Would you like to help transcribe shipping records for the ‘Claim a Convict’ website?

The more names that are transcribed – the more information will be available for researchers and provide improved access to records. Volunteers do not require any special skills and only need to set aside a few hours to transcribe an indent per ship, from the comfort of your home. On average there are 200-300 names per ship which equals about 3-4 hours’ work of transcribing.

As part of the procedure of getting names listed onto the Claim a Convict website, we first have to transcribe primary records into a useable format. This is where we need your help – transcribing and checking information from the original shipping indents into a spreadsheet. Once this process has been completed, the material you have helped transcribe is then saved into another format and then the updated information is uploaded to the website. You will be attributed for any new information you contribute.

via .

via .

Crowded Houses, Empty Nests – Hindsight – ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Crowded Houses, Empty Nests

Listen nowDownload audio

Sunday 23 March 2014 1:05PM

Utilising the collection of oral history interviews from the Australian Generations project, this feature goes inside that personal space we call home. We open the door on Australian houses and homes to discover the way we’ve lived domestically over the past eighty years. Boarders and lodgers, landladies and lovers all figure in households of the past; and while the recent decades have seen Australian houses expand in size, the number of people living in them has shrunk.

IMAGE: A FIBRO HOME IN AUSTRALIA CIRCA 1940S

This program takes a long view of the story of house and home in Australia across the 20th century.

Participants from the Australian Generations Oral History project, whose memories feature in today’s program, include; Ronnie Gauci, John Christodoulou, Diane Singh, Judy Martin, Georgina Hammersley, Olinda Poulton, Robert Howard, Marion Mills, Susan Guerin, Patricia Barrkman, Lynne Sanders-Braithwaite, Marie Cousen, David Cooper, Kim Bear, Russell Elliott, Lisa Jackson, Jo Sanaghan Cross, Stephen Brown, Gwen Waters, and Clare Atkins.

via Crowded Houses, Empty Nests – Hindsight – ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

via Crowded Houses, Empty Nests – Hindsight – ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

Sands Directory search – City of Sydney

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via Sands Directory search – City of Sydney.

via Sands Directory search – City of Sydney.

Sands Sydney, Suburban and Country Commercial Directory – City of Sydney

Step back in time

The firm of John Sands Ltd (Printers and Stationers) published their directory each year from 1858-59 to 1932-33 (except for 1872, 1874, 1878 and 1881). The household and business information it contains has become a fundamental source for research into Sydney history, especially family history.

Until now the directory has usually been accessed through a microfiche edition made by WF Pascoe Ltd which is available at many public libraries.

The City of Sydney has now obtained a complete digital edition of the directory from WF Pascoe, scanned from the microfiche, and is making it available for public access through this website.  This is the first time a complete set of Sands Sydney, Suburban and Country Commercial Directory has been made available online.

via Sands Sydney, Suburban and Country Commercial Directory – City of Sydney.

via Sands Sydney, Suburban and Country Commercial Directory – City of Sydney.

AUSTRALIAN FOLKLORE UNIT: curated by Warren Fahey

AN OVERVIEW

Australia’s convict history shaped the Australian identity. It is hard to imagine how the transportation system was viewed by government and the general population let alone the wretched souls condemned to be shipped to what was generally held to be the ‘end of the earth’. For the authorities it was a system devised to reduce the number of people incarcerated in its asylums, jails and prison hulks. Reports show that the prison system was literally bursting at the seams from an over-zealous legal system, mostly protecting property, be it a piece of cloth or a squire’s holding. As a young lad growing up in the 1950s I regularly heard stories about ‘young boys’, usually around nine or ten year’s of age, being transported to Australia for ‘stealing a loaf of bread’. Although the majority of convicts were considerably older there were certainly some young boys and girls condemned to life in the Australian colonies.

The following section, gleaned from many sources, offers an insight into the why’s, how’s and where’s of the transportation system. Most are first-hand accounts. Grammar and spelling has been retained as per the original document.

via AUSTRALIAN FOLKLORE UNIT: curated by Warren Fahey.

via AUSTRALIAN FOLKLORE UNIT: curated by Warren Fahey.

OLD GOVERNMENT HOUSE WINDSOR

Image

CAWB – Save Windsor from the RTA
Some interesting photosWe have been sent some photos of Old Government House, Windsor that are new to us.

They are particularly interesting because they are the last taken as it was demolished in the early 1920’s. What is of particular interest is that it shows how it was built and some interior glimpses. Unlike stone and brick structures there is almost nothing existing from the 1700’s built of wood and wattle and daub, let alone an important building such as this.

What is extraordinary is it survived termites, fire and flood in this hostile new environment for about 130 years and by looking at the pictures could have been fully restored if the will was there.

If you look closely at the walls you can see the plaster finishing over the wattle timber straps, much of it still in place. The final shot of it being torn down reveals the ceilings of wooden boards. The front exterior shot shows amazingly the original wooden shingle roof which had been accidentally preserved under a replacement tin outer skin and only revealed in demolition.

One can only imagine the dozens of major figures of our colonial history that rested, ate, conversed and lived under its roof as they planned our new country.

It is a tragedy that this prime example of building techniques at the birth of our nation was systematically destroyed. This was done in spite of protests at the time to council.

As one looks at the torn down end wall we can see revealed the still solid cedar roof structure. One senses a repeat performance for the Jolly Frog Hotel.

The cultural vandalism demonstrated here robs us all of our shared cultural memory for short term gains and long term loss. The saga of the Jolly Frog is yet to begin but it is should become a symbolic marker that such disrespect for heritage ends here.

We, the guardians of our culture, are offended and degraded by such activity and do not regard expedience, greed, ignorance and laziness as valid justification for robbing us of a unique legacy to hand onto our great grandchildren – its our responsibility to resist and win.

CAWB - Save Windsor from the RTA's photo.

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A GALLERY OF PHOTOS FROM THE GAINGE GIRLS

SHOTS OF SUSSEX STREET WHERE THE READYS HAD A SHOP – COURTESY JON SANDERS

SUSSEX STREET

 

This builtding is at the other end of the block on the corner w King Street

I have been doing a bit of research on city buildings and I remembered that I have a note somewhere (from info you sent me) that Peter Ready had a shop at 165 Sussex Street.
I went down this morning not expecting much and unsurprisingly 165 is no longer there. However the block it was in is largely still 19th C because the Sheraton 4 Points Hotel occupies the whole site and apart from what I calculate to be about 161-169 (which have been demolished for the main entrance ) the rest of the Western side of the street is intact and incorporated into thehotel.

2.02.14 171 Sussex Street

 

This pre 1860s pub is at 171 and is directly to the left of the Entrance Drive way.
The yellow building to the left of it is the Corn Exchange (originally a fruit market and the oldest existing market building in the city) from 1887.

SUSSEX STREET

JOHN SCOTT ON 26 JANUARY 2014

Originally posted on LYNNE SANDERS-BRAITHWAITE:

Thank you John Scott for expressing what I believe many of us are thinking today,

John ScottImage
18 minutes ago
For Australia’s indigenous people today, 26th January, marks the onset of a catastrophic process of dispossession the consequences of which still lie very heavily on Aboriginal people and more broadly on Australian society generally; for them and for many non-indigenous Australians it is proper to mark this day as Invasion Day. I also like to remember it as Fatal Shore Day. I think it is right to remember the convict human cargo of the First Fleet, transported in reeking holds to what, in 1788, might as well have been Mars for all the hope they ever had of seeing English (or Irish) shores again. It is quite true that in time some of them, and some of their descendants, played a role in the near-destruction of Aboriginal society; but it…

View original 76 more words

and as for SLIM DUSTY and us.

Originally posted on SANDERS OF KINCHELA:

Robert Latimer Slim Dusty is part of our mob according to Vera Latimer [Sanders] my mother and Aunty May Everson [Sanders].
11 hours ago · Unlike · 1

Lynne Sanders-Braithwaite And my Dad, Bruce.
11 hours ago · Like

Robert Everson yes a bit hard when his Grandmother is Mary Anne Everson (sister-in-law of Elizabeth Grace Sanders) and Grandfather William Robert Partridge a great Uncle of Frank Partridge VC
55 minutes ago · Like

Cathy Gainge Slim, his mum, Mary Kirkpatrick, nee Partridge, her mum, Mary Partridge, nee Everson, sister of Edred who married Elizabeth Grace Sanders, daughter of William and Mary Ann. So fully related to the Everson side of the Sanders clan.
53 minutes ago · Like

Cathy Gainge Hehe, Robert must type a bit faster than me.

View original

THOMAS SANDERS VIA CATHY GAINGE

Cathy Gainge Further to what Lynne has said: Thomas the third fleeter was convicted in Essex but we don’t have his birthplace. When he married, his children were given the same names as our William’s grandfather’s siblings. He died 3 years before William and Mary Ann arrived and they stayed with his son Thomas when they arrived. Thomas (convict) had a grandson, John Tebbutt, astronomer, who appeared on the $100 note and I think Uncle Rex looked a little like him.

Auld Genealogy: Relaunch of the Claim A Convict website

Relaunch of the Claim A Convict website

I have been remiss in my blogging duties over the last month due to a more pressing assignment the relaunch of the Claim A Convict website.

Background

Started by researcher Lesley Uebel, the Claim a Convict website originally went online on 19 August 1998. The site offered other researchers a free service that enabled those researching the same convicts ancestors to contact each other directly by email. Although the site did not include every convict that arrived, the researcher lists provided an invaluable resource to the research community. Unfortunately Lesley fell ill during the second half of 2013, passing away on 20 January 2014.

It was during the later part of 2013 when Lesley\’s website was no longer active, a small team of individuals set about to get the website back online. With the help of Lesley\’s husband, Colin Kennedy, and friend, Coralie Hird, the original website files were found and sent onto the new Claim A Convict team of Michelle Nichols and myself. At the beginning of 2014 the data contained on the original website files (created from Word) was converted into a more manageable format and a new SQL database driven interface was designed for the site.

via Auld Genealogy: Relaunch of the Claim A Convict website.

via Auld Genealogy: Relaunch of the Claim A Convict website.

JUST IN FROM BRIAN AHEARN. BOOK LAUNCH OF BEYOND THE SEA AND THE ATLAS LOG

Atlas Log copy Beyond the Sea two volumes copy Atlas Log copy Press Release Beyond the Sea•  There are two volumes with a limited special first edition binding.
•  Each book is hard-bound in green leather and blocked in gold.
•  There are 1,300 pages with 753 illustrations, Including a bibliography and index.
Separate to the two volumes is the log book of the convict transport ‘Atlas’. A total of 363 pages,
The following is an overview of content:
On the morning of November 29, 1801, a heavy wooden wagon, lumbered through the streets of Cork and moved slowly in the direction of the port of Cobh. Absorbing the bumps in the springless cart was a young sworn United Irishman named Murtagh Ahern and his two brothers John and Michael. They had been sentenced to suffer death for rebellious outrages and the brutal murders of all the male members of a Tithe-Proctor’s family at Croom in County Limerick.
    Their commuted sentences to life ‘beyond the sea’ would see them chained below the deck of the ‘Death ship’ Atlas and spend 220 agonising days amongst sick, hungry and disease ridden inmates.  It would be the worst voyage in the history of Irish convict transportation to the infant colony of New South Wales. Sixty-five convicts, including his brother John, would join the sufferers on their voyage to the deep.
    At 2 o’clock on July 6, 1802 Murtagh arrived in Port Jackson with his brother Michael. They would suffer, but survive, the most turbulent times in the history of Australia. Murtagh would marry English convict Mary Abbey. They would produce seventeen children and become one of the pioneer families of Liverpool. He worked for Lieutenant Edward Lord in Van Diemen’s Land and under Lieutenant-Governor David Collins. In 1810 he received a pardon from Governor Lachlan Macquarie. He became a constable, a hotelier and a prominent farmer on the Georges River.
    This is the story of an ordinary Irishman who arrived in Sydney, his neck and ankles locked in heavy irons and chains, with only a tattered shirt and trousers to protect him from the extreme elements. Penniless, sick, hungry and treated as a beast of burden, he was classed as an inferior being, one on the scrap heap of humanity. Murtagh had been and continued to be confronted by some of the most extraordinary circumstances and times in our history, yet he showed immense courage and compassion and overcame his predicament to create a large family of many proud ‘native Australians’. He lived up to his family motto:
Per ardua surgo
     I rise through difficulties
This book gives a sweep of Irish history from Murtagh’s ancestor Brian Boru the High King of Ireland, the dark days of Oliver Cromwell, the horrors and privations of the 1798 Irish rebellion to the discovery and founding of Australia. It details the struggles of succeeding Governors and the characters who made Australia what it is today.  The second volume also covers the early Irish family records of Murtagh and Mary’s family in Mileham. The background of their seventeen children is also included.
•  There are two volumes with a limited special first edition binding.
•  Each book is hard-bound in green leather and blocked in gold.
•  There are 1,300 pages with 753 illustrations, Including a bibliography and index.
Separate to the two volumes is the log book of the convict transport ‘Atlas’. A total of 363 pages,
The following is an overview of content:
On the morning of November 29, 1801, a heavy wooden wagon, lumbered through the streets of Cork and moved slowly in the direction of the port of Cobh. Absorbing the bumps in the springless cart was a young sworn United Irishman named Murtagh Ahern and his two brothers John and Michael. They had been sentenced to suffer death for rebellious outrages and the brutal murders of all the male members of a Tithe-Proctor’s family at Croom in County Limerick.
    Their commuted sentences to life ‘beyond the sea’ would see them chained below the deck of the ‘Death ship’ Atlas and spend 220 agonising days amongst sick, hungry and disease ridden inmates.  It would be the worst voyage in the history of Irish convict transportation to the infant colony of New South Wales. Sixty-five convicts, including his brother John, would join the sufferers on their voyage to the deep.
    At 2 o’clock on July 6, 1802 Murtagh arrived in Port Jackson with his brother Michael. They would suffer, but survive, the most turbulent times in the history of Australia. Murtagh would marry English convict Mary Abbey. They would produce seventeen children and become one of the pioneer families of Liverpool. He worked for Lieutenant Edward Lord in Van Diemen’s Land and under Lieutenant-Governor David Collins. In 1810 he received a pardon from Governor Lachlan Macquarie. He became a constable, a hotelier and a prominent farmer on the Georges River.
    This is the story of an ordinary Irishman who arrived in Sydney, his neck and ankles locked in heavy irons and chains, with only a tattered shirt and trousers to protect him from the extreme elements. Penniless, sick, hungry and treated as a beast of burden, he was classed as an inferior being, one on the scrap heap of humanity. Murtagh had been and continued to be confronted by some of the most extraordinary circumstances and times in our history, yet he showed immense courage and compassion and overcame his predicament to create a large family of many proud ‘native Australians’. He lived up to his family motto:
Per ardua surgo
     I rise through difficulties
This book gives a sweep of Irish history from Murtagh’s ancestor Brian Boru the High King of Ireland, the dark days of Oliver Cromwell, the horrors and privations of the 1798 Irish rebellion to the discovery and founding of Australia. It details the struggles of succeeding Governors and the characters who made Australia what it is today.  The second volume also covers the early Irish family records of Murtagh and Mary’s family in Mileham. The background of their seventeen children is also included.
PS
It maybe an opportunity to visit, prior to the talk, Murty and Mary’s headstone in Liverpool Pioneers’ Memorial Park.
The park is a fitting reward for the wonderful work that Liverpool City Council has done in restoring the headstones of its pioneers.
It is estimated about 15,000 people are buried there. Only about 10 such cemetery parks exist in NSW.
The Park is located on the corner of Campbell, Macquarie Street and the Hume Highway in Liverpool.
Hi everyone,

 
Some good news.

 
As you know, Murty and Mary Ahern along with their numerous children were one of the pioneer families of Liverpool.
 
On hearing of the books, and log of the Atlas, the City of Liverpool Library and Museum enthusiastically asked to become involved in launching the books.
 
They have generously made the Gold Room in their magnificent library available as a venue.
 
The launch is part of Liverpool City Council’s on-going support of Liverpool and Australia’s historical heritage. 
 
 
The presentation, including visuals, titled ‘Irish Rebel to Liverpool Pioneer’ will be on Wednesday, 27th November 2013 at 5pm. 
It will include a unique display of rare documents and convict Australiana never before seen in Australia.
 
Some details:
 
Light refreshments at 4pm. 
 
Venue is the Gold Room at the Liverpool City Library 170 George Street Liverpool. Parking is available at the rear of the library.
 
Please confirm your attendance by calling Liverpool City Library on 98219422 by Friday 22 November 2013.
 
Further information is available by contacting Julie Senior who is co-ordinating the event.   email: j.senior@liverpool.nsw.gov.au

SANDERS OF KINCHELA IN THE NLA

The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 – 1942), Friday 12 February 1904,

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Friday 23 December 1910,

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15190947

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW 1842 - 1954), Friday 23 December 1910,

Warwick Examiner and Times (Qld. : 1867 – 1919), Wednesday 18 January 1911,

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article82200041

Warwick Examiner and Times (Qld. 1867 - 1919), Wednesday 18 January 1911,

The Land (Sydney, NSW : 1911 – 1954), Friday 1 September 1916

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102933611

The Land (Sydney, NSW 1911 - 1954), Friday 1 September 1916

CRAIGS OF KINCHELA

Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), Wednesday 25 February 1885,

CRAIG Evening News (Sydney, NSW 1869 - 1931), Wednesday 25 February 1885, article126361834-3-001______________________________________________________________________________

Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 – 1954), Tuesday 4 February 1941,

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article98637539

Northern Star (Lismore, NSW 1876 - 1954), Tuesday 4 February 1941,______________________________________________________________________

TRACING HER ANCESTRY FROM ENGLAND, SCOTLAND AND IRELAND TO NEW SOUTH WALES

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