Broom
Date of Sailing           13 Oct 1838
Destination                SYDNEY
Tonnage                     538

No. of Adult Passengers                                 136
No. of  Children between 14 and 7 Years      34
No. of  Children under 7 Years                      40
Total Number of Passengers                          210

 

_________________________________________________________________________

THE SUTHERLAND SHIRE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

             

             

            • http://www.cranntara.org.uk/clear5.htm 
            • EMIGRANTS & EMIGRATION   www.cranntara.org.uk

              The clearances had a lot of sub factors which were responsible for the mass waves of emigration. The collapse of the kelp industry,extreme poverty, the potato famine all made a new life abroad seem desirable. Promised by landowners that emigration would give them a new beginning and afar better way of living, for many it was not until they reached foreign shores that they realised that it was in fact hardship and poverty they faced

              ‘S i seo an dùthaich ‘s a bheil an cruadal
              Gun fhios do’n t-sluagh a tha tigh’nn anall.
              Gur h-olc a fhuaras oirnn luchd a’ bhuairidh
              A rinn le’n tuairisgeul ar toirt ann’.

             

            From 1815 to 1838 Nova Scotia received approximately 22,000 Scottish immigrants, most of them were from the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

            Between 1826-1827, approximately 2,000 Scots left from Tobermory and Stornaway, Scotland for Cape Breton Island.

            1835 saw approximately 3,500 departed from Stornaway, Oban and Campbelton. Others came from places in the Highlands and Islands such as Strath Glas, Moidart, Knoydart, Lochaber, the Inner Hebrides, Lewis and Harris, Barra, the Uists, Sutherlandshire and Wester Ross.

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

               

            AHA ! MCLEODS AND MACKAYS ON THE JAMES MORAN

            JAMES BELL ,28, from Gallowsgate , Glasgow , Scotland transported for housebreaking. Tried in Glasgow. 7 years. Arrived on the YORK on 7-2-1831. Assigned to Paterson River. Certificate of freedom – 9.8.1838

            WILHELMINA MCLEOD emigrated from Sutherland Shire Scotland, with her mother JANET MACKAY , two sisters and a brother on the JAMES MORAN arriving Sydney 11-2-1839. The family moved to the Hunter.

            James and  Wilhelmina married on 29-9-1840  at the Scots Church Paterson.

            THERE WE ARE ! What a difference one letter makes. Forget the WAVERLEY except for general interest. The ship we are looking for is the JAMES MORAN which arrived in SYDNEY in FEBRUARY 1839.

            banner_28638_lg

            THE MACKAY FAMILY STORY

             

            The James Moran, a ship of 600 tons, sailed under Captain Ferguson and Dr McNee. It left Loch Inver and Loch Broom, on 21st October, 1838, and arrived at Port Jackson on the 11th February 1839. When it arrived, 210 passengers disembarked, including infants born on the voyage
            Most of the 229 passengers on board were clearance victims. They came to Australia under Rev John Dunmore Lang’s Bounty Scheme. 2 people died on the voyage to Australia. The voyage took 113 days, sailing directly to Cape Town, where it arrived 26th December, 1838. 20 passengers left the ship there on New Year’s Day. The Jamnes Moran was apparently lost in the ice of the North Atlantice ca. 1857.
            NOTE: “clearance victims”. For those interested – there is an excellent book called “The Highland Clearances” By John Prebbles.  One should be able to get it via a library.

                 James Moran Passengers 

            Most of the 229 passengers on board were clearance victims. They came to Australia under Rev John Dunmore Lang’s Bounty Scheme. 2 people died on the voyage to Australia. The voyage took 113 days, sailing directly to Cape Town, where it arrived 26th December, 1838. 20 passengers left the ship there on New Year’s Day.

                  2 of the 18 single female passengers on the “James Moran”

            Surname
            Christian Name
            Native Place
            Calling
            Age
            Religion
            By whom engaged
            Wages
            Per day, week or year
            Whether with or without rations

            Name
            Address
            Pounds
            Shillings
            Pence

            McLeod
            Whilimima
            Sutherlandshire
            Servant
            16
            Presbyterian
            Mr David McKenzie
            15


            Year
            With

            McKay
            Janet
            Sutherlandshire
            Servant
            41?
            Presbyterian
            Not stated

             

             

            http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2548299

            The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 12 February 1839, page 3. News

            By the James Moran we receive the
            following information. The British
            King, with emigrants for this Port, was

            to leave Lochenvar on the 1st November.

            The Christina and Potentate were laid
            on at Greenock, with merchandise for
            this Colony ; also the Meta, Walker, via
            the Mauritius. The Asia, with emigrants,
            left Simons’ Bay, for this Port, two days
            previous to the James Moran. The
            James Moran spoke the Medusa in Bass’
            Straits on the 9lh instant, bound to Java,
            10 days from Sydney.

            • Articles were published in the Grafton “Daily Examiner” by G. Dennes dealing with Clarence River families who had come out 100 years earlier from Scotland on the “William Nicol, Midlothian, Brilliant, St George, Boyne, James Moran and Lady MacNaughton” The original bound copies of the :Daily Examiner” are held at the Clarence River Historical Society in Grafton.Some early copies are in microfiche. Enquire at your nearest library with a F.H.Section.  http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nswbelli/transcripts/publications.html

             

            Ship, Scottish Port of Origin and Date of Arrival in NSW
            ‘John Barry’ from Dundee 13/07/1837 ‘Hero’ from Leith 26/9/1839
            ‘William Nicol’ from Isle of Skye 27/10/1837 ‘Ariadne’ from Greenock 29/9/1839
            ‘Portland’ from Greenock 3/12/1837 ‘Glenswilly’ from Greenock 28/10/1839
            ‘Midlothian’ from Isle of Skye 12/12/1837 ‘Palmyra’ from Greenock 15/12/1839
            ‘Minerva’ from Greenock 23/01/1838 ‘Superb’ from Greenock 16/1/1840
            ‘Brilliant’ from Isle of Mull 24/01/1838 ‘Charlotte’ from Leith 19/1/1840
            ‘Duncan’ from Greenock 30/06/1838 ‘George Fyffe’ from Tobermory 25/1/1840
            ‘Lady Kennaway’ from Leith 12/08/1838 ‘Portland’ from Greenock 7/2/1840
            ‘William Rodger’ from Greenock 26/09/1838 ‘Henry Porcher’ from Isle of Skye 21/2/1840
            ‘Saint George’ from Oban, Scotland 15/11/1838 ‘Isabella Watson’ from Leith 20/9/1840
            ‘Portland’ from Greenock 22/12/1838 ‘Perfect’ from Greenock 26/12/1840
            ‘Boyne’ from Cromarty 2/01/1839 ‘Herald’ from Greenock 15/7/1841
            ‘Catherine Jamieson’ from Leith 19/01/1839 ‘Percy’ from Greenock 28/8/1841
            ‘Lady McNaughton’ from Cromarty 28/01/1839 ‘James Moran’ from Greenock 6/10/1841
            ‘James Moran’ from Loch Inver 11/2/1839 ‘New York Packet’ from Greenock 23/10/1841
            ‘British King’ from Tobermory 28/2/1839 ‘Trinidad’ from Greenock 6/11/1841
            ‘Asia’ from Cromarty 10/5/1839

            ARCHIBALD REYNOLDS http://www.monaropioneers.com/reynolds-a.htm

            Archibald married Flora Fraser, daughter of William Thomas Fraser and Catherine McGregor, September 21, 1840 in Jerrabomberra, NSW.3 Flora was born in 1815 in Lochbroom, Rosshire, Scotland, was baptised April 12, 1816 in Lochbroom, Rosshire, Scotland, died September 18, 1911 in “Kyloe” Adaminaby, NSW 4 at age 96, and was buried in Adaminaby Old Cemetery, Adaminaby, NSW.

            More about Flora :

            • Arrived: per ship ‘James Moran’, assisted immigrant, February 11, 1839, Sydney, NSW.

             

                      the story of William Munro & Ann MacKay who came to Australia on the James Moran in 1839.