NLA NEWSPAPERS – TUMBULGUM AND THE TWEED RIVER

 

bells at condong 001

JOHN and NORMAN BELLS’ LANDS ARE IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO TUMBULGUM. I came to live on the Tweed in 2001 and in Tumbulgum in 2002. My mother Joyce Bells and her sisters and brother grew up in Sydney in a street called TWEEDMOUTH AVENUE. My own granddaughter Madeline was born at TWEED HEADS HOSPITAL in 2004.

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TENDERS for the CONVEYANCE OF MAILS ON NORTH  COAST NSW AND TRAIN SCHEDULES

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article819748

ESTIMATES FOR SUBORDINATE ROADS IN NORTHERN NSW 1883

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article869143

Cudgen, via Guilfoyle’s C, P. and M’Leod’s Creek, to

Tweed Junction, 8 miles, £200; Murwillumbah to
Tumbulgum, 8 miles, £200; Byangum, via Tweed
Junction to border, 30 miles, £1500; Byangum, via

Sebastopol, to Tweed River Heads, 6 miles, £150

CESSATION OF FERRY SERVICES ON TWEED RIVER 1934

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1172177

TWEED FERRYMAN SAVES WOMAN’S LIFE AT TUMBULGUM APRIL 1934

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1185619

TRUCK PLUNGES

FROM PUNT

Ferryman Saves
Woman’s Life

MURWILLUMBAH, April 2.

When the hand punt was almost across the north arm of the Tweed
River at Tumbulgum late this afternoon a motor truck which It was con-
veying suddenly ran back, broke the gates of the punt and fell into the
river, which at this spot is eight or nine feet deep. The truck was driven
by Mr. O. Hicks, who was accompanied by his wife and Mr. and Mrs.
Daly, of Newstead, Brisbane.

Mrs- Daly, the only occupant of the truck at the time, was seated in the
driver’s cabin. The ferryman, E. Hill, realising her danger, promptly leaned
over the lip of the punt and pulled her back on board. While running to
his wife’s assistance Mr. Daly fell and badly injured his leg. Half an hour
later the truck was hauled out of the water by a breakdown car.

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MURWILLUMBAH BEING  APP 10 KILOMETRES SOUTH OF CONDONG. MAYBE LESS. IT IS NOW THE MAIN TOWNSHIP AND CONDONG AND TUMBULGUM ARE SMALL VILLAGES. HERE are SOME NLA MURWILLUMBAH STORIES

MURWILLUMBAH HOTEL 1872

A CASE of most brutal assault occurred very

recently on the Tweed River. From the in-

formation that has reached us (Clarence

Examiner) we learn that a German named

William Mayers, a publican, residing and keep

ing the Murwillumbah Hotel on the Tweed

River, assaulted and beat his wife while in the

pains of labor, and that when the mother was

delivered the child was found not only lifeless,

but with two bruises one on the right temple ;

READ ON AT http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1298630

 

SUGAR CANE 1873 AND THE DRY SEASON

TWEED ROADS 1873

CONDONG IN THE NLA PAPERS

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THESE EXTRACTS ARE FROM THE PERIOD WHEN JOHN AND MARY ANN BELL WERE ON THE TWEED RIVER OF NSW INVOLVED IN CANE FARMING.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article919217

THE STORY OF A SUGAR MILL BALL IN 1881.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article856079

SUGAR INDUSTRY IN THE TWEED ( 1882)

The Sugar Industry at the

Tweed.

(Macleay Herald, Aug. 12.)

For upwards of twenty miles the banks of

this river are dotted with patches of cane.

Commencing at Cudgen, six miles from the

Heads, and proceeding up the head of navi-

gation (about twenty-two miles further), small

plantations show themselves here and there

all looking vigorous and healthy. But it must

not be supposed that the total area of land

under cane is large because it extends so far

in different directions ; I suppose, at a rough

estimate the whole of the Tweed sugar lands

at present under crop scarcely exceeds 2000

acres. And notwithstanding that the cultiva-

tion is so scattered there are few mills to be

seen, the greater part of the landowners

being content with growing the cane and

disposing of the crop to the Colonial Sugar

Company, whose mills are erected in a very

central spot at Condong. There is no

difficulty experienced in carrying the cane

to the mill, temporary jetties being made on

the river bank in the fields from which it is

carted and shot into punts which come

alongside to convey it to its destination.

Cane-growers mostly receive 10s per ton for

their cane but to secure this price, the cane

must be trashed ; when untrashed 9s is the

price paid and there are some that think the

9s for untrashed cane pays best.

The principal mill on the Tweed River is

that owned by the Colonial Sugar Company

already mentioned. This company owns

quite a fleet of large punts, a steam launch of

considerable size, and a larger paddle-boat, all

of which work on the river ; and in addition

to these a larger steamer called the Terra-

nora, named after a creek which empties into

the Tweed a few miles from the Heads .

 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article903793

WORK AT THE MILLS

COLONIAL SUGAR REFINING COMPANY

IT is hereby notified that WORK will be COM-

MENCED at the Company’s Sugar Mills on the

Clarence, Richmond, ano Tweed Rivers TOWARDS

THE END OF JULY. The hands will be engaged at

the Harwood, Chatsworth, Broadwater, and Condong

Mills, on TUESDAY, the 17th of July. The Southgate

Mill will not be worked. The season is expected to

extend over a period of from four to five months.

E. W. KNOX,

General Manager

 

 

NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIA NEWSPAPERS : CONDONG ON THE TWEED RIVER

bells at condong 004

Having found the NLA NEWSPAPERS: I am deeply engaged in HUNTING through them. These are a very good find. Free access and the opportunity to assist with editing the electronically transcribed articles. Easy and efficient and a treasure trove. 1803 to 1945. Who knows what’s hidden in there ? Today I am looking at Condong. Condong is a wee village on the Tweed River of NSW. Close to Tumbulgum and Murwillumbah. The significance for us is that John and Norman Bell had land on the River somewhere along the stretch between Condong and Tumbulgum.  The Tweed Heads Historical Society added this dimension to my knowledge of the family earlier this year. Stunned me. They have an image of Bells’ Wharf which I shall purchase at some time and put up here.   I have taken some Photographs myself at Dinsey Creek and across the river where perhaps the land was.

John Bell was known to have 100 acres of land at Condong in 1869 but had left the area by 1892 following an accident which left him invalided. (https://lynnesheritage.wordpress.com/2008/06/17/granny-bell-a-legend-in-her-own-lifetime/) Condong Creek it says. Portion no. 30.  His brother Norman had 300 acres adjoining and sister Wilhelmina had 55 acres.(according to LANDS RECORD DATA TWEED VALLEY 1866-1966 OF TWDHS)

NATIONAL LIBRARY AUSTRALIA NEWSPAPERS : CONDONG

WANTED to Let, on Clearing Leases,Seven

FARMS, of from forty to fifty acres

Help fix this text!

each ; fine scrub land ; river frontage, Tweed

River; eight miles from the Heads. Apply to

Mr. JOHN M’LEOD

 

I have included this one because John Bell’s mother Wilhellmina was a McLeod. Wilhelmina married James Bell a convict from Glasgow in the Hunter district at Paterson . In 1869 John Bell had land on the Tweed at Condong . Is John McLeod a connection ?

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA NEWSPAPERS : CONDONG

Having found the NLA NEWSPAPERS: I am deeply engaged in HUNTING through them. These are a very good find. Free access and the opportunity to assist with editing the electronically transcribed articles. Easy and efficient and a treasure trove. 1803 to 1945. Who knows what’s hidden in there ? Today I am looking at Condong. Condong is a wee village on the Tweed River of NSW. Close to Tumbulgum and Murwillumbah. The significance for us is that John and Norman Bell had land on the River somewhere along the stretch between Condong and Tumbulgum.  The Tweed Heads Historical Society added this dimension to my knowledge of the family earlier this year. Stunned me. They have an image of Bells’ Wharf which I shall purchase at some time and put up here.   I have taken some Photographs myself at Dinsey Creek and across the river where perhaps the land was.

John Bell was known to have 100 acres of land at Condong in 1869 but had left the area by 1892 following an accident which left him invalided.

 

WANTED to Let, on Clearing Leases,Seven

FARMS, of from forty to fifty acres

Help fix this text!

each ; fine scrub land ; river frontage, Tweed

River; eight miles from the Heads. Apply to

Mr. JOHN M’LEOD,

 

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters

http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/index.htm 

Mary-Anne Warner’s site transcribing STATE RECORDS of SHIPS. easy to navigate. Detailed.

There’s many a story to tell . . .

Masters, crew, a stowaway or two; passengers, cabin, saloon and steerage; births at sea, deaths at sea; deserters; vessels with one crew and one passenger and those with 70 crew and hundreds of passengers; simple single sail boats, barques, brigs, large steam ships; whaling voyages, regular coastal passenger trips, voyages from other Australian ports, London, San Francisco, China and other exotic ports – you will find them all here. 

The lists on this site are being transcribed from the State Records Authority of NSW Reels of the Shipping Master’s Office, Inwards Passengers Lists . . . . . . are added to weekly

MELINDA KENDALL : HER LIFE AND WRITINGS