SARAH ANN READY ( BENSON) & GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

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0 2 sarah & george moore 19th C

SARAH ANN READY (BENSON)

1830-1910

GEORGE MOORE Jnr

1828 -1903

PHIL of READY OR NOT has now sent me an email in response to my request to use his research online. PERMISSION GRANTED said Phil only recently back in Action  after a nasty accident. It was years of work and travel and research that provided the information on the READY line for this generation. PERMISSION GRANTED.  A very gracious response indeed. Phil is currently at work on his Index and updates on READY OR NOT.

from ready or not ; following the death of Peter Mark Ready on the Goldfields of Victoria. Following on from

PETER MARK READY AND SARAH ANN BENSON ON THE GOLDFIELDS

https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/07/27/peter-mark-ready-and-sarah-ann-benson-on-the-goldfields/

SARAH ANN (BENSON) READY and GEORGE MOORE Jnr.

Faced with the problem of survival, and with 5 young children to feed, on the 30th October 1863, Peter Mark Ready’s widow, SARAH READY, took the only acceptable course open to her. At the age of 31, 16 months after her husband’s death, she married 35 year old GEORGE MOORE, born in 1828 in SYDNEY to GEORGE MOORE Snr and ANN TRACEY. ( Vol 63 no 897 RGI )

GEORGE MOORE’s relationship to the family before the tragedy is not known but he seems to have been a close friend. Soon after the death of PETER MARK READY, he brought the family back to NSW for it would have been an unhappy reminder to all if they had remained. The fact that George had paid for the funeral and married Sarah the following year, taking on 5 children at the same time says something of his regard for them.

 

GEORGE SENIOR AND ANN TRACEY. George Jnr’s father, GEORGE MOORE Snr, was a 19 year old carpenter who had been living at Newcastle, England , when he was sentenced at his trial on 24 October 1821 to a life sentence and transportation to NSW. Arriving aboard the ASIA II on 24 July 1822, he was assigned to work for SOLOMON LEVY in SYDNEY and in 1826 received permission from the Governor to marry. His marriage to ANN TRACEY who had come free to the Colony, took place on 5 February 1827 and over the next 24 years they had a family of three sons. GEORGE 1828. HENRY 1832  WILLIAM 1842.and a daughter MARY in 1851. George had received a conditional pardon from the Governor in 1837 and lived until 17 April 1883.

 

GEORGE MOORE Jnr and SARAH settled down in SYDNEY and three years later a son WILLIAM THOMAS MOORE was born, the first of their three children. A daughter ESMA was born in 1870 and the last of their children HENRY THOMAS MOORE was born in 1874.

Seeing an opening, GEORGE MOORE Jnr set up as a PRODUCE MERCHANT at 165 Sussex Street Sydney with the family residence at 92 GLEBE STREET, GLEBE. it was here in this area that the children went to school and grew to maturity until on the 4th April 1874, Sarah Ann Ready married WILLIAM HENRY WATSON, a blacksmith from NEW ZEALAND. Four years later, in 1878, her sister ELIZABETH HANNAH READY, married JOHN SMITH and on the 10 June 1879, three months before the establishment of the first steam trams in Sydney, the last of PETER MARK READY’S daughters CATHERINE LOUISA was married to JOSEPH HOWE.

1897 saw the marriage of HENRY MOORE their younger half brother to ELLEN MCPHEE, setting up home across the road from his parents at No 75 GLEBE ROAD GLEBE. Esma Moore appears not to have married.

At the time GEORGE MOORE died , Sarah and he were living in no 94 Glebe Road Glebe, the house next door to their original home. it was here that Sarah died on 17 October 1910. Their graves are in the Church of England Section of Rookwood Cemetery along with the body of one of Sarah’s grandchildren FREDERICK BENSON READY.

There is some evidence that SARAH and PETER MARK READY may have quarrelled on the night so long before when he was killed, for a saying has come down through their daughter Sarah Ann Watson’s branch of the family ;

“ NEVER SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR HUSBAND IN ANGER FOR HE MAY FALL DOWN A MINE.”

SARAH ANN(BENSON) READY m 30/10/1883 GEORGE MOORE JNR
WILLIAM THOMAS
1865-1872
ESMA
1868
HENRY THOMAS
1874-19??
M ELLEN MCPHEE

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

FROM MARILYN;  George Moore married Sarah Ann Ready in Sydney not Victoria, have a marriage transcript and it says Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth St, Sydney, witnesses Henry Samuels (step father) and Jane Samuels!!  Hadn’t noticed before but this must be a half sister, but is she ‘Jane’ or ‘Hannah’.

Their 3rd child, Henry Thomas Moore who married Ellen McPhee, then their 2nd child Leslie Francis Moore who married Gladys May Robinson, then their 1st child Gladys Ivy Moore who married , Allen William Roberts

TRIAL OF GEORGE MOORE SENIOR

GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS, GEORGE MOORE, Theft > pocketpicking, 24th October 1821.

Reference Number: t18211024-151
Offence: Theft ; pocketpicking
Verdict: Guilty; Guilty
Punishment: Transportation

FROM TRIALS OF THE OLD BAILEY ONLINE http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18211024-151-defend1366&div=t18211024-151#highlight

1324. GEORGE WILLIAM LEWIS and GEORGE MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of James Larbalesher , from his person .

JAMES LARBALESHER . On Monday last, between twelve and one o’clock at night, I was at the corner of Hatton-garden , coming home with my wife, several people passed near me, I felt and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner Lewis give it to a woman. I took him and the woman. Moore came up and said, "What have you to do with this woman, she has nothing of yours." I called the watch and took Moore too as an accomplice; he endeavoured to escape, but I pursued and took him. I do not know what became of the woman. I am sure I saw it in Lewis’s hand.

BENJAMIN RUSHBROOK . I was parting from a few friends at the corner of Hatton-garden. I heard a bustle, and saw Moore lay hold of the prosecutor, and say "What have you to do with this woman, she has no handkerchief of yours." The prosecutor took him, the woman escaped with the handkerchief.

THOMAS BARTLET . The prisoners were given in my charge.

LEWIS’S Defence. I was out of employ and was distressed, my parents having a large family I did not like to live on them, which caused me to keep late hours. I humbly implore mercy.

MORRIS’S Defence. I got intoxicated and shoved one of these gentlemen, but what else I did I cannot say. I was in the woman’s company.

LEWIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

MORRIS – GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

New Edition of the 1831 Census

FROM STAFFORSHIRE UNIVERSITY

New Edition of the 1831 Census

The Victorian Census Project has now digitised the entire 1831 census for the whole of Great Britain and its offshore islands of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. A copy of the full census in machine-readable form will be available from the Data Archive, at the University of Essex, in early 2005. By clicking on the appropriate links below a new version of the 1831 census, reworked according to registration district in England and Wales, and hundred in Scotland, can be downloaded.

http://www.staffs.ac.uk/schools/humanities_and_soc_sciences/census/vichome.htm

BACK ON THE BEEJAPORE 1853

FROM TWAS HARD TO DIE FRAE HAME

‘IT WAS HARD TO
DIE FRAE HAME’:
DEATH, GRIEF AND MOURNING AMONG SCOTTISH MIGRANTS TO NEW ZEALAND,
1840 -1890.

 

By
Debra Powell
A Thesis
Submitted to the University of Waikato
in fulfilment of the
requirements for the degree of
Master of Arts
in History
2007

Infectious diseases, chronic illness, accidents at sea, dysentery and diarrhoea, and the debilitating effects of constant seasickness on pregnant women and breast-feeding mothers, all took a toll on passenger numbers. Migrants were not unaware of the risks involved. The loss of babies and infants was considered an inevitable consequence of long seaboard journeys. William Usherwood on board the Beejapore to Sydney in 1853 expressed a common sentiment when he wrote: ‘The … adults are all in good health, we have lost several children but this was quite expected, being always the case’.

EMIGRATION 1848

Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, May 2, 1850

 

 

1848 EMIGRATION Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, May 2, 1850 ass emig The Bristol Mercury (Bristol, England), Saturday, June 24, 1854; Issue 3353.

 

 

EMIGRANTS FROM THE FAMILY :

YEAR SHIP NAME
1838 BRILLIANT JESSIE(JENNET, JANET) MCLEAN MOTHER OF MARY ANN MCNEIL
1839 JAMES MORAN MCLEODS AND MACKAYS
1849 VICTORIA WILLIAM AND MARY ANN SANDERS
1853 WILLIAM BROWN JACKSONS
1853 BEEJAPORE CRAIGS AND HURRELLS

CRIME CITY

The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 6 October 1885,

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3449980

Fraudulent Insolvency.-Albert Gross-
man was charged on remand with fraudulent
insolvency. Mr. Unmack appeared to prosecute,
and Mr. Gore Jones appeared for the accused.
Captain Gruer deposed that on the night of
the 15th September the accused came on board
the steamer Kalara at Southport and took a
passage to the Tweed River, and went ashore in

a boat by himself; witness saw him selling
jewellery at the hotel where he was staying.
Senior-constable Biffin, stationed at Murwil-
lumbah, New South Wales, deposed to the

accused taking out a hawker’s license at Mur-
willumbah on the 21st September, when he
stated he was going to hawk jewellery which
he purchased at Davis’, in Brisbane ; on the
22nd September he arrested the accused by
virtue of a warrant and found £42 on his per-
son, and took possession of a quantity of jewel-
lery and a bank-book which the accused said
was his property at the hotel where Grossman
was lodging at the time; he made an inventory of
the property and papers he found in the pos-
session of the accused, and he subsequently
handed the property and papers to Detective
Grimshaw. At this stage the accused was re-
manded for a week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

stencils2_21525_md

 

PERMISSION GRANTED

Today I received an email from PHIL READY, who with his wife Lois, ( descendant of 2nd fleet) compiled READY OR NOT . Hours and hours he tells me in the Mitchell Library and many cemeteries. Phil’s work was one of the major initiating factors for me in this venture. He has given me full permission to use his research . Thank you, indeed, Phil.

NEW SITE FOR DR CLAY DJUBAL’S ALTER EGO – HAVE GRAVITY WILL THREATEN

http://havegravity.com/

About HGWT

Originally founded in Armidale (NSW) as S.T.D. Music, Hire and Promotion (1983) by Clay Djubal, Have Gravity Will Threaten (HGWT) is an independent specialist publisher of music, plays, poetry and images from writers, musicians, composers, bands and photographers who emerged out of the New England region of New South Wales during the ‘pub rock’ era of the 1970s and 1980s. After being based in Sydney during the mid- late 1980s HGWT was re-established in Stafford Heights (Brisbane) in 1993.

 

READ ON :

CLAY N IZ 005

 

TALES OF THE TWEED AND SUGAR IN THE NLA NEWSPAPERS

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1306169

BRISBANE COURIER FRIDAY 7 JANUARY 1870

READ FULL ARTICLE FOR Guilfoyle’s description of landscape and flora as well as local residents as he sails up the Tweed River in his small boat.

 

000_2325

Mr Guilfoyle also speaks of the Brisbane Botanic Gardens.

THE TWEED RIVER.

By M. Guilfoyle.

Although several of the local papers have
given publicity to the object which I had in
visiting the Tweed-valley, for the purpose of

establishing a sugar plantation and a tropical
nursery, I am tempted to say something in
praise of this most beautiful river, merely for
the purpose of making known to those who have
an idea of cultivating the sugar cane what
might be done there by perseverance and a
small amount of capital. The Tweed is the
most northern river of New South Wales. At
half-past 5 o’clock on Wednesday, the 10th of
November, my party and myself, &c, left
Sydney, and arrived at 9 o’clock at night, on the
following Friday, off the Heads or entrance to
the river

READ ON

MCLEOD ON CONDONG PLAINS

So far we have placed John and Normal Bell with their families on the TWEED RIVER. We also have their sister Wilhelmina who married GEORGE DINSEY. There is a MR BELL christian name unknown supervising at ABBOTSFORD MILL( I don’t yet know which mill that was. ) Now a JOHN MCLEOD appears and McLeod is the maiden name of the mother WILHELMINA who came on the JAMES MORAN in 1839. She had other children with her whose names I don’t as yet have.

WANTED to Let, on Clearing Leases, Seven FARMS, of from forty to fifty acres each; fine scrub land; river frontage, Tweed River ¡ eight miles from the Heads. Apply to Mr. JOHN M’LEOD, Condong Plains, Tweed River ; or E. W. S. HAYLEY, Southgate, Clarence River. 2575

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1295006

The Brisbane Courier Friday 30 August 1872, page 1.

This is 3 years after JOHN BELL acquires his land and 6 years before he married MARY ANN MCNEIL.

 

And in 1881;

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article919217

he Brisbane Courier Saturday 30 April 1881, page 5

“Unique” writes from the Tweed River:
” On the evening of Easter Monday the rather monotonous course of life on the Tweed was broken by a ball given by the employes of the C.S.R. Company, and which, under the kind auspices of Mr. and Mrs Isaacs, bids fair to become one of the annual events of the neighbourhood. A range of the barracks had been prepared for the festive occasion, and, although the weather was unpropitious, a goodly array of the votaries of Terpsichore assembled. The room had  been most effectively decorated by the hands of f$air neighbours-wreaths, crowns, and pendants of varied colours relieved tbe sombre green of the foliage with which the walls and roof had been profusely ornamented, and with the brilliancy of the lights and the bright eyes and flowing drapery of the ladies, combined to produce a tout ensemble seldom seen in the neighbourhood. Dancing commenced at 8 o’clock to the enlivening strains of three musicians, and dance succeeded dance in rapid succession till long past the small hours of the morning. At a late hour the party broke up with many expressions of pleasure on the part of the hosts that their guests had been sufficiently enterprising to brave such stormy weather, and of hope that on a future occasion Condong might again be honoured by their presence.

 

 

THE COTTAGE

THE COTTAGE BILAMBIL 2008

James had been born to John and Mary Ann by this time and Norman was born in 1881.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3429862 FROM BRISBANE COURIER THURSDAY MAY 8 . In 1884, Mr T Steel from the CONDONG MILL sent a large series of animals to the QUEENSLAND MUSEUM for nomenaclature.and two of those were included in science and named as follows;

    1. a tree frog resembling in coloration an American  species. Now named HYLA FENESTRATA and
    2. a fish of the GENUS GALAXUS which was to be described as GALAXIAS BREVIANALUS

The ABBOTSFORD MILL I find in the BRISBANE COURIER 5 AUGUST 1882 was erected near the JUNCTION – the village now called TUMBULGUM. This one did not belong to the massive COLONIAL SUGAR REFINING COMPANY to which CONDONG belonged. It belonged to PRINGLE, SHANKY and CO. Small but enterprising beginners.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3412851

 

IN 1886 the schooner CONDONG, of the TWEED RIVER, was carrying logs of beech, cedar and pine into BRISBANE. In the same year a general servant was wanted for the CONDONG MILL at 15s per week.

IN 1889 E DOWLING of Condong won 900 pounds in the  TATTERSALLS MELBOURNE- CUP SWEEPS.

And in 1892, the BELLS went south to LAURIETON. Some of the family remained. Wilhelmina Dinsey for one.

AND FROM TUMBULGUM, where I lived from 2002-2005;

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3701412

The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 12 September 1899,

A correspondent of a New South Wales
top-country paper questions whether the
Hunter district is entitled to the credit of
producing the largest pumpkins. He says :
-” I read an account of prolific pumpkins
in the Hunter. The Hunter may be a won-
derful place for pumpkins, but a neighbour
of mine, at Tumbulgum, lost a sow not long

since. He searched everywhere for several
days without success, and at last came to
the conclusion that she was dead.- But one
day, while riding across his farm, he no-

ticed something peculiar about one of his
pumpkins. He rode over to see, and was
surprised to find his sow. She had eaten
her way into the pumpkin, made a bed, and
had a litter of thirteen young ones all inside
the pumpkin

 

the DEATH OF GEORGE DINSEY http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3963005

BELLINGER BITS AND PIECES

http://electronicquill.wordpress.com/2008/10/12/odds-and-ends-on-a-sunday/

48 10 honeymoon urunga 48 13 honeymoon

Joyce and Bruce Sanders honeymooned in Urunga at the mouth of the Bellinger River in 1948. In the 1970s Lynne,Susan and Jon as well as Joyce and Bruce and Susan’s daughter Josefine relocated from Belmore in Sydney to Urunga. The Bellinger then became home to children, grandchildren and husbands. Susan married into the POMROY family of URUNGA and Lynne married into the BRAITHWAITE family of Bellingen.

For today – odds and ends of BELLINGEN in the NLA.

http://electronicquill.wordpress.com/2008/10/12/odds-and-ends-on-a-sunday/

READYS IN NSW STATE RECORDS

Colonial Secretary Index, 1788-1825

READY, Mrs. Housekeeper at Government House, Windsor

1815 Aug 5-1816 May 11

Her salary as housekeeper at Government House, Windsor, paid from the Police Fund (Reel 6038; SZ759 pp.123, 200)

 

READY, Johanna. Dairy woman at Government Dairy

1817 Dec 16

Evidence at inquest on John Holland (Reel 6021; 4/1819 p.274)

READY, John. Overseer of the Government Dairy

1817 Dec 16

Evidence at inquest on John Holland (Reel 6021; 4/1819 p.275)

READY, John ?

1821 Jan 24, May 24

Store receipts of for fresh meat and salt pork (Reel 6051; 4/1748 pp.143, 152, 159, 176)

READY, John ?

1822 Jan 5, May 18

Servant to James Bellamy. On returns of proceedings of the Bench of Magistrates, Parramatta (Fiche 3297; X643 pp.1a, 12)

READY, John

1822 May 4

On return of proceedings of the Bench of Magistrates, Parramatta (Fiche 3297; X643 p.11)

READY, John. Of Windsor

1823 Oct 15

Memorial for land at Patricks Plains (Fiche 3071; 4/1835B No.268 pp.637-40)

1823 May 23; 1824 Jan 30

On list of persons receiving an assigned convict (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D pp.45, 57)

READY, John ?

1823 Oct 16

Re passport issued (Reel 6011; 4/3509 pp.430, 431)

READY, John ?

1824 Jul 24

Runaway from Mulgoa. On return of fines and punishments in the Police Office (Reel 6023; 4/6671 p.83)

READY, John. Of district of Field of Mars ?

1825 Jun 11

Memorial (Fiche 3152; 4/1844A No.678 pp.159-62)

1825 Jun 20

To be victualled from the Store at Parramatta for six months; with his wife and convict servant (Reel 6014; 4/3514 p.515)

READY, John. Per “Three Bees”, 1814; of Parramatta

1820 May 18

Memorial (Fiche 3029; 4/1825A No.637 pp.459-62)

1822 Mar 31-Sep 30

On lists of persons to whom convict mechanics have been assigned (Fiche 3296; X53 pp.8, 20, 34)

1823 Apr 5

On return of allotments in the town of Parramatta; listed as Raidy (Fiche 3265; 4/7576 pp.1, 9)

1823 May 30

On list of persons who have neglected to pay for convict mechanics assigned up to 31 Mar 1822 (Reel 6010; 4/3508 p.422)

READY, Martin. Per “Three Bees”, 1814; farmer of Airds ?

1820 Apr 13

On list of prisoners transported to Newcastle per “Elizabeth Henrietta”; listed as Reddy (Reel 6007; 4/3501 p.342)

1820 Jun

On list of prisoners at Newcastle claiming expiration of sentence; listed as Reddy (Reel 6007; 4/3502 p.76)

1824 Oct 2

Farmer of Airds. Memorial (Fiche 3106; 4/1839A No.806 pp.283-6)

1824 Aug

Re permission to marry Margaret Hyland in the Roman Catholic Church (Reel 6064, 4/1789 p.112; Reel 6013, 4/3512 p.293)

1825 Nov 2

Of district of Airds. Memorial (Fiche 3152; 4/1844A No.679 pp.163-6)

1825 Dec 9

Convict landed from “Henry Porcher” assigned to at Airds; listed as Reddy (Reel 6016; 4/3516 p.104)

THE TWEED BETWEEN 1869 AND 1892

bell_1_md

SOMEWHERE IN THIS PERIOD JOHN BELL SUSTAINED THE INJURIES THAT TOOK THEM SOUTH TO LAURIETON. WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM ? “THEY” SAY IT WAS AN ACCIDENT IN THE CANE.

1872 http://www.family.joint.net.au/indexnew.php?mid=1&cid=43

DISTANCE 566 MILES NORTH OF SYDNEY 

MAIL CLOSES AT GENERAL POST BY CLARENCE RIVER STEAMERS, AND BY SAILING VESSELS
AS OPPORTUNITY OFFERS
MAIL ARRIVES AT POST TOWN SUNDAY 4 P.M. AND BY SAILING VESSELS AS OPPORTUNITY
OFFERS
MAIL LEAVES FOR SYDNEY TUESDAY 8 A.M. AND BY SAILING VESSELS AS OPPORTUNITY
OFFERS
MAIL ARRIVES AT SYDNEY BY CLARENCE AND RICHMOND RIVER STEAMERS, AND BY SAILING
VESSELS

ROUTE BY CLARENCE AND RICHMOND RIVER STEAMERS, KYNNUMBOON.
 
INCLUDES NORMAN AND JOHN BELL AT KYNNUMBOON.

from the BRISBANE COURIER TUESDAY 25 DECEMBER 1877 page 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1368785

The heat had been intense but was now intermittent with a sky ominously overcast. They had had showers and a thunderstorm had passed over.

The sugar mill mentioned in this article is called the ABBOTSFORD SUGAR MILL but I haven’t so far found another reference to it. Certainly the only Mill on the Tweed now is the CONDONG mill. Down at the TWEED HISTORICAL SOCIETY, there is an image of BELL’s Wharf which I shall purchase next time I am there. When I first looked, I didn’t realise the presence of the Bells in this area. The article in the BRISBANE COURIER of 1877, speaks of field operations and crushing going on ‘ merrily’. They have a complement of 20-25 men and in the field they are supervised by Mr Byrne and in the crushing by MR BELL. I shall approach the Murwillumbah Hospital one day and see whether they have any records that might explain the ‘accident’ which invalided John Bell. This Mr Bell at the mill might or might not be John. It is a year before his marriage to Mary Ann McNeil. There may well have been other Bells here  but Norman is not likely to be one of them because his children are being born down south by then. 

There was also an ascent being made to the top of MT WARNING to have a display of fireworks on the summit for CHRISTMAS. We seem to be somewhat lacking in vision in 2008. They were making a picnic party of the excursion with several gentlemen from Brisbane expected to attend.

The COLONIAL SUGAR REFINING COMPANY was acquiring land for extensions.

Two public schools are noted; MURWILLUMBAH and JUNCTION.

 

In 1879 and 1881, Tenders were taken for the conveyance of the MAILS

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article899633

The Brisbane Courier Saturday 16 August 1879, page 3.

Nerang Creek and Murwillumbah, to Mudgeraba and Tallebudgera, by horse, twice a week, for one or two years.

 

and http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article819901

The Maitland Mercury… Saturday 17 September 1881, page 3

Lismore and Kynnumboon or Murwillumbah,

once a week.

3. Lismore and Tirrania, once a week.

84. Lismore, Wollongbar, Alstonville, and BallinB,

once a week.

85. Kynnumboon or Murwillumbah, and Tumbulgum

three times a week.

horseshoe_24115_lg

In 1882 JOHN WAUGH was manager of the COMMERCIAL BANK in MURWILLUMBAH.  

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3453268

The Brisbane Courier Wednesday 25 November 1885, page 3

Constable Biffin, of the New South Wales police, deposed to the arrest and search of prisoner at Murwillumbah, on the 22nd Sep-tember. He deposed to the jewellery produced being that found by him in prisoner’s boxes.

READ ON FOR A FELONY IN INSOLVENCY AND YOUNG ADOLPH GROSSMAN

 

 

IN 1887 A ROYAL MAIL COACH ran from TALLEDBUDGERA TO MURWILLUMBAH daily except for MONDAYS at 7 am. and one from MURWILLUMBAH TO TALLEBUDGERA daily except for MONDAYS at 12.30pm.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3461689

TWEED ROADS, &c http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1332348

IN 1889, MRS BLEKINSOP’s EMPLOYMENT AGENCY in BRISBANE was seeking a cook and a laundress for an hotel in MURWILLUMBAH

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3492278

The Brisbane Courier Monday 11 February 1889, page 2.

1889 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3494704
The Brisbane Courier Wednesday 10 April 1889, page 4

Customs officer R. B. Downie, stationed at
Tallebudgera, reports to the Collector of
Customs, under date 4th April, that during
last month he patrolled the border from the
Murwillumbah Crossing to the Tweed River
Heads. The roads, especially between Talle-
budgera and the border, are in a very bad

state from the recent heavy rains. During the
month there arrived by coaoh from New South
Wales five passengers, while seven passengers
left for New South Wales during the same
period. A good number of swagmen have
been going over to the Tweed in search of
work. The country in the neighbourhood of
Tallebudgera is looking exceedingly well, and
there is plenty of grass and water.

 

49641_fern_spore_lg

1891 JANE HARRISON v JOHN HARRISON
he Brisbane Courier Thursday 19 March 1891, page 3
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3523756
 

 

_______________________________

GoldCoastHistory 1851 – 1900  http://www.goldcoast.com.au/about-gold-coast/gold-coast-history-2.html

Joshua Bray – (1838-1918) http://www.tweedhistory.org.au/murwillumbah/bray.shtml

ABSTRACT In March 1864 Samuel returned with his wife and child, shortly after them Joshua Bray joined them and they became partners. In 1865 Joshua returned to Tumut and became engaged to Rosalie (called Gertrude). He returned to the Tweed with a carpenter who built him a house of pit saw timber, Joshua named the house, ‘Kynnumboon’, an Aboriginal name for the land on which it was built. Joshua and Gertrude were married in Armidale NSW, they then went by gig to Singleton, train to Newcastle and boat to Sydney for a short honeymoon. They returned to the Tweed going by boat to Brisbane, Qld. and then rode down to the Tweed on horseback.

NEW SOUTH WALES SHIPWRECKS http://oceans1.customer.netspace.net.au/nsw-wrecks.html

Byron. Wooden screw steamship, 145/99 tons. #101024. Built at Terrigal, NSW, 1891, as a schooner; reg. Sydney, 75/1891. Lbd 96.2 x 20.4 x 8.1 ft. Sprang a leak in a gale and abandoned off Lake Macquarie, off Nine Mile Beach, Red Head, NSW, 24 May 1896. The Newcastle lifeboat rescued the crew. See also topsail schooner Condong and barquentine Karoola lost in the same gale.  [LN – 99 tons],[ASR],[MR],[SAN],[BNN]
@ Wrecksite known, south-east of Redhead Point.

NEW SOUTH WALES SHIPWRECKS http://oceans1.customer.customer.netspace.net.au/nsw-main.html

_______________________________

Murwillumbah http://www.smh.com.au/news/New-South-Wales/Murwillumbah/2005/02/17/1108500197934.html

ABSTRACT

Sugarcane was first grown in the valley in 1869 as free selectors began to take up land. However, two years later, a visitor noted that the river was covered on both sides by dense scrub with but a few dispersed dwellings. One of the selectors – Joshua Bray (the future police magistrate) – is said to have adopted the name ‘Murwillumbah’ from the local Aborigines. It is thought to describe either a good place for camping beside the river or a good place to catch possums.

The townsite was surveyed in 1872. The post office was transferred from Kynnumboon (just to the north) in 1877, the school was transferred from Tumbulgum in 1878, a courthouse was built and the first bank was established in 1880. The first sugar mill in the area also opened in 1880. A ferry service replaced the punt in 1888. However, settlement remained limited until the railway arrived in 1894 from Lismore via Mullumbimby

Cane Farming – Getting Established http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/Museum/History/Content/sugar1.aspx

 

Sunshine Sugar http://www.sunshinesugar.com.au/sust_energy.htm

 

Cane cutter knife c.1950s http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/exhibition/objectsthroughtime/caneknife/

 

TWEED RIVER MANAGEMENT PLAN ADVISORY COMMITTEE

November 1998 http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/Waterways/pdfs/rm_bankmanagementplan.htm

 

Kynnumboon Bridge, Queensland Rd,Murwillumbahhttp://www.aussieheritage.com.au/listings/nsw/Murwillumbah/KynnumboonBridge/5422

 

THE NORTH COAST TRAIN LINE AS IT ONCE WAS 

Casino – Old Casino 6/11/1905
Old Casino – Lismore 19/10/1903
Lismore – Mullumbimby 15/5/1894
Mullumbimby – Murwillumbah 24/12/1894
Murwillumbah – Condong 24/12/1894

http://fang.omni.com.au/trains/Murbah.html 

 

Australia’s sugar industry

By Robert F. McKillop

http://www.lrrsa.org.au/LRR_SGRa.htm

 

 

 

BACK ON THE TWEED RIVER

march tweed 002

 

WHATEVER it was the BELLs were doing, they are listed as landholders from 1869-1890 , Norman and Agnes have JANET LAURIE and WILLIMINA here in 1871 and 1872, JOHN and MARY ANN have children on the Tweed between 1879 and 1890 and at least JANET LAURIE marries in Murwillumbah in 1898.

JAMES and WILHELLMINA BELL’s children  are listed at the time of Wilhelmina’s death 2 March 1903 as;

NAME AGE COMMENTS ON NSW BDM LISTINGS
MARY(LAURIE) 57

MARY’s marriage is listed as 1866 to ALEXANDER J  LAWRIE in DUNGOG . DOD Stroud 1918

WILHELMINA(DINSEY) 56

MARRIES GEORGE DINSEY IN 1865 IN DUNGOG. This would indicate that Wilhelmina was Mrs Dinsey by the time the Bells moved north. Dinsey Creek is between Condong and Tumbulgum. She dies in 1911 in Murwillumbah.

NORMAN 54 Married AGNES in 1870 at DUNGOG
JOHN 52 Marries MARY ANN MCNEIL in 1878 at TAREE
MARGARET(MCEACHRAN) 50

Listed as an 1880 marriage to  MACEACHRAN JOHN IN LISMORE
Death recorded in 1920 at MURRUMBURRAH.

ELIZABETH(WALKER) 48 I cannot find a WALKER marrying a BELL as yet but ELIZABETH WALKER does die in 1948 in GLOUCESTER.
CHRISTINA(QUIRK) 47 Nor for CHRISTINA as yet but I do have her death In Murwillumbah in 1944 so she was a Tweed woman.

 

 

JOHN and MARY ANN’s 9 children with places and years of birth;

JAMES
1879
TWEED RIVER

NORMAN
1881
TWEED RIVER

ANNE MCLEOD
1883
TWEED RIVER in 1918 married STANLEY WITCHARD in TAREE.

JANET
1885
TWEED RIVER

LESLIE DONALD RAYMOND
1887
TWEED RIVER

MARY HENRIETTA
1890
MURWILLUMBAH married THOMAS MCLENNAN IN TAREE 1914

ROY MCNEIL
1895
LAURIETON

WILHELMINA ELIZABETH
1897
LAURIETON

WILLIAM ALLEN MARRIED JESSIE SARAH READY

 

000_2889

JOHN BELL LANDHOLDER PRIOR TO 1892

 

YOUNGBUTTS ETC 018 YOUNGBUTTS ETC 019
ALONG THE TWEED RIVER NEAR CONDONG EARLY 2008
YOUNGBUTTS ETC 017 YOUNGBUTTS ETC 016
IN THE VICINITY OF THE BELL LAND ON TWEED VALLEY WAY

 

 

 

JOHN BELL’S land survey is dated 1869. His marriage to MARY ANN MCNEIL took place 27 June 1878 down South in the Taree district. Was he in the north before that or did he not come north until that time ? 

From ROY BURTON; at the time of the marriage John gave his place of residence as RAWDON VALE district of GLOUCESTER. Witnesses to the marriage were JOSEPH LAURIE and MARGARET BELL. JOSEPH LAURIE Senior owned property in the RAWDON VALE locality. The witness Joseph was probably the 5th son of Joseph Snr. Refer to the Early History of the Camden Haven p 16. “THE LAURIES”. He was probably best man and was living at PEACH GROVE now known as LAURIETON at the time of the marriage. MARGARET BELL is possibly JOHN’S SISTER. It is possible John worked for the Lauries at Rawdon Vale. After the wedding they moved to the Tweed River where John was cane farming. he was invalided after an accident and the family move from the Tweed to Laurieton in 1892. John died in 1919 and Mary Ann died in 1935.

We still have not located JOHN’S birth in BDMS.

 

CONNECTIONS FROM MURWILLUMBAH AND THE TWEED – BELLS, BIGNELLS, LAURIES AND MORE

NORMAN BELL was the older brother of JOHN BELL wife of MARY ANN MCNEIL. They had adjoining land at CONDONG on the TWEED.

Their parents were JAMES AND WILHELMINA as noted elsewhere. James was the housebreaker transported from Glasgow in 1831 on the YORK and WILHELMINA was the daughter of WILLIAM MCLEOD and JANET MACKAY who came on the JAMES MORAN in 1839. They married in 1839 at MAITLAND when WILHELMINA was 17 years old. Check in the search engine to the right for further details. It appears at this time that the Mcleods and Mackays came as a result of the ruthless clearances of the Sutherland Shires in the HIGHLANDS of Scotland. In the 1860s the BELL boys have land on the TWEED. The NSW BDM records indicate that their father JAMES died in 1859( to be verified). I do not know what brought the boys ( and perhaps more members of their family north from the Maitland Area). Land is also indicated to belong to WILHELLMINA BELL – mother ? sister ? daughter ?

NORMAN BELL was born 1845 and died 15 June 1924 . He is buried in BARRINGTON CEMETERY. His occupations are listed at TWEED RIVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY as farmer/grazier. Whilst on Tweed he was resident at CONDONG. Norman married in 1870 at DUNGOG NSW. His wife was AGNES FRASER HIGGINS and her mother was JANET LAURIE. As my mother used to tell me the BELLS and the LAURIES were ‘tied in somehow”. Her father was JOHN HIGGINS. Agnes Higgins was born at Pt Stephens in 1846 and died in CHATSWOOD, SYDNEY in 1929.

Their children;

names birthdate and place marriage date and spouse death date and place
JANET LAURIE 1871 TWEED RIVER 1898 GEORGE BIGNELL MURWILLUMBAH  
WILLIMINA A 1872 TWEED RIVER JOHN A. GUNN COPELAND 1895 1911 STROUD NSW
JAMES WALTER 1874 PORT STEPHENS   15-8-1886 NSW
AGNES MARY 1876 PORT STEPHENS GORDON A D CLARK STROUD 1915  
ELIZABETH J 1878 PORT STEPHENS JOHN STACE PORT STEPHENS 1903
MARGARET CHRISTINA 1881 BARRINGTON THOMAS FARLEY CRICK SYDNEY 1907  
MARY HENRIETTA 1883 COPELAND WILLIAM JAMES MARTIN STROUD 1907 22-8-1938 KRAMBACH NSW
JOHN JAMES 1889 COPELAND   1923 BARRINGTON
NOREINE F 1893 COPELAND    

From these dates it appears Norman left the Tweed district by the early 1870s whereas John’s Children are born on Tweed between 1879 and 1890 with the youngest being born at Laurieton in the early 90s. Hmm. A rethink required again.

image

image

THE INFORMATION I HAVE IS THAT NO 49 IS JOHN BELL’S LAND . ( YET TO BE VERIFIED AS ONE MAP INDICATES CONDONG AND ONE IS FURTHER ALONG NEAR STOTTS CREEK)

 

_____________________________________________________________

GEORGE  BIGNELL. IN 1898 AT MURWILLUMBAH MARRIED JANET LAURIE BELL DAUGHTER OF NORMAN BELL WHO WAS BROTHER OF JOHN BELL, GRANNY’S HUSBAND.  http://www.aif.adfa.edu.au:8080/showPerson?pid=22518

 

______________________________________________________________

FROM THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1368785

There is mention of a MR BELL managing the ABBOTSFORD SUGAR MILL on the TWEED.

 

_______________________________________________________________

MURWILLUMBAH LINKS

http://www.mit.edu/~dfm/genealogy/sercombe.html Sercombe Families

GRANNY BELL IN LAURIETON 1892 – NOV 5 1935

JOHN BELL WAS INJURED IN A CANE ACCIDENT -so we are told- on the Tweed. By 1892 the land at Condong is no longer in his name and John becomes known only as the INVALID MR BELL. The Bells then move to LAURIETON and Granny lives there till her death on Nov 5 1935.

THE CHILDREN OF JOHN AND MARY ANN BELL :

NAME DOB PLACE OF BIRTH
JAMES 1879 TWEED RIVER
NORMAN 1881 TWEED RIVER
ANNE MCLEOD 1883 TWEED RIVER
JANET 1885 TWEED RIVER
LESLIE DONALD RAYMOND 1887 TWEED RIVER
MARY HENRIETTA 1890 MURWILLUMBAH
ROY MCNEIL 1895 LAURIETON
WILHELMINA ELIZABETH 1897 LAURIETON
WILLIAM ALLEN 1898 LAURIETON

 

_____________________________________

LINKS TO THE BELLS IN LAURIETON.

SON OF JOHN AND MARY ANN BELL ( GRANNY).

ROY MCNEIL BELL.

Regimental number
1785

Religion
Presbyterian

Occupation
Baker

Address
Laurieton PO, Laurieton, New South Wales

Marital status
Single

Age at embarkation
20

Next of kin
Father, John Bell, Laurieton, New South Wales

Enlistment date
14 March 1916

Rank on enlistment
Private

Unit name
34th Battalion, 2nd Reinforcement

AWM Embarkation Roll number
23/51/2

Embarkation details
Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A15 Port Sydney on 4 September 1916

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

 

LAURIETON IN THE 1890s

Marshalls of Laurieton – A Family Who Gave More Than Most for King and Country http://www.alchin.info/volume5/volume5_007_sawyers_east_indoa_docks_descendants_william_alchin.html

 

On 5th November 1891, James STACE who was 67, died in the De Frains Timber Mill at Laurieton. Twelve (12) years later, Mary also passed away with the couple buried at Laurieton Cemetery.

http://www.whatismyname.zoomshare.com/2.html

 

Sussex to New South Wales:
– the Fairhall Family

http://www.fairhall.id.au/families/web/p391.htm

 

John Flynn http://www.midcoast.com.au/~rotohous/john.htm

 

WAUCHOPE PUBLIC SCHOOL http://www.bebo.com/Blog.jsp?MemberId=4044601510

GRANNY BELL: BORN ON THE MANNING RIVER IN 1859

c-parrot02

3708/1878

BELL
JOHN

MARRIED

MACNEIL
MARY A
MANNING RIVER

3708/1878

BELL
JOHN

 

MCNEIL
MARY A
MANNING RIVER

 

Born at Taree on June 27 1859 she married John Bell in 1878 and from this union came a family of nine children : James, Norman, Anne, Janet, Mary, Roy, Elizabeth and William.

Henry Flett (ca.1810-1877), was born at Caithness, Scotland and arrived at NSW in 1834. In 1841 he married Mary Wynter whose father Lieutenant William Wynter owned the Taree Estate. After buying the Taree Estate from his father-in-law, Flett divided it into tenant farms. He had Taree surveyed and laid out as a town in 1854. He was elected a member of the NSW Legislative Assembly for the seat of The Hastings (1859-1864).

http://acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=442656

 

LINKS TO THE MANNING IN THE 1800s;

http://acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=442656

Manning Valley Historical Society

http://www.manninghistorical.org/P&E8.htm

 

COMMERCIAL BANKING COMPANY OF SYDNEY OFFICERS CLUB http://www.cbcbank.com.au/

 

PEERS OF MARY ANNE MCNEIL.

 

Family History pages of Diane Edwards JAMES WILLIAM TISDELL http://www.diane.sheather.co.uk/_sgg/m3m1_1.htm

 

Brabyns and Mills http://www.ayton.id.au/gary/genealogy/MyAncestors_brabyn_mills.htm BRABYNS ARE IN TAREE AS WELL.

 

http://familyhistory.celyoneill.com/davis.html  The Davis Family

 

BULMER – Lord http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GENANZ/2005-04/1112764594

 

Descendants of *Patrick Hough http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ewfamily/Descendants%20of%20Patrick%20Hough.htm THOMAS3 HOUGH

(JOHN, PATRICK HOUGH ) was born 1858 in Raymond Terrace, NSW, Australia, and died 1957. He married BRIDGET A MOYLAN 1887 in Taree, NSW, Australia. She was born 1859 in Taree, NSW, Australia

Bridget Agnes MOYLAN Born 11th December 1859 in Taree. http://www.pmoylan.org/pages/family/KenMoylan/OtherMoylanFamilies.html

Ancestors of Marc Hillman http://users.tpg.com.au/mhillman/hillman/f14.htm  (CHECK Mary HOSEGOOD This family includes DEVONSHIRE people possbly inc Tiverton. One Homeplace of Sanders) It also includes a Bellinger man;

Thomas Burchill FOGARTY  AKA: John Thomas SHAW           Born: 1866 – Bellingen River, NSW, Australia

 

OwenJones Family Historyhttp://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~owenjones/des_gen/ind874.html

 

Taree Estate Pioneer Cemetery   http://www.ozgenonline.com/aust_cemeteries/nsw/greater_taree/tareestate.htm 

 

PARTRIDGES http://www.ezitree.com.au/HTML/index015.htm TAREE AND MCLEAY These PARTRIDGES are connected to the SANDERS SANDERS, Charles Henry  1858 Macleay River NSW AUS-16Jul1926 Macksville NSW AUS

SANDERS, Ernest Albert  22Dec1862 Macleay River NSW AUS-20Nov1911 Kempsey NSW AUS
SANDERS, Mary Ann  – (see Mary Ann PARTRIDGE)

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3512543

SHIPS THAT NEVER RETURNED.

THAT LEFT AUSTRALIAN Ports.

The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 25 March 1890, page 6.

AUSTRALIAN FLOTILLA

           http://www.morpeth-p.schools.nsw.edu.au/History.htm

 

          Minor shipping lines and Ship owners  registered in NEW SOUTH WALES

GALLOWGATE GLASGOW IN THE 1830s

vkgc_misc100

HOMETOWN OF JAMES BELL. TRIED THERE FOR HOUSEBREAKING IN 1830 AND TRANSPORTED ON THE YORK ARRIVING IN NSW IN FEB 1831.

GLASGOW MAILS Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, March 19, 1832; Issue 17262.

CALEDONIAN MERCURY MONDAY MARCH 19 1832

GALLOWGATE2he Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, September 10, 1831; Issue 8172.

NEWCASTLE COURANT SATURDAY SEP 10 1831

YORK SAILS2 Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, October 4, 1830; Issue 1617.

HAMPSHIRE TELEGRAPH AND SUSSEX CHRONICLE MONDAY OCT 4 1830

___________________________________________________________________

THE YORK 1831

(NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH THE HULK YORK IN ENGLAND)

Convict Ship arrivals – 1831http://www.historyaustralia.org.au/twconvic/tiki-print.php?page=1831

 

SHIP           MASTER        SURGEON               DEPARTED   ARRIVED    MALE CONVICTS FEMALE CONVICTS

York 1831  Leary, Dan.  France, Campbell  Sheerness     Sydney       200                      0

 

(http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/shipNSW2.html
Vessel              Arrived    Port    Sailed      From     Days   Embarked   Sydney    Hobart  Norfolk I    Master               Surgeon
                                                                               M    F    M    F    M    F    M    F
York I (2)         07 02 1831  NSW   04 09 1830  Sheerness   156   200        198                          Dan Leary              Campbell France

 

York I (2) transported only 8 male Irish convicts http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/ships.htm

 

Feb. 8.-YORK (ship), 478 tons, Leary master, from London, Campbell & Co. agents; 198 male prisoners and government stores.)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199042

 

CONVICTS ON BOARD:

CARLISLE James York 1831

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198935

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 8 February 1831, page 2.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1931.

Monday Evening.

The York has brought English news to the last week in September. We have now before us London papers to the 27th of that month, and the first intelligence we have to announce is of a most painful nature, being the sudden DEATH OF MR. HUSKISSON

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198936

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 8 February 1831, page 2. News

Shipping Intelligence

ARRIVALS.

From New Zealand, on Sunday last, the schooner Currency Lass, with 80 tons flax.

From Newcastle, same day, the cutter Fairy.

From London, yesterday, whence she sailed the 4th of September, and from Portsmouth the 29th, the ship York (429 tons), Captain Leary, with 200 male prisoners, 2 having died on the passage. Surgeon Superintendent, Campbell France, Esq. The guard consists of 40 non-commissioned officers and privates of the 17th Regiment, who are accompanied by 4 women and 2 children. Passengers, Colonel Despard, 17th Regt., Mrs. Despard and 3 children, Ensign Owen, and Ann Forster and C. Donohoe, servants to Mrs. Despard.

REMAINING IN THE HARBOUR.

SHIPS.- Louisa, Forth, Nancy, Royal Admiral, Clarkstone, Sir George Murray, Dryade, Denmark Hill, Mary Ann, Andromeda, Burrell, Janet hat, Vittoria, Elizabeth, Albion, Resource, and York.

BRIGs.-Elizabeth, Wellington, Norval, Couvier Thistle, Governor Phillip, and Lord Rodney.

SCHOONERS- Henry, Resolution, Admiral Gifford, Schnapper, Darling, New Zealander, and Currency Lass.

CUTTERS-Emma, Fairy, and Letitia Bingham.
Total.-Ships, 17 ; Brigs, 7 ; Schooners, 7 ;  Cutter, 3 ; in all, 34.

 

NEWS OF THE YORK 1831

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198965 The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 10 February 1831, page 2.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2198968

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 10 February 1831, page 2.

We are requested to correct a mistake which occurred in the notice of the arrival of the ship York (Captain Leary) in our last number. The burthen of the York is there stated to be 429 tons, instead of 478 tons, as appears by the register, -which we bave seen. This vessel is not the old York, as some persons, we are informed, suppose.; but was built, in the year 1819, at Southwick, in Durham. Captain Leary, the commander, is an old and much respected visitant to this colony.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199140

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 19 February 1831, page 2.

The male prisoners by the York were landed yesterday morning. Among them are a considerable number of strong healthy labourers accustomed to agriculture, who will doubtless prove no small acquisition to the settlers who may obtain them. There are also several good mechanics and tradesmen.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199405

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 5 March 1831, page 2

The second division of the 57th regiment, will embark on board the York, for Madras, next Thursday.

The following is the ‘ Return ‘ of a detachment of the 57th Regiment, to embark

on board the ship York, on Saturday next,

for Madras :

Major R. Hunt, Captain J. Brown, lady,
and family ; Lieut. G. Edwards, Lieut. R.
Alexander, Lieut. E. Lockyer, Paymaster
G. H. Green, lady, and family ; 9 Serjeants,
J 2 drummers, 7 corporals, 132′ privates,

15 women, and 39 children.

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199723

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 24 March 1831, page 2.

Attempt at Robbery.-A seaman
belonging to the ship York, having just come ashore
on Saturday evening with ten dollars in his pocket,
was stopped by two fellows opposite the Dock-yard,
who knocked him down, ond then commenced ful-
filling their intentions on his pockets. Jack how-

ever was not disposed to strike, although boarded on
both sides, and defended himself manfully, till Dowd,
with some other constables, came to his assistance,
on whose approach the villains decamped with all
possible expedition, leaving the tar in possession of
all his shot, and cursing them for a couple of lub

belly rascals.

 

YORK 2 article2199895-3-001

DON’T MISS THIS STORY READ ON : http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199895  The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 5 April 1831, page 2.

AND THEN THE POSTCRIPT;

[ POSTSCRIPT, 9 o’CIock, P. M.

_____________

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2199991

The Sydney Gazette and… Saturday 9 April 1831, page 2. News

RETURN OF THE YORK,

We have to announce the gratifying
news of the safe return to port of the ship
York, together with the equally pleasing
intelligence that the apprehensions for

the safety of the crew, which a chain of
circumstances occasioned in the public
mind, turn out to be altogether ground
less. She anchored yesterday evening
about dusk, in Watson’s Bay, the passen
gers and crew all well. From the hasty
particulars which we have been enabled
to glean, it appears that her parting from
the Edward was occasioned by a strong
northerly wind, which induced Captain
Leary to alter his course, and endeavour
to make the passage through Bass’ Straits
When the ship was hailed by Captain
Gilbert, from the Edward, the wind was
so high, that nothing more than a con.
fused sound could be distinguished on

board, and, being unable to lay-to, she
proceeded on her course : the wind
subsequently veered to the southward
and, after beating about the straits for
several days, Captain Leary thought it
most advisable to return to Sydney. We
are most happy at being thus enabled
satisfactorily to allay the ferment which
a rumour so astounding in all the alleged
circumstances which gave rise to it, was
calculated to excite, not only in this Co.
lony, but in every part of the British
dominions to which it might reach.

 

FURTHER TO THE POSTCRIPT

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200039

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 12 April 1831, page 2.

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, LAST.

RETURN OF THE YORK.

We had the heartfelt satisfaction of
announcing in our last, in a hasty Post-
script, the safe return to port of the ship
York, which was supposed, from Captain
Gilbert’s strange story, to have been
piratically seized by the troops she was

conveying to Madras. We must now
give some explanation on the other side,
as derived from the very best authority.

On Sunday, the 27th ult., Captain
Leary, of the York, dined with Captain
Gilbert on board the Edward, and re-
turned to his own ship in the evening,
after arranging for the signals to be made
during that night. This was the last per-
sonal intercourse they had. The wind

was then N. E.

On Monday, the 28th, no communica-
tions took place, “and the wind continued
steady from the N. E.

On Tuesday, the 29th (the memorable
day on which Captain Gilbert supposed
the York to be captured), about 3 o’clock
in the afternoon, Captain Leary, find-
ing the wind so unchangeably contrary,
began to think seriously of putting

ONCE AGAIN. READ ON THIS IS A GRAND STORY.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200039

 

AND THEN THE YORK RETURNS TO SYDNEY AGAIN

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200161

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 19 April 1831, page 2

RETURN OF THE YORK AGAIN!

OUR good friend the York, has visited
us yet once again, having this time en-
countered dangers of no imaginary or
trifling order. She put back on Sunday,
with her rigging a good deal damaged.
The tremendous hurricane of Saturday

night and Sunday morning, was enough
to have foundered the stoutest ship that
ever floated, and when we remember that
it was from the south-east, and how near
the York was to an iron-bound lee-shore,
we may judge how imminent was her
danger, and how providential her escape.
But of this our readers will form a more
adequate conception by the subjoined
extract of a letter from one of the pas-
sengers, written to his friend in Sydney,
immediately after anchoring in Watson’s
Bay.

” You must be a little surprised to “find us
here again : the fears entertained for our
safety on the former occasion were more
sensibly felt by ourselves on this. We
sailed yesterday morning, with a fine wind
from the S.W., the weather looking very
dark and unsettled. About ten o’clock it
changed all round the compass, and at last
settled in the South-East, and increased to
a gale, accompanied with the most awful
thunder, lightning, and the heaviest rain I
ever witnessed, which continued the whole
of the day, and the sea ran to an immense
height. Our fore-top-sail-yard was carried
away-I rather think struck by lightning
the top-sail and two or three other sails

blown to ribbands : two of our boats stove
in. About two o’clock in the morning Cap-
tain Leary came to me, and said it was
necessary to have an additional number of
hands on deck-not that there was any im-
minent danger, but that we were on a lee
shove, and the ship having lost her head
sails, consequently was not easily worked
off. Every assistance was of course af-
forded ; and I am happy to have it in my
power to state to you that no men could

behave better, notwithstanding they had
not a dry shirt to their backs for 24 hour.
As far as my own opinion goes, I feel con-
vinced that his own crew would never have
been able to save the ship from going on
shore, as we were close to the land to the
southward of the Light-house, and the sea
running mountains high. However, thank
divine Providence, we got in as soon as day-
light would permit him to approach the
entrance to the Heads. I am happy to state
how grateful we all feel for Captain Leary’s
zeal and exertions; he never quitted the
deck the whole time; and but for his
thorough knowledge and experience as a
seaman, I really believe we should not have
survived to tell the tale. Our miseries did
not end here ; we bumped two or three
times on the bank at the Sow-and-Pigs.
I hope the ship has not suffered any mate-
rial injury, but it will be as well to have that
ascertained before we make another trial.”

We once more congratulate these brave
troops on their safety, hoping that after
all these untoward events, they will en-
joy a quick and pleasant passage to the
place of destination.

 

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 26 April 1831, page 3 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200267 The York is immediately to be hove down, in order to her undergoing a thorough repair, previously to proceeding to sea once more. She cannot, therefore, leave this spot before the expiration of a month at least. The troops disembarked yesterday morning, and marched hack to their old quarters, looking like any thing but pirates, poor fellows !

 

The Sydney Gazette and… Thursday 28 April 1831, page 2.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200302 The detachment of the 57th Regiment, which disembarked from the York on Monday, proceeded to Parramatta, and not to their old quarters,” as we erroneously stated on Tuesday. ‘

 

AND TO FINISH IT OFF FOR THE YORK IN 1831, THE EDITOR OF THE GAZEETE PERHAPS COULD HAVE BEEN A LITTLRE MORE COMPASSIONATE TO THE POET ON THE YORK.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200162

The Sydney Gazette and… Tuesday 19 April 1831, page 2.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

We thank H. H. for his ‘Dream’, which will be

published in a day or two.

The lines written on board the York are not well measured.

J’s ‘ Lines written during the Thunder-storm on

Saturday last, will probably appear in our next.

____________________________________________________________________

SITES TO SEE RE THE YORK:

http://www.jenwilletts.com/Convict%20Ships.htm CONVICT SHIPS JEN WILLETTS

 

Convicts http://www.coraweb.com.au/convict.htm

 

Prison Hulk Records usually giving the names of convicts http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUS-PT-JACKSON-CONVICTS/2008-07/1215427845

 

CONVICTS TO AUSTRALIA http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/stories.html

 

Ballarat & District Genealogical Society –
Advice for Locating Convict Information  http://www.ballaratgenealogy.org.au/convicts.htm

 

http://www.geocities.com/pennytrueman/chstrans.html 

Joseph IKIN, 35, b. CHS, M, Ploughs, Reaps, Milks, Sows; T: 1831 from Sheerness to Sydney NSW, Ship: York.

John TAYLOR, 23, b. CHS, S, Wheelwright, T: 1831 from Sheerness to Sydney NSW, Ship: York.

 

EVENTS OF 1831 http://www.jenwilletts.com/colonial_events_1831.htm

 

 

The People’s Health

By Milton James Lewis

 

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RANDOM SITES

RE SANDERS:

The Last Farewell

Devon Convicts Transported to Australia 1782 – 1821

 http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/DevonIndexes/LastFarewell.html

 

DEVON

http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/index.html

“A county of England, reaching from the Bristol to the English Channel, and bounded by Cornwall, and Somersetshire, and Dorsetshire. It is 69 miles in length, and 60 in breadth, and is divided into 31 hundreds. It is very hilly, and abounds in huge granite rocks, some of whose peaks are above 1500 feet in height. The highland is covered with wide moors, of which Dartmoor is the most extensive. But in the valleys and lower ground the soil is fertile. Its rivers are the Exe, the Culm, the Dart, the Tamar, the Otter, &c. Some parts of its coasts are composed of lofty cliffs, but at others there is a beautiful sandy shore. The air and climate are so mild and salubrious that invalids often retire to its sea-ports for the winter. Limestone, granite, some building-stone, and a species of wood-coal are found here, as well as some kinds of variegated marble. It produces corn, &c. and fruit trees, especially apples, whence much cider is made. Its fisheries also are of value. Exeter is its chief city. Population, 533, 460. It sends 22 members to parliament.” (From Barclay’s Complete and Universal English Dictionary, 1842.)

HISTORICAL TIMELINE

Compiled by Anne Mavric  http://home.vicnet.net.au/~pioneers/pppg10.htm

GALLOWGATE GLASGOW

WILHELLMINA MCLEOD MARRIES JAMES BELL – FROM GALLOWGATE

 

Glasgow (East Central)  http://gdl.cdlr.strath.ac.uk/airgli/airgli0104.htm

THE GALLOWGATE. – This street is one of the oldest thoroughfares of Glasgow. Its past history is fascinating, but I shall not pause to dwell thereon. Before the opening of London Street it was one of the chief highways out or into the city. Its leading shops were occupied by prominent citizens who did considerable business, especially among those who came in from the surrounding country districts. In my boyhood its vehicular traffic was considered great and important, and the guard’s bugle notes echoed through it as the mail coach entered the city, especially when bringing tidings of national importance.